Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, April 14, 1932, Page PAGE FOUR, Image 4

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    PAGE FOUR
HEPPNER GAZETTE TIMES, HEPPNER, OREGON, THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 1932.
THE HEPPNER GAZETTE,
Established March 30, 1SS3;
THE HEPPNER TIMES
Established November 18. 1S97;
CONSOLIDATED FEBRUARY 15. 1912.
Published every Thursday morning by
VAWTEB and SPENCER. CRAWFORD
and entered at the Post Office at Hepp
ner, Oregon, as second-class matter.
ADVEETISING KATES GIVEN ON
APPLICATION.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
One Year
Six Months
Three Months
Single Copies
$2.00
1.00
.75
.05
Official Paper for Morrow County.
MEMBCft
c ToreSn1&'teJP p
EDTOIAClSOCIjmON
AIR TR.WEL GETTING SAFER.
Autocaster Service.
WE SAW a report the other day
on the aviation industry, which
indicates that the building and op
eration of aircraft has suffered less
from the industrial depression than
any other line of business. More
people are flying, more young peo
ple are growing up air-minded, air
planes are getting better, safer and
swifter, and it seems a pretty safe
thing to predict that by the time
the children of today are grown up
air travel will be as commonplace
to them as automobile travel is to
the grownups of now.
We haven't the figures, but we
imagine that in proportion to the
number of people who travel by air
there are no more fatal accidents
than there are among motorists.
Commercial aviation is getting saf
er because safety is the first con
sideration of the designers of com
mercial aircraft Only a few years
ago most of the planes in the air
were left-overs from the war per
iod. Safety is not the first consid
eration in military airplanes; speed
and maneuverability are the prime
requisites there. Army and navy
fliers have to take enormously
greater risks than passengers in
commercial airplanes should ever
be called upon to take. And in
fourteen years of peace the world
has learned much more about mak
ing air travel safe than it had
learned in the nine years between
the first flights and the entry of
the United States into the war.
THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS.
Autocaster Service.
WE DON'T know who the happi
est man on earth is, but we do
know who the unhappiest people
are. They are the ' people who
thought they could buy happiness
with money and who, now that
their sources of money have dried
up, find themselves thrown upon
their own resources, and have dis
covered that those resources are
not sufficient to bring them happi
ness. We do not know whether to
feel sorry for these people, espec
ially the younger ones, or indigna
tion at their parents and teachers,
for giving them or permitting them
to get a wrong slant on life.
We confess to a considerable de
gree of indignation when we hear
people advising young folks to buy
this, that or the other thing be
cause it will make them happy. We
think there are very few commod
ities, and those very inexpensive
ones, that can make any material
contribution to individual happi
ness. Possessions may enlarge one's
sense of self-importance. Money
may enable people to do things
which give temporary pleasure.
But the idea that "the rich are any
happier than the poor is just as
false now as it always has been.
We think one of the real bene
fits of these hard times to many
people has been that it has forced
them to develop their inward re
sources and depend upon their own
efforts for happiness. We have cer
tainly heard much more complain
ing from people who still have a
good deal of money left than we
have heard from people who did
n't have much of anything to lose.
The man or woman who has learn
ed in childhood to get along with
little is far better adapted to face
the realities of life than the one
who has always been able to buy
whatever pleased his or her fancy.
Those are the unhappy ones today
the ones who cannot spend mon
ey as they used to spend while the
happy ones are those who never
had any money to spend.
Sunday School
n a Lesson u
International Sunday School Lesson foi
April 17.
THE CALL OF ABB AM
Genesis 12:1-9
Rev. Samuel D. Price, D. D.
Since much of the record is omit
ted necessarily in this course, you
should read the intervening Scrip
ture. For example, the Flood and
the Ark of Noah figure in the in
terim and again the earth is wide
ly peopled. From the sin of Adam
and Eve God, in His love, laid out
a plan of redemption and now the
time had arrived to begin to devel
op it The aftermath of the flood
showed that such a punishment
would not turn people from their
sins. God now purposes to provide
a Redeemer in time from among a
race that He would especialy
choose and bless. The beginning of
the Hebrew nation started with this
call of Abram. In fact it began
when Terah, the father, was called
from Ur of the Chaldees, but the
cavalcade stopped in Mesopotamia
and no further progress was made
until Abram was directed to take
his immediate family, his nephew
Lot, and their possessions, and pro
ceed to Canaan.
