Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, November 19, 1931, Page PAGE THREE, Image 3

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    HEPPNER GAZETTE TIMES, HEPPNER, OREGON, THURSDAY. NOV. 12, 1931.'
PAGE THREE
A Quick Millenium
When I was In London I read an
interesting, and rather pathetic,
newspaper article by the "baby"
member of Parliament His name
is Frank Owen.
He recalled his maiden speech in
which he proclaimed: "High hopes
brought this Parliament Into being.
We will make it a parliament of
high endeavor."
He had been full of fine plans in
those days. For one thing, the tim
ber men were to have higher wages.
"We got ttiem another Is. 6d. a
week," he says, "and then the State
sacked some of them. -
"We looked forward, to the de
bates on unemployment and agri
culture and the mines," he adds,
"and spoke from the back benches
when the heavy guns were at din
ner." He was twenty-three in those
days. Now he is twenty-five, and
wiser. His hopes have faded.
He thought he was going to play
a large part in changing England
and the Empire. Instead of this he
is "spending his time answering
letters issued by organizations or
dering us
a) to open cinemas on Sunday
(b) to close them.
(a) to prohibit sweepstakes (b)
to extend them."
He has about reached the con
clusion that all effort is futile, and
that the world is on its way to
perdition.
Some of us who are older can tell
him from our own experience that
he is now at the age of greatest
discouragement We, too, came into
life full of determination to set
things right instanter. We were
frankly critical of the bungling of
our predecessors. There should be
no more mistakes and no delay!
In a couple of years, we, too were
In the depths of despair, deepei
depths than we have ever been
since.
It is not clear to any human mind
just what is the whole purpose and
plan of human life. But two things
are reasonably apparent
First, it does not seem to be any
part of the program to have the
mlllenium come quickly or easily,
Gain is won only as a result of
sweat and blood, and time.
Second, as we get older we see
more clearly how destructive
would be if all the good ideas of
youth were allowed to become im
mediately effective. The first two
Great Reforms in whose service
myself labored were both success
ful. I think now that both were
bad mistakes.
So in our later years we give up
tne wea or a quick milennium.
Some of us do it in deep discour
agement Others say: "I cannot
lick the world, but there is one part
or it l can lick, namely, myself. I'll
see what I can do with that"
It's a good sporting proposition.
And who knows? Maybe the spread
or mat simple idea is the real plan
RUBBER
Mr. Edison died a few days too
soon to learn that the goal xf the
last great scientific quest in which
he was engaged had been reached
by somebody else. This was the
search for a new source of rubber.
Mr. Edison sought it in plants.
The new synthetic rubber is a pro
duct of the great chemical research
laboratories of E, I. Du Pont De
Nemours & Company, who have al
ready begun to build a factory for
its commercial manufacture. In
stead of being made from a veg
etable source the raw materials out
of which this artificial rubber is
made are coal, limestone, salt and
water.
It is not yet certain that this new
rubber will answer every purpose
for which rubber is now used, but
for many of such uses it is said to
be superior to the natural product
At any rate, it gives the United
States an independent source of
rubber, from which we can never
be cut off again in time of war as
we were a few years ago, and the
supply of the necessary raw mater
ials is literally unlimited.
BEAVERS
The most interesting thing that
has happened in my part of the
country fn years is the return of
the beavers to the Berkshire valley
near my farm.
It is pretty nearly a hundred
years since the last of the beavers
vanished with the last of the In
dians from Massachusetts, but a
few days ago some of my neighbors
observing that there seemed to be
more water than usual in the
swampy pond Just north of West
Stockbridge village, Investigated
and discovered that a family of
beavers had built a dam across the
little stream and were busily en
gaged in finishing up their winter
home. This is a dome-shaped
structure of logs and mud, with its
entrance under water to protect its
inhabitants from foxes, wolves and
other enemies. Beavers have nev
er been known to travel over land
and how these got to West Stock
bridge swamp is a mystery.
Unless they multiply and become
a pest, these new generations of
beavers will have an easier life
than did their ancestors. For two
hundred years after the settlement
of America by the English, beaver
skins were the main staple of com
merce between the northern col
onies and the old country. Literally
millions of beavers were slaughter
ed for their fur, the principal use
of which was to make men's hats.
Beaver fur is still regarded by hat
ters as the finest possible material
for felt hats, but there is very little
of it on the market, and the game
laws of New England today Impose
heavy penalties on anyone killing
the beaver.
the building industry and all of the
other industries that depend on it
FLYING
Twenty-five years ago only half a
dozen people, friends of the Wright
Brothers, had ever seen an airplane
in flight Practically nobody else
believed it Would ever be possible
to fly a heavier than air machine.
