Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, June 18, 1931, Page PAGE FOUR, Image 4

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    PAGE FOUR
HEPPNER GAZETTE TIMES, HEPPNER, OREGON, THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 1931.
2jcppnrr
THE HEPPNER GAZETTE,
Established March SO. 18S3;
THE HEPPNER TIMES.
Established November IS. 1S97;
CX)N80LIDATED FEBRUARY 15. 1912.
Published every Thursday morning by
VAWTEB and SFENCEB CRAWFORD
and entered at the Post Office at Hepp
ner, Oregon, as second-class matter.
ABVEBT1SINQ BATES GIVEN ON
APPLICATION.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Dne Year
$2.00
1.00
.76
.05
Months
Single Copies
Official Paper for Morrow County.
Tn trSiTsWl !sta T eTI
I tDltOKJAtlTl ASSOCIATION '
HEARST BALDERDASH.
1TEBSTER defines balderdash as
a foolish or pompus jumble of
words; sometimes jargon or prate.
The suggestion made by William
Randolph Hearst that the federal
government immediately appropri
ate five billions of dollars to be ex
pended amongst the four or five
million unemployed of the country,
appeals to those who are capable of
a bit of serious thought, as pure
balderdash.
To the spotlighters it was just
another opportunity to get before
the public. Many of these fell upon
the idea and endorsed it. They got
their names in the press of the
country. It was just another chance
to ballyhoo; to prate.
The scheme reminds us of the
story of the old timer in Utah who
saw a great opportunity to get rich
through raising cats. A lake on his
place was stocked with nsh. He
would feed the cats these fish. Soon
he found out he had to feed the fish
something and he began to feed the
fish the cats. So the fish ate the
cats and the cats ate the fish. The
money to be derived for Mr.
Hearst's scheme must come out of
taxes. The taxes must be paid by
the people deriving the benefit.
Where would we be going? Maybe
Hearst can explain.
Already the government exche
quer is being drained beyond in
come. Secretary Mellon and Pres
ident Hoover have sounded warn
ing after warning. The president
has demanded a curtailment in ex
penditures along the less essential
lines, so that larger appropriations
can be had for agriculture and oth
er absolutely necessary things; but
Hearst and his fellow spotlighters
would throw the government into
further debt, and for what reason?
Simply to boost Mr. Hearst as the
friend of the laboring man.
A great thinker once wrote: "Tell
the truth to the people . . . before
you assert that they can appreciate
nothing in argument but fallacies.
and nothing in language but bal
derdash." Hearst should know this.
Looks as though Hearst and his
ballyhooing crowd would pay the
government's overdraft with a gov
ernment check.
W. C. T. U. NOTES.
MARY A. NOTSON, Reporter.
In a recent syndicated article by
Arthur Sears Henning, publsihed In
a number of the large dailies of
the country, the question of taxes
was elaboraetly discussed. The
headlines indicated that the coun-
trv is hrpnlfinp" imrlpr thf hlirtien
of taxes. It is pointed out that
taxes have increased since the open-
ing of the World war fourfold,
while the population of the United
States has increased only 25 per
cent The annual income of the
peple of the United States has in
creased only 135 percent in the
Sunday Schoo
no Lesson gb
International Sunday School Lesson for
Jane SI
CAUSING OTHEBS TO STUMBLE.
Romans 14:13-23.
The Minneapolis Times said on
March 2, "Prohibition has come to
the froefront as the leading nation
al Issue." This was the opinion af
ter a poll had been taken. Admin
istration of Justice was second on
the list. Thus in giving attention
to the quarterly temperance lesson
you are but in harmony with the
popular study of the day.
Paul was writing to the Romans
from Corinth and took his Illustra
tion from things that were taking
place in that city. Animals were
killed and certain parts only of
fered to idols In worship. The rest
was meat absolutely good for food.
Many Christians objected to eating
meat which had first been offered
to idols. The Apostle says that re
spect should be paid to personal
opinion and a thing omitted for the
sake of the good in another which
might not be any harm in Itself,
lie gave as a good reason for such
conduct: "For the kingdom of God
is not meat and drink, but right
eousness, and peace, and joy in the
Holy Spirit." The question about
how much we will give up for the
sake fo asother centers around the
consideration of how much we real
ly love our follow man and desire
his greatest good.