Here was an adventure in faith
that Is to be classed with the great
est expeditions in all history. It
was a trek of at least 300 miles un
der the most adverse conditions.
Full encouragement was given,
however, in the vision with Its at
tendant promises.
Places in Palestine that are fa
miliar to every student now are
named. One camping place was at
Shcchem, where the modern travel
er can still have a drink from the
well of Abraham. This was the
writer's privilege in 1924. Bethel is
also named, and we come to it
again in this quarter when we Jour
ney to Haran with Jacob. At both
topping places Abraham estab
lished an altar and worshipped
God. He had found that Jehovah
wu as much there as in the coun
tries whence he came. And here
the covenant was renewed, with the
former injunctions, recorded in the
Golden Text. "Be thou a blessing,"
Genesis 12 2.
W.C.T.U. NOTES
MARY A. NOTSON. Reporter.
When is a man drunk? This
question arises in the actions
against drunken drivers. It is not
an easy queston to answer. As one
writer saye, "It is like the old ques
tion frequently asked but never
satisfactorily answered When does
a pig become a hog?" It might be
possible to say that in one envir
onment, a man would be considered
sober, while in another he might
be considered drunk. Some persons
would regard one as sober if he
could keep on the sidewalk, or pos
sibly if he could keep on his feet.
But in the growing complexity of
modern life and our high-speed,
machine civilization, a new defini
tion is necessary. In England it
has been necessary to change the
definition of drunkenness in con
nection with motor car driving. Sir
Arthur Newsholme, former princi
pal medical officer of the British
ministry of health, has emphatical
ly stated that a single drink of
whiskey or beer may make the dif
ference between life and death, and
twenty-six eminent physicians have
memorialized the minister of trans
port to issue warning cards to mo
torists that a single drink of whis
key or beer may slow down the
muscular respones as much as one
half or even three-quarters, so that
action which normally would re
quire only one-fifth of a second
would be slowed to two-fifths or
even four-fifths. The Expert Com
mittee of the British Medical Asso
ciation reports to the transport
minister that "Fine shades of self
control might be lost without any
apparent signs of alcoholic intoxi
cation. The first effect of alcohol
is on the higher centers and is sub
jective, even if no objective symp
toms occur." And yet here in
America, where the drink traffic
has been outlawed, and where al
most every man i3 a driver of an
automobile, some seemingly other
wise intelligent folks are arguing
that the drink traffic should be re
stored in some form. The whole
scheme is to make it easier to ob
tain liquor.
Suppose the muscular action is
slowed down one half, so that it re
quires two-fifths of a second to ac
complish a movement which nor
mally requires only one-fifth of a
second, and suppose two automo
biles are approaching each other at
the rate of forty miles per hour,
the two cars would travel 47 feet
while the required muscular move
ment was being performed, instead
of twenty-three and one-half feet
It does not require much exper
ience on the roads to realize that
that 23 feet would many times
mean a wreck and loss of life. And
when we realize that a single drink
of intoxicating liquor may be the
cause of such a disaster, it would
seem that sensible people would be
doing their utmost to remove that
hazard. And when we consider
that in some instances that hazard
may be increased two or three
times by a single drink, we wonder
that people are not asking that per
sons who drink even very small
amounts of liquor be barred from
driving cars on the public roads.
That would probably be considered
extreme, but if you thought that
your life and the lives of your wife
and children were endangered by
an incompetent driver, you would
want him excluded from the road
while you were traveling on it. Is
personal liberty so dear and life so
cheap?
Mother Knows It's Spring
By Albert T. Reid
I'd like to vcNOxy vhatIs happeued
TO MY OASE BALL SL"T VO YOU
K.NOV WHERE IT'S AT ?
SAYrLL'-WHERE
THE HECK AR.E MY
GARDEN TOOLS AMD
THAT OLD PAIR. Of
PANTS ?
f
v HEUOrMlSSrS PERKINS, I SnV
VERY bTKC?Mj iHia nfi1'',
AND I DOESN'T KEL Lie
INVQK.K.IN t )
in
OH, MUMSlS-DID YOU SEE THIS AOOR.
able Picture of clab.k6a.ble.?
couldn't you just love him.
H
L2T;-..