In that year, 1906, everybody was
enthusiastic about lighter-than-air
craft The balloon with a motor
propeller, what we now call a dirl
gible, was the thing, but nobody
dreamed of anything approaching
tne united states Navy's new air
ship, Akron, which took 203 people
on a ten hour voyage the other day.
In the last few years there have
been wonderful improvements in
airplanes. It is probable that every
plane flying today will be out of
date inside of ten years and that
the plane of the future will look
and act entirely different from any
thing we are familiar with now.
GARAGES
This is the time of year when
many automobile owners commit
unintentional suicide by starting up
their cars in tightly closed garages
and not getting outside as soon as
the engine fires. In the past twelve
months the New York State De
partment of Health reports forty
two deaths from carbon monoxide
poisoning in closed garages and
forty-three narrow escapes from
death from the same cause. .
It is seldom safe to let a car run
at any season of the year without
backing out of the garage as soon
as the engine starts. Some of the
deaths reported occurred because
the wind blew the exhaust fumes
back Into the garage although the
doors were wide open. Carbon
monoxide poisoning comes without
warning, as the gas is entirely
odorless.
It costs nothing to be careful.
For Rent 320 acres tractor land.
Write A. S. Akers, 1225 Campaign
St., Portland. 35-37
I n I rOK THE
Ol NANCY HART S
Oyster Fritters
Drain off liquor from the oysters,
boil a few minutes, skim and add
to it a cup of milk, two eggs, salt
and pepper and flour to make a
batter.- Have a frying kettle ready
and drop the mixture by spoonfuls
Into the hot fat, taking up one oys
ter with each spoonful of batter.
Oyster Salad
Drain the liquid from a quart of
oysterts; cut each oyster into six
pieces! mix with them one buch of
minced celery; pour over the salad
a dressing made as follows: Two
tablespoons olive oil, one teaspoon
salt a little made mustard, one
saltspoon of white pepper, a pinch
of cayenne and half a teaspoon of
pulverised sugar. Beat thoroughly,
and then add very gradually two
tablespoons of lemon juice or vinegar.
NOTICE OP BHEBIPP'S SAUL
Notice is hereby Biven that by virtue
of an execution Issued out of the Cir
cuit Court of the State of Oregon for
Morrow County, dated November
Egihteenth, 1981, in that certain suit
wherein The Federal Land Bank of
Spokane, a corporation, as plaintiff, re
covered a judgment against the defend
ants, Kobert tt. Austott, game person
as R. E. Allstott and Mary E. Allstott,
husband and wife, and against each of
them for the 'sum of Ten thousand Sev
en hundred and Seventy-five and 83-100
Dollars, together with interest thereon
at the rate of Eight percent per annum
irom the Twelfth day of November,
1931: the further sum of Five hundred
Thirty-eight Dollars, attorney's fee. and
the further sum of Twenty-four Dol
lars, plaintiff's costs and disbursements,
and a decree of foreclosure against the
defendants, Robert E. Allstott, same
person as R. E. Allstott and Mary E.
Allstott. husband and wife: R. E. All
stott and Dona Allstott husband and
wife; and Hardman National Farm
Loan Association, a corporation, I will
on tne Nineteenth day of December,
1931. at the hour of Ten o'clock A. M.
of said day at the front door of the
county court house in Heppner, Mor
row County, State of Oregon, offer for
sale and sell to the highest bidder for
cash in hand, all of the following de
scribed real property situated in Mor
row uounty, state oi Oregon, to-wlt:
rne soutneast quarter of Section
Fourteen; the North half, the
Northwest quarter of the Southeast
quarter, the North half of the
Southwest quarter of Section Twenty-three;
the Northwest quarter of
Section Twenty-four in Township .
Three South of Range Twenty-four,
East of the Willamette Meridian,
containing 760 acres,
Together with the tenements,
hereditaments, rights, privileges
and appurtenances, now or hereaf
ter belonging or used in connection
with the above described premises;
and all plumbing, lighting, heating,
cooking, cooling: ventilating, elevat
ing, watering and irrigating appar
atus and fixtures, now or hereafter
belonging to or used in connection
with the above described premises;
and together with all waters and
water rights of every kind and des
cription and however evidenced or
manifested, which now or hereafter
may be appurtenant to said prem
ises or any part thereof, or Inci
dent to the ownership thereof, or
any part thereof, or used in con
nection therewith; and together
with all the rents, issues and profits
of the mortgaged property.
or so much of said real nronertv a
may be necessary to satisfy the plain
tiff s luderment. rnnln anA tt..'-
fee and accruing costs of sale.
