Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, December 