In the case of the beverage, use
of liquor, the matter is decided dif
ferently, for alcohol Is always poi
son. History does not contain a
paragraph that credits intoxicating
liquor with a single achievement
that has benefitted mankind.
same period. These facts are
startling. I
He goes into detail to show how
the bonded indebtedness has in
creased owing to the war. He
points out, also, how the people
have gone in debt to build good
roads, to erect better school build
ings, and to make other public
improvements. He shows, too, how
much more we are spending upon
the schools for maintenance. He
draws the conclusion that to main
tain the federal, state, county, and
city governments the people are
paying out about one dollar in six
of their income.
Then he comes to the real mo
tive of the article. He complains
that the federal government is
spending forty million dollars to
enforce prohibition and that the
states are spending a lot of money
for the same purpose. He says that,
according to the estimates of ex
perts," the federal government is
losing annually in revenue from
liquor $886,000,000, and that the
states and local governments are
losing $50,000,000, making a loss in
revenue of nearly one billion dol
lars. And one would think from
the tone of the article that the wri-
ter was shedding great floods of
tears over the condition of the poor
taxpayer.
No question exists in the minds
of anyone as to the burden of taxes.
but of all the absurd and rotten
arguments put forth to point the
way to tax relief this one stands at
the top of the list Who pays the
enormous taxes to support the dif
ferent units of government now?
Anyone who knows the least thing
about the principles of elementary
economics knows that all taxes are
drawn from productive industry in
the final analysis. The producers
pay all the bills. The old and well
known advertisement stated that
"Jones pays the freight," and this
became a common saying. Jones
pays the freight provided he is a
producer. Jones pays the taxes if
he is a producer. It would not re
lieve the producers at all if one
billion dollars were taken from
them through the medium of liquor
taxes and licenses, but it would re
lieve the millionaires from part of
their income taxes. And it is the
millionaire "wets" who are financ
ing the campaign against prohibi
tion. Think of collecting one bil
lion dollars a year from the poor
unfortunates who have an appetite
for liquor! Think of the poor wives
of these unfortunates who would
return to the wash-tub to support
the family! Think of the little chil
dren who would go hungry and
poorly clothed because their fathers
would be paying the taxes in the
prices paid for liquor! Intelligent
people will not be deceived by this
kind of tax relief argument.
COST OF REARING
CHILD IS LARGE
Food, Clothing, Shelter Claim Ma
jor Expenditure; Enormous Sum
Lost Through Disease.
(From State Board of Health)
The child of today must be
thought of in economic terms, the
editor finds in making a study of
the Metropolitan Life Insurance
company charts. A man has much
in common with machines, build
ings, factories, and other industrial
equipment of which he makes use
in the business of living. Like them,
he has "construction cost" during
childhood while he is being pre
pared for service. The cost of be
ing born, of food, shelter, clothing,
health and recreation, education-
these are some of the expenses
which must be considered as part
of the "construction" of the human
machine making it ready for the
period at which it is expected to be
a producer.
If the average family income In
cne united states is close to ,ouu,
as charted, then the following table
Bels Iorul startling ngures.
1. Cost of being born $ 250.00
2. Food 2,500.00
3. Clothing and shelter 3,400,00
4. Education (minor items
met by individual fam
ily purse
5. Health
50.00
284.00
130.00
54.00
570.00
6. Recreation
7. Insurance .
8. Sundries
Total $7,238.00
The above figures do not appear
to include the very important ma
jor item of education. As a matter
of fact, they do, because, under the
heading of "shelter," there is al
ready included the item of taxes
which covers the parent's share of
the community cost of education,
as well as other items furnished by
the state.
While the sources of material
wealth are carefully guarded, hu
man resources are often carelessly
used and wastefully squandered. It
is a time-honored adage that health
is not appreciated until it is lost.
Just how much health is worth can
now be estimated in dollars and
cents. The average American loses
seven days a year through sickness.
Losses from sickness and prevent
able deaths are enormous. More
than $6,000,000,000 could be saved
annually by applying what is
known about modern preventive
medicine and public health. This
great sum represents the value of
the lives lost through preventable
deaths. The basis of the value of
human life must naturally be health
without health, earnings usually
drop. It is when the bread-winner
of a family is removed through ac
cident or disease and the mother
and young children must become
self-supporting that, first the de
pendents, and later the community,
realize the large capital value which
has been lost
Leo Gorger and brother were vis
itors in the city on Saturday. The
Gorger brothers farm a large body
of land out north of lone, and they
expect to make an average yield of
15 bushels per acre. Their grain
is now about ready for cutting.