7L M
JOH NJOS C PH GAINVD
A Word of Caution
How often a neighbor discovers
something that "broke up" his cold
in record time. He at once be
comes a walking apostle of that
remedy. Within a week, perhaps,
a half-dozen of his acquaintances
are taking the same thing. It mat
ters not whether it is a nostrum or
a regular prescription it gets into
promiscuous use very quickly.
Once I prescribed for an old man
who had ulcer of the stomach; he
told me two weeks later, that he
had furnished at least four of his
neighbors with that same prescrip
tion! It is a very pernicious, not
to say dangerous thing, to recom
mend medicines for people who
have not been duly examined by a
competent physician although the
motives are of a kind, helpful spir
it. You see, no two people are alike,
even with the same disease. Two
cases of influenza may demand en
tirely different remedies. What
would be indicated for one, might
be dangerous for another. No two
hearts are exactly alike. The same
medicine, if it is medicine at all,
acts differenty with different indi
viduals; these are truths.
The custom of buying stock rem
edies for "colds" is one of the most
reckless especially those adver
tised to "cure a cold in one day."
Anything that works that fast is
most surely dangerous.
Just imagine a factory turning
out suits of clothes all the same
size and length and color and urg
ing our people to buy them, but it
would not be dangerous like medi
cine.
Securities Fail to Stop
- Wheat From Gaining
Wheat prices continued to show
net gains for the week, In spite of
the depressing influence of the se
curity markets, says Portland
Grain exchange for week ending
April 9.
The slow foreign demand has
been disappointing to exporters;
high tariffs and the ability of im
porting countries to cut their wheat
consumption has altered anticipat
ed demand. Australia and Argen
tina shipments continue heavy and
Vancouver, B. C, has been enjoy
ing a moderately active export de
mand at about 5c to 7c a bushel
under the present price of local
wheat, favorable exchange based
on Canadian discount aiding.
The break In wheat prices Friday
was the worst experienced for
some time; crop damage reports
being utterly Ignored. The Gov
ernment Report released after the
close gave winter wheat a condition
of only 75.8 with an estimated
yield of 458 million bushels or 42
million under the average of the
private estimates. This had a most
stimulating effect on Saturday's
market and the loss of Friday was
recovered.
There was no local export busi
ness but the cash position here re
mained tight, shipments from the
Interior being extremely light.
Portland Futures show net gains
for the week as follows: May up
3 3-8c, July up I l-8c and Septem
ber up 2 5-8c per bushel.
Try a Gazette Time Want Ad
Joseph By cutting a huge 12 by
24 foot kitchen in half a homemak
er in Joseph has obtained a play
room for the children where it is
possible for her to keep an eye on
their activities. Because it opens
off the kitchen the room is usually
warm in the winter. Equipment
can be arranged to better advan
tage in the smaller kitchen, thus
saving many steps and much time,
according to this homemaker,
Lamb Prospects Improve
But Crop Appears Short
Improved conditions for a less
than normal lamb crop, but some
decline in prices recently on new
crop lambs were reported by the O.
S. C. Extension service at the close
of the first week of April.
With an abundance of moisture
in the soil, Oregon ranges and pas
tures are now making good growth.
Conditions in the high mountains,
where the snow covering exceeds
the normal for this time of the
year, are encouraging to stockmen.
Many sheep and cattle, especially
in southern counties, are being
moved to early ranges.
While some new crop lambs from
Willamette valley flocks have al
ready gone to market, lambing in
the range bands of eastern Oregon
is just well under way. In valley
flocks the lamb crop was heavy,
but in the bands of eastern and
southern Oregon, considerable loss
of old ewes occurred and more than
normal loss of lambs due to poor
condition of ewes following a se
vere winter on poor quality feed.
In Douglas county where early
market lambs are a feature, sheep
came through the winter in fair
shape despite limited feed, and are
now making good progress on bet
ter than normal grass. The lamb
crop is shorter than in recent years
on account of unfavorable weather
in January when the heavy lamb
drop occurred. With creep feeding
more common this year, lambs have
made good growth and some al
ready weigh 60 pounds or more.
New lamb prices declined as in
creased supplies became available.
First offerings of the season brot
as high as $10 a hundred in nearly
all markets. At the close of trad
ing on April 8, good to near choice
spring lambs sold at Portland at
$7.50, with lower quotations report
ed at San Francisco. Thirty to 40
per cent of the California early
lamb crop has left growers hands.