.. , . v J. D. BAUMAN,
Sheriff of Morrow County, State of
Oregon.
D19th 1931St pubIication: November
FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY
RED CROSS POSTER
BUILDING
The biggest problem that con
fronts President Hoover's confer
ence on home building, which will
begin Its session In Washington
shortly, is the problem of finding
a substitute for the present system
of second mortgage financing. Half
the families in the United States
own their homes, but most of them
have paid much more than they
should have paid, because of the
high cost of second mortgage
money.
If the President's conference can
work out' a nationally acceptable
plan undet which the young man
who has saved up a thousand dol
lars can buy a home without hav
ing to pay exhorbltant premiums
and Interest on the balance, it will
go a long way toward stimulating
rCH
"It takes a heap o'
pennies in the bank
to make it count."
But while the kiddies are ac
cumulating all those coins
from various sources, they
are being trained in forming
a habit that is worth far more
to thorn than cash.
Rich or poor, as a parent you
should appreciate the idea.
Get them a Home Bank and
GIVE THEM A FAIR
CHANCE.
Farmers
and Stockgrowers
National Bank
There to No Substitute for
Safety
DON'T
FORGET
We can give you a
real grease job or
fix that blowout in
a hurry.
Have You Tried the
New Standard Gas?
GEMMELL'S
Service Station
P. M. GEMMELL, Prop.
"Our Service Will Please Ton;
Your Patronage Will Flense U"
We carry of full line
.of
DAIRY
and
POULTRY
FEEDS
We have the right
feed for finishing tur
keys for the market
at low cost
Steam Rolled and
. Dry Ground Bar
ley and Wheat
always on hand.
Special Rabbit Feed
now in stock.
Heppner
Trading Co.
Inc.
PHONE 1482
HEPPNER
I .... l.
rjk v. V mark n
& vi f m - fH '
".?i.,..W.-l ! ill 1 :'!-
QU8058B
A PRETTY, twenty-year-old bank
teller of Phoenixville, Penn
sylvania Miss Margaret Wilt
served as the model for the Red
Cross poster this year, and thus
entered into the halls of everlasting
fame.
This particular poster marks the
fiftieth birthday of the American
Red Cross. The original poster will
bi' preserved- in the Red Cross mu
seum in Washington, and the repro
ductlons will undoubtedly be used
In 1931 when the on? hundredth
anniversary Is observed and in
20S1 and through the birthdays of
the Red Cross in all the future
centuries.
Joseph M. Clement Is the artist of
this effective anniversary poster,
which follows out the slogan of the
Red Cross birthday "Fifty years'
service to humanity." Mr. Clement
has a studio and home on old mill
property at Chester Springs, Penn
sylvania, and thus looked about the
neighborhood for local talent and
discovered Miss Wilt who has
posed for several of his works.
This caHs for two cuds of flaked
left-over fish and wto cups of oys
ters and two cups of white sauce.
Arrange these ingredients in alter
nate layers in a buttered bakin?
dish, and cover over with a cup of
buttered bread crumbs and bake
for a half hour or Tiiore.
Creamed Oysters
For tasty creamed oysters, plump
the oysters in a tablespoon of but
ter and a teaspoon of lemon juice.
Then remove the oysters with a
skimmer, keep them hot, and add
another tablespoon of butter to the
liquid in the pan. When it bubbles
stir in a tablespoon of flour, rub it
smooth and cook for four minutes.
Add a pint of rich milk. When it
thickens, stir in the yolks of two
Let Us GivejThanks
LJ!e?1.V'.1mU0,h be nkfnl for, Health, National Peace, a marked
?J. 5 "J0"111. PrUlty. and many more blessings to numerous to
mention. And again we are thankful for this community we serve, and
believe many people are thankful for this money-saving store where Ser.
Tic8. Quality and Saving. prevaU at all times for the cietomer.
REAL For SAT.-MON.-TUES.-WED.
SAVINGS jNOV. 21st to 24th, Inclusive
Fresh Vegetables
25c
29c
19c
BANANAS
3 LBS.
CEANBEBBIES
a LBS.
CELERY
Ho. 1 Bleached,
BU.
THANKSGIVING
TRIMMINGS
SAXES POPCORN
CAKE CANDIES NUTS
CHOCOLATE PEELS, ETC.
POWD. SUGAR
To top off that de
licious cake.
5 Lbs. 45c
COCOA
High quality Bulk at
a great saving to you.
3 Lbs.
CAKES
National Brand fruit
and nut cake.
Special
EACH
20C
COFFEE
MacMARR Some as
good but none better.