Looks Like a Good Garden
TIME
Sjr
JOHN JOSEPH GAINESM-D.
"Simple" Laryngitis
By this term, I mean the sort of
"hoarseness" that has no chronic,
tubercular, or other complicated na
ture. Its cause is, sudden exposure
to extremes of temperature, or over
use of the vocal organs in an im
proper manner. Clergymen get it
frequently, and amateur vocalists;
children with adenoids, large ton
sils and those who breathe thru
the mouth, from nasal or other
respiratory infection.
The onset of simple laryngitis is
usually sudden; its duration de
pends upon the treatment employed.
When, in the case of singers,
hoarseness and husky voice ap
pears, REST is the treatment; per
fect silence, if it can be enforced,
may be maintained from 24 to 48
hours and will produce wonderful
results. Simple gargling with warm
water containing a mild antiseptic
such as boric acid, is good home
treatment.
"Croup," now seldom heard of, is
laryngitis in the simple form. For a
TT
(DflfHLO
bv Aanfi Hart
Strawberry Cup
Strawberry cup is an easily pre
pared dessert which makes use of
sweet berries in a delicious way.
Line a glass dish or individual dish
es with split lady fingers, and fill
in the centres with the sweet ber
ries and whipped cream. Serve very
cold.
With Mutton
Soak a tablespoon of
haricot
beans overnight
Cut the mutton
MS
Tor tto
; 4
u
PINKY DINKY
7 'X I M VAW TUPIP, of course)
3EE I WONDER I N0T, ' HAVE.
tP A CHICKEN TWO to E5E A5 16 A xM
k old eS JC;k VA PrL
r . WELL. THEN HOW DO
L MW -rucv L-lVP Awt I
" I k0$s 111
I frrir. . t'l::-y.:...y -..-...ylV1Y. ... . ,-. , f, T
This Year
I Sadhl.' - it's comw'up"
FAMILY
'HX M
long time diphtheria was called
"membranous croup," singularly fa
tal before the discovery of anti
toxin; the improved treatment is
little less than a God-send which
has almost banished terror of this,
one of childhood's most fatal mal
adies. The simple laryngitis of child
hood may or may not disable the
youngster. The hoarseness pre
cedes the loud, barking cough. The
attack may be cured in two, or
three days, by attention to the bow
els and hygiene of the child; min
ute doses of good cough remedy
helps to dismiss the annoying
cough; I employ one with a little
syrup of ipecac, to secure relaxa
tion of the skin and to favor sweat
ing; of course the little patient is
kept in an even temperature until
he is well; and his play outdoors
should be undertaken gradually,
until he is well used to the pure
out-door air. Lobelia is very use
ful in "spasmodic croup," but it
should be given under the super
vision of your doctor.
into small pieces, and fry them just
brown in a little dripping. Peel
and cut up a carrot, turnip, and
onion, und fry them for five min
utes in the fat the meat was fried
in.
Put the meat in a casserole or
stewpan, with a seasoning of salt
and pepper, the vegetables and har
icot beans. Just cover with water.
Bring to the boil remove any scum,
then simmer for two hours.
Two cutlets, or four if small, may
be cut from off the neck of mutton
and grilled or fried in egg and
breadcrumbs and served with mash
ed potatoes, or surrounded with
boiled macaroni and tomato sauce.
A Good Vegetable Salad
One of the tea rooms in a big
city makes a specialty of this vege
table salad: Lettuce as a founda
tion. In one lettuce cup a big spoon
ful of potato salad mixed with may
onnaise; in another a pile of diced
pickled beets. Then a slice of to
mato, a spoonful of string beans,
That Was a New
On Pinky
By Albert T. Reid
and two stalks of asparagus. The
whole is dressed with French dress
ing. Currant Biscuits
Sift together two cups flour, two
teaspoons baking powder and one
teaspoon salt. Cut in with a silver
knife one tablespoon butter. Grad
ually add three-quarters of a cup
of milk or enough to make a soft
dough. Place it on a floured board
and pat it to half an inch thickness.
Spread it with cinnamon, sugar and
dried currants. Roll and cut in
half-inch slices and bake in a quick
oven.
Left-Over Pork
Cut the pork into small dice. For
a pound of it you will need two
medium sized onions finely chopped,
two apples coarsely chopped, four
level tablespoons of butter, a scant
tablespoon of flour, a teaspoon of
lemon juice, a cup of stock which
may be made from gravy or a beef
cube a little dry mustard and salt
and pepper. Melt the butter iii a
stewpan and add the onions and fry
until tender and slightly browned.
Add the apple and fry unitl tender
but not broken. Sprinkle in the
flour and a small pinch of mustard,
stir and let cook very gently for a
few minutes and then add the stock
and stir while it cooks for four or
five minutes. Add the meat, lemon
juice and salt, mustard and pepper
to taste. Let it heat thoroughly and
serve with mashed potatoes or rice.
ALPINE.
MARGARET McDAID.
Mrs. Anna Schmidt and Mr. and
Mrs. Frank Schmidt visited at the
Crockett Duvall home near Nyssa
last week. The Duvalls have pur
chased a home about ten miles from
where they first lived. Then the
Schmidts drove to Hamilton where
they visited with another daughter
of Mrs. Schmidt's, Mrs. Legler.
Miss Bernice Heft of La Grande
spent Saturday visiting at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Klinger.
Miss Heft graduated from Eastern
Oregon Normal school in June.
Bert Michel is busy getting in his
hay. He has a pretty good crop as
well a3 some good looking wheat.
Mrs. Madge Doherty and daugh
ters Florence and Lucille are now
visiting at the home of Mrs. Doher-
ty's brother, Dan Doherty of Juni
per.
Mr. and Mrs. Neil Melville and
One
By TERRY GILKISON
Ac
HAT UTTLfc LAMP THAT
MARY HAP
WITH FLEEC ALL OEft T? FAGK
when weer ne dOTA treat
WHEN BAP HE 60T A , fAKJ
Charles Melville drove to La Grande
last week where they were joined
by Miss Gertrude Tichenor. They
returned home the end of the week.
Miss Nora McDaid and Miss Mae
Doherty left Sunday morning for
La Grande where they will attend
the summer school at the Eastern
Oregon Normal school. They were
accompanied by W. J. McDaid who
returned the same day.
Miss Rosella Doherty was a Mon
day visitor at the home of her sis
ter, Mrs. P. J. Currin, last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Schmidt left
for their home in California after
visiting relatives and friends here
for two weeks.
Miss Mary McDaid, who was
spending her vacation week at her
home in Alpine, returned to Pen
dleton Thursday evening.
The annual school meeting and
election of oflicers was held at Al
pine Monday, June 15. The meet
ing was called to order by Dan
Lindsay, acting as chairman. After
eading of the minutes, the annual
report was read. B. P. Doherty,
Bert Michel and Bernard Doherty
Jr. were nominated for director.
Bernard Doherty was elected. Mrs.
Bert Michel and Mrs. G. L. Bennett
were nominated for clerk and Mrs.
Michel was elected.
Rudolph Klinger, Doris Klinger
and Edna Rauch motored to Echo
Friday on business. ,
Miss Ilene Kilkenny of Hinton
creek came down Sunday to the
home of her cousin, Camilla Kil
kenny, where she will visit tor a
few days.
Dan Lindsay motored to Pendle
ton Friday where he transacted
business.
Miss Doris Klinger visited with
friends in Hermsiton from Tuesday
to Friday of last week.
Miss Doris Lamberth of Echo
was a week end visitor in Alpine
last week. She visited at the home
of her aunt, Mrs. G. L. Bennett.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
Notice is hereby given that the un
dersigned has been appointed by the
County Court of the State of Oregon
for Morrow County, executrix of the
estate of Karl L. Beach, deceased, and
that all persons having claims against
the said estate must present the same,
duly verilled according to law, to me at
the office of my attorney, S. E. Notson,
in Heppner, Oregon, within six months
from the date of first publication of
thi3 notice, which date of first publica
tion is May 28, 1931.
ELSIE M. BEACH,
11-15 Executrix.
NOTICE Or SHERIFF'S SALE.
NOTICE is hereby given that by vir
tue of an execution and order of sale
in foreclosure, issued out of the Circuit
Court of the State of Oregon for Lane
County, May 20th, 1931, upon and pur
suant to a decree duly given and made
by said Court on the 18th day of May,
15)31. in a suit Dendine therein in which
Jesse G. Wells, aa Trustee, was plain-
un, ana ine tiugene isible university.
a corporation, tt al, were defendants,
wnicn execution and order oi sale was
to me directed and commanded me to
sell the real property hereinafter de
scribed to satisty certain liens and
charges in said decree spedMed, I will
on inuay, tne 3rd any or July, iy;u, at
the hour of one o'clock P. M-, at the
front door of the County Court House
in Heppner, Morrow County, Oregon,
offer for sale and sell at public auction,
for cash, subject to redemption as pro
vdied by law, all the right, title and
interest or tne uetenuants ana each or
them in said suit, and of all parties
claiming by, through or under them or
any ot them since the 15th day of Oc-
toDer, iaj, in or to tne roiiowing de-
scribed real property, to-wit:
Tract No. 1. South half of Section 18
All of Section 19; Southwest quarter
of Section 20; Northwest quarter of
section 29; all in Tp. 2 S. K. 25, East
vviuameiie Meridian. lizsu acres,
more or less, in Morrow County, Ore
gon; Tract No. 2. Southwest quarter of Sec
tion d; isortnwest quarter ot section
10: Northeast quarter of Section 4:
all in Tp. 2 S. R. 25, East Willamette
Meridian ; 48U acres In Morrow Coun
ty, Oregon,
together with the tenements, heredita
ments and auDurtenances thereunto be
longing; subject, however, to a lease on
tract No. 1 In favor of Gene Gray and
a lease on Tract No. 2 in favor of
George N. Peck, both of which expire
iNuvcniuer isi, ludj.
Dated this fourth day of June, 1931.
C. J. D. BAUMAN. Sheriff.
Date of first publication, 6-4-31. 12-10
notice fob publication,
isolated tract.
PUBLIC LAND SALE. Department
of the Interior. U. S. Land Office at The
Dalles, Oregon, May 5. 1931.
NOTICE is hereby given that, as di
rected by the Commissioner of the Gen
eral Land Office, under provisions of
Sec. 2465, R. S pursuant to the appli
cation of Frank V. Chapman, Serial No.
027415, we will offer at public sale, to
the highest bidder, but at not less than
1.25 per acre, at 10:00 o'clock A. M., on
ine Bin clay or July, next, at this office,
the following tract of land: N14 NK'A,
Sec. 27, T. 5 S R. 31 E.. W. M.
The sale will not be kept open, but
will be declared closed when those
present at the hour named have ceased
bidding. The person making the high
est bid will be required to Immediately
pay to the Receiver the amount thereof.
Any person claiming adversely the
above-described land are advised to file
their claims, or objections, on or before
the time designated for sale.
R. J. CARSNER, Register.
NOTICE OF FINAL SETTLEMENT.
Notice Is hereby given that the un
dersigned has filed his final account as
the executor of the estate of Ray G.
Slocum, deceased, and that the County
Court of the State of Oregon for Mor
row County has appointed Monday, the
6th day of July, 1931, at the hour of 10
o'clock In the forenoon of said day, as
the time, and the County Court room In
the Court House at Heppner, Oregon,
as the place, of hearing and settlement
of said final account, and that all per
sons having objections to said account
must lile tho same on or before said
date.
S. E. NOTSON, Executor.
NOTICE OF ANNUAL SCHOOL
MEETING.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the
legal vaters of School District No. One
of Morrow County, Slate of Oregon,
that the ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING
of said district will be hold at the
COUNCIL CHAMBERS, Heppner, to
begin at the hour of 2:30 o'clock P. M
on the third Monday of June, being
the 15th day of June, A. D. 1931.
This meeting is called for the pur
pose of electing one Director for three
year term; one Director for one year
term and Clerk to serve one year, and
transaction of business usual at such
meeting.
Dated this 2th day of May, 1931.
ARCHIE D. McMURDO,
Chairman Board of Directors.
Attest: VAWTER CRAWFORD,
District Clerk.
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE.
Notice Is hereby given that by virtue
of an Execution Issued out of the Cir
cuit Court of the State of Oregon for
Morrow County, dated May 2fitn, 1931,
In that certain suit wherein The Fed
eral Land Bank of Spoknae, a corpora
tion, as plaintiff, recovered a Judgment
agunlst the defendant, West Extension
National Farm Loan Association, a cor
poration, on the 25th day of May, 1931,
which judgment was for the sum of
Two Thousand Five Hundred Fifty
live and O2-1U0 Dollars, with Interest
thereon at the rate of Eight per cent
per annum from May 25th. 1931, until
paid; the further sum of J200.0U attor
ney's lees and the further sum of $90.70
for costs and disbursements, and a de
cree of foreclosure against the defend
ants, Peter Curran, as administrator of
the Estate of Joe Curran, deceased;
Francis Curran una Jane Doe Curran.
husband and wife; Peter Curran and
Saralt Doe Curran, husband and wife;
John Curran und Lucy Doe Curran,
husband and wife; Michael Curran and
Fanny Doe Curran, husband and wife;
Mary Ann Curran, single; Martin Reid;
Jessie W. Dent, as exceutrix of the es
tate of E. E. Dent, deceased; the un
known heirs of Joe Curran. deceased:
also all other persons or parties un
known claiming any rigm, line, estate,
lien or interest in the real estate des
cribed in hte plaintiff's amended com
plaint, and West Extension National
Farm Loan Association, a corporation,
and all persons claiming any interest
in said real property or any part there
of, I will on the 27th day of June, iy31.
at me nour oi Ten o ciock A. M. oi saia
day, at the front door of the county
court house in Heppner, Morrow
County, State of Oregon, offer for sale
and sell to the highest bidder for cash
in hand, ail or the following described
real property in Morrow Countv. State
of Oregon, to-wit:
The Northwest quarter of the
Northeast quarter of Section Twenty-three
in Township Four North
of Range Twenty-four, East of the
Willamette Meridian,
or so much of said real property as may
ue necessary to sansiy tne planum s
judgment, costs and attorney's fee and
accruing costs of sale.
C. J. D. BAUMAN,
Sheriff of Morrow County, State of
Oregon.
Date of first publication: May 28th,
1931. 11-15.
Professional Cards
A. B. GRAY, M. D.
PHYSICIAN ft SUBGEON
Phone 323
Heppner Hotel Building
Eyes Tested and Glasses Fitted.
VVM. BROOKHOUSER
PAINTINO FAFEBHANGINCt
INTEBIOB DECORATING
Leav orders at Peoples Hardware
Company
DR. C. W. BARR
DENTIST
Telephone 1012
Office in Gilman Building
11 W. Willow Street
DR. J. H. McCRADY
DENTIST
X-Bay Diagnosis
I. O. O. F. BUILDING
Heppner, Oregon
Frank A. McMenamin
LAWYER
905 Guardian Building
Residence, GArfigld 1949
Business Phone Atwater 1348
PORTLAND, OREGON
A. D. McMURDO, M. D.
PHYSICIAN AND SCTBGEON
Trained Narae Assistant
Ofnce In Masonic Building
Heppner, Oregon
P. W. MAIIONEY
ATTORNEY AT LAW
First National Bank Building
Heppner, Oregon
S. E. NOTSON.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Office in L O. O. F. Building
Heppner, Oregon
AUCTIONEER
Farm and Personal Property Salei
a Specialty
"The Man Who Talk to Beat
the Band"
G. L. BENNETT, Lexington, Oregon
J. 0. PETERSON
Latest Jewelry and Gift Goods
Watches - Clocks - Diamonds
Expert Watch and Jewelry
Repairing
Heppner, Oregon
F. W. TURNER & CO.
FIBE, AUTO AND LIFE
INSURANCE
Old Line Csmpanlei. Real Eitate.
Heppner, Oregon
JOS. J. NYS
ATTONEY.AT-LAW
Roberta Building, Willow Street
Heppner, Oregon
J. Perry Condcr, N. D.
20th year In praotioe in Heppner and
Monow County.
HEPPNER HOTEL BUILDING
Office Phone 02, Residence Phone 03.
Heppner Sanitarium
TInvnitnl Dr' Perry Oondr
1 1UI1UII physician in charge
Oldest Institution of Healing and
Oldest Practicing Physician in Mor
row County: with the least percent
age of fatality and greatest percent
age of benefit,