These have mostly gone into coast
markets, though some have gone to
the central west and a few cars of
dressed lambs to the Atlantic coast,
stove so I moved the work table in
to the pantry. I took down all the
old wide shelves and had narrower
ones put in at more convenient
places, also added some 'built-ins.'
Then I painted up and now have a
more convenient and cheerier place
to work in, all at the cost of a very
little lumber and paint. Also, I put
a col(J cupboard on the back porch.
There I keep vegetables, apples and
the like. Left overs and milk are
placed in the cold cupboard in the
pantry."
nOLITICAL
Announcements
FOB COUNTY' COMMISSIONER.
To the voters of the Republican
Party:
I hereby announce myself as a
candidate for the office of County
Commissioner at the Primary Nom
inating Election to be held May
20th, 1932.
FRANK S. PARKER,
(Paid Advertisement)
Rickreall Kitchen improvement
has proved fascinating work to a
Rickreall homemaker who tells how
she made her kitchen work easier
with no money outlay.
"My kitchen is an old one with a
pantry," she says. "Fortunately
the pantry is on a line with the
'walk' in front of the sink and
times. GLEN R. HADLEY,
Boardman, Oregon.
(Paid Advertisement)
FOR SHERIFF.
To the Republican Voters of Mor
row County: I hereby announce
that I will be a candidate at the
Primary Election, May 20, 1932, for
the office of Sheriff of Morrow
County to succeed myself.
C. J. D. BAUMAN.
(Paid Advertisement)
FOR COUNTY CLERK.
To the Republican Voters of Mor
row County: I hereby announce
that I will be a candidate for nom
ination to the office of Clerk of
Morrow County at the Primary
Election to be held May 20, 1932.
PAUL M. GEMMELL.
(Paid Advertisement)
FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER.
To the Republican Voters of
Morrow County: I hereby announce
that I will be a candidate to suc
ceed myself for the office of coun
ty commissioner at the primary
election to be held May 20, 1932.
G. A. BLEAKMAN.
(Paid Advertisement)
FOR COUNTY CLERK.
I hereby announce to the voters
of Morrow county that I will be a
candidate for the office of County
Clerk on the Republican ticket at
the Primary Nominating Election
to be held May 20th, 1932.
GAY M. ANDERSON.
(Paid Advertisement)
seventh day of February. 1932. which
judgment was for tne sum of Eight
hundred and no-100 Dollars, together
Willi interest thereon at the rate ot
Eight percent per annum from the
Nineteenth day of June. 1929; the fur
ther sum of One hundred Twenty-live
and No-l(HJ Dollars, attorney's fee. and
plaintiffs costs and disbursements
taxed and allowed in the sum of Sev
enteen and No-lUO Dollars, and a de
cree of foreclosure against the defend
ants, Evan J. Evans and Emma Evans,
his wife. I will, on the Sixteenth day
of April, 1932, at the hour of Ten o'
clock A. M. of said day at the front
door of the county court house in
Heppner, Morrow County, Oregon. ' of
fer tor sale and sell to the highest bid
der for cash in hand, all of the follow
ing described real property in Morrow
County, State of Oregon, to-wit: ,
The East half of the Northwest
quarter and the North half of the
So
Cange Twenty-nve.
Southwest quarter of Section Twen
ty-five in Township one South of
rial
East of the
wniameiie Meridian,
or so much of said real property as
may be necessary to satisfy the pluin
tilfs judgment, costs and attorney's
fee and uccruing costs of sale.
C. J.'D. BAUMAN,
Sheriff of Morrow, County, State
of Oregon.
Date of First Publication: March
Seventeenth, 1932.
FOR COUNTY SCHOOL
SUPERINTENDENT.
I hereby announce that I will be
a candidate for the nomination to
the office of County School Super
intendent at the May Republican
Primary Nominating Election to
be held May 20, 1932.
MRS. LUCY E. RODGERS.
(Paid Advertisement) g
Professional Cards
r---------------------
Morrow County Free
Ambulance Service
Day or Night
Case Furniture Co.
Mrs. George Thomson
INSURANCE SPECIALIST
NOTICE OF FINAL SETTLEMENT.
Notice is hereby given that the un
dersigned, executor of the last Will and
Testament of David Henry Grabill, de
ceased, has filed his final account with
the Clerk of the County Court of the
State of Oregon, for Morrow County,
and that the Judge of said Court has
fixed Monday the 2nd day of May, 1932,
at the hour of 1:30 o'clock P. M. of
said day as the time, and the County
Court Room in the County Court House
at Heppner, Oregon, as the place for
the hearing and settlement of said ac
count. Any objections to said final ac
count must be filed with the Clerk of
said Court on or before said date.
OREN G. GRABILL,
Executor of the last Will and Tes
tament of David Henry Grabill,
deceased.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is March 31st, 1932.
The date of the last publication of
this notice is April 28th. 1932.
NOTICE OF FINAL SETLEMENT.
Notice is hereby given that the un
dersigned has filed her final account as
administratrix of the estate of Nancy
M. Meek, deceased, and that the Coun
ty Court of the State of Oregon for
Morrow County has appointed Monday,
the 9th day of May. 1932. at the hour of
10 o'clock in the forenoon of said day
as the time, and the County Court
room in the court house at Heppner.
regon, as the place, of bearing and
settlement of said final account. Ob
jections to said final account must be
filed on or before said date.
ANNA L. PUTNAM,
Administratrix.
FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER.
To the Republican Voters of Mor
row County: I hereby announce
that I will be a candidate for the
nomination to the office of County
Commissioner at the Primary Nom
inating Election, May 20. I prom
ise, if I am elected, I will do all in
my power to cut the expenses of
the county and carry on the work
to the best of my ability and for
the benefit of the taxpayers.
CREED OWEN.
(Paid Advertisement)
FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER.
To the Republican Voters of Mor
row County: I hereby announce
that I will be a candidate for the
nomination to the office of County
Commissioner at the Primary Nom
inating Election to be held May 20,
1932. ARNOLD PIEPER.
(Paid Advertisement)
FOR SHERIFF.
I wish to announce to the voters
of Morrow County that I am a can
didate for Sheriff on the Republi
can ticket.
I was born in Morrow county and
expect to die in Morrow county.
But while I live I wish to mingle
with, and serve Morrow county peo
ple. If it is the will of the voters to
elect me, I will serve to the best of
my ability, enforcing the law at all
BUD'n' BUB WPS? By ED KRESSY
4 (BUD-THERE'S VER I I ' TkNow wHA-TheN
TpoNT KNOW NHAT HEV I I LIABLE To gEMUiD iT
r-kgEMirJPS YOU of-But M C of THIKC MK I f
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
Notice is hereby given that the un
dersigned was duly appointed by the
County Court of the State of Oregon
for Morrow County, Executor of the
last Will and Testament of Lizzie
Humphreys, deceased. All persons
having claims against the estate of said
deceased are hereby required to pre
sent the same duly verified as by law
required, to the undersigned executor
at the law oillce of Joa. J. Nys, at
Heppner, Oregon, within six months
from the date hereof.
Dated and first published this 14th
uay oi April,
FRED ROOD, Executor,
NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROP
ERTY ON EXECUTION.
Notice is hereby given that under
and bv virtue of execution in loreclo
sure duly issued out of the Circuit
Court of the State of Oregon for Mor
row County on the 4th day of April,
1932. bv the Clerk of said Court pur
suant to a judgment, decree and order
of sale rendered and entered in said
Court on the 1st day of April, 1932. in a
certain suit In said Court wherein Ore
gon Mutual Life Insurance Company,
a corporation, was plaintiff and Maggie
E. Bell, a widow. The Bell Ranch. Inc.,
a corporation, Emory Cox, Robert Wig-
gieswortn, a. w. Hoicomne, tisie M.
Beach, Executrix of the last will and
testament of Carl L. Beach. Deceased
and John Doe and Jane Doe, his wife,
and Richard Roe and Mary Roe. hi
wife, defendants, and which Judgment
is in favor of plaintiff and against said
defendants, for the sum of $10,000.00.
with interest thereon from the 10th day
of January, 1931, and the further sum
of $1299.26, with interest thereon from
the 21st day of December, 1931, and
the further sum of $59.72, with interest
thereon from the 9th day of December.
1931, and the further sum of $400.00
attorney's fees, and by wfiicn decree
all the rights, title and Interest of the
above named defendants was ordered
sold in and to the following described
real property situated in Morrow
County, Oregon, to-wit: The southeast
quarter and the west half of section
twentv-one, the south half of the south
east quarter and the southwest quarter
ot section twenty-two, tne south
east Quarter of the northwest quarter.
the northeast quarter of the southwest
quarter, the south hair of the south
west Quarter of section twentv-three.
the northwest quarter of section twenty-six,
all of section twenty-seven, the
northeast quarter, the east half of the
nortnwest quarter, tne nortnwest quar
ter of the northwest quarter, the north
east quarter of the southwest quarter
or section twenty-eight, all In Town
ship one South, Rango Twenty-six
East of the Willamette Meridian, In the
County of Morrow and Stato of Oregon,
NOW, In obedience to said execution,
I will on Saturday, the 7th dny of May,
1932. at the hour of 10:00 o'colck A. M,
of said duy, at the front door of the
Court House, at Hennner. Oregon, se 1
at public auction to the highest bidder
for cash, all the right, title and Inter
est of said defendants In and to the
above described real property, and ap
ply the proceeds thereof to payment of
said judgment and decree and accruing
costs of sale.
Dated this the 6th day of April. 1932.
4-8. C. J. D. BAUMAN,
Sheriff of Morrow County, Oregon.
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION.
Department of the Interior, U. S.
Land OIHce at The Dalles, Oregon, Feb.
25, 1932.
NOTICE Is hereby given that John
E. LeTrace of Heppner, Oregon, who,
on Oct. 23, 1926, made Homestead En
try under Act Dec. 29. 1916, No. 025230,
for Lot 21, Sec. 7. Lots i, 6, 7, 8, 9, 16,
17, 18, 19, 20, 21, Sec. 18, and Lots 4, 5,
6, Section 19, Township 7 South, Range
29 East, Willamette Meridian, has filed
notice of Intention to make llnal Proof,
to establish claim to the land above de
scribed, before Gny M. Anderson, Uni
ted States Commissioner at Heppner,
Oregon, on the 2nd day of May, 1932.
Claimant names as witnesses:
R. C, Hummers, of Ritter, Oregon.
D, S. Flynn, of Ritter, Oregon.
O. E. Wright, of Heppner, Oregon.
J. O. Rasmus, of Hepnner, Oregon.
R. J. CARSNER, Register.
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE.
Notice is hereby given that by vir
tue of nn Execution issued out of the
Circuit Court of the Htato of Oregon
for Morrow County, dated March Fif
teenth, 1932, in that certain suit where
in Martha E. Jones, as plaintiff, recov
ered a Judgment against the defend
ant, Evan J. Evans, on the Twenty-
New York Life
Phone 824
Heppner, Ore.
J. 0. TURNER
Attorney at Law
Phone 173
Humphreys Building
HEPPNER, ORE.
A. B. GRAY, M. D.
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON
Phone 383
Heppner Hotel Building
Eyes Tested and Glasaes Fitted.
VM. BROOKIIOUSER
PAINTING PAFERHANGINO
INTERIOR SECORATINO
Leav orders at Peoples Hardware
Company
DR. C. W. BARR
- DENTIST
Telephone 1012
Office In Gilman Building
11 W. Willow Street
DR. J. H. McCRADY
DENTIST
X-Ray Diagnosis
L O. O. F. BUILDING
Heppner, Oregon
Frank A. McMenamin
LAWYER
905 Guardian Building
Residence. GArfleld 1949
Business Phone Atwater 1348
PORTLAND, OREGON
A. D. McMURDO, M. D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Trained Nurie Asilstant
Office In Masonic Building
Heppner, Oregon
P. W. 3IAIIONEY
ATTORNEY AT LAW
First National Bank Building
Heppner, Oregon
S. E. NOTSON
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Office in L O. O. F. Building
Heppner, Oregon
AUCTIONEER
Farm and Personnl Uroporty Sales
A Speclulty.
G. L. BENNETT
"The Man Who Talks to Beat
the Band"
5229 72nd Ave., S. E., Portland, Ore.
Phone Sunset 3461
J. 0. PETERSON
I-atast Jewelry and Gift Goods
Watches - Clocks - Diamonds
Expert Watch and Jewelry
Repairing
Heppnor, Oregon
P. W. TURNER & CO.
FIRE, AUTO AND LIFE
INSURANCE
Old Lin Companies. Real Eitats.
Heppner, Orogon
JOS. J. NYS
ATTONEY-AT-LAW
Roberts Building, Willow Street
Heppner, Oregon