3 Lbs.
jMiuwain 1 1 r i
SNOWFLAKES 2-lb. Cdy. 29c
Cl 4l I THURSDAY, NOV. 26TH
WIUIC UlUbCU a THANKSGIVING DAY
PINEAPPLE
FANCY BROKEN O Large 2 1-2 ()Aa
SLICES
Size Tins
SUGAR MINCE MEAT
Pure Cane, fine
granulated.
100
Lbs.'
The best we have ever
had MAXIMUM.
$5,35 2.290
MILK
Darlgold or Federal
Brand, large tins.
SALAD OIL
Buy it in Bulk and PER QUART .. 35c
save almost half. pER QAL $J jg
SH-lb. Boxei Extra Panoy
Assorted Chooolate Cremet,
Nongats, Cherries, Caramels
and other eholoa pieces.
FANCY QUALITY MIX
CANDY
89C
-39C
35C
Many other varieties, all mads in the West's finest oandy faotory
TBENCH MIX
8 LBS.
0. C. CHOCOLATES, MONSTER OuTHS, PEANUT BRIT.
TLB .... ' a lbs.
Phone 1082 Hotel Heppner Bldg. We Del
iver
eggs and the oysters and heat
thoroughly, but do not boll.
Oysters on Toast
Put in a stewpan one quart of oy
sters with their liquid; when they
come to a boil put in one pint milk,
one tablespoon butter mixed with
two tablespoons flour and little
salt and pepper. Let it boil up,
then pour over slices of nicely
browned and buttered toast; serve
hot
Celery Oysters
Cut a bunch of celery into one-fourth-inch
pieces, and cook in wa
ter barely to cover for twenty or
thirty minutes. Drain, and add to
the water there should be a cup
two tablespoons of flour, rubbed
smooth, into two tablespoons of
softened butter. Cook until thick;
add one-half cup of cream, and
when mixture is smooth, stir in
celery and one pint of oysters. Add
seasoning of salt and pepper to
taste; cook unUl the gills of the
oysters separate and crinkle; serve
on toast or crackers.
Cold Weather
IS HERE
Let us pot winter grada
(Team In your trans
mission and differen
tial. Our Merit Electric
Gear Flusher the only
equipment in Heppner
of this kind sacks
ALL the old grease
from the gear cases and
flushes them with ker
osene before pamping
In the winter grade
grease.
HEPPNER
GARAGE
Gilliam & Bisbee's
VARNISH DEAL
Saves You Money
With every quart of
QUICK-STEP VAR
NISH at the regular
price of $1.25 per qt.
you get a 3-inch bris
tle Varnish Brush
that sells at 60 cents.
This Quick-Step sale
continues for 30 days
only and will close on
the evening of Decem
ber 17th.
QUICK-STEP is the
ideal varnish for
floors as well as for
all kinds of wood-
.work.
In addition to the
above we will be glad
to iurnisn you any
thing in the Paint and
Varnish line.
GILLIAM &BISBEE
ShellFish
AND
Oysters
ON OUR MENU
DAILY
afford a delicately
appetizing change
for your diet
Prepared to your
order the way
you like them.
MEALS AT
ALL HOURS
ELKHORN
RESTAURANT
ED CHENN, Prop.
Heppner Gazette Times, Only $2.00 Per Year
such LOW
ELECTRIC BILLS
our electric range
saves us money!"
l rfnCO
Mother's Christmas Gift
TMi nw Mun 1932 Holpoint rang In
whlt or ivory with pal applo-graen rrim(
glaining chrome finish lwitch. Equipped
, wirhwctu.lv. Hotpointfearurwi Hi-SpMd
Calrods, smokeless broiler pon, thrift cook
r, oleoma Mc temperature control and oven
Hmor. May be purchased on liberal terms.
"I've had my Hotpoint electric range five
months now. At first I was afraid I might
find it expensive to run, so I followed the
pointers of the Home Service Girl on the
economical use of an electric range.
"The first few monthi I could hardly believe our
electric billsl It eosti me just about a penny a per
on a meal to eook electrically. I notice such a
difference Inour roasts they hardly shrink at alL
And how good things taste-meats, vegetables and
fruits retain all minerals and healthful juices. I eook
potatoes, carrots, beets, and many other vegetables
the healthful, waterless way in ordinary kettles!
"Our Hotpoint range saves us money every day
both In our food and fuel bills."
VISIT OUR STORE SOONl Our Home Service GIH
will show you iust the Hotpoint Range for your
family and priced well within your budget.
PACIFIC POWER & LIGHT
COMPANY
'ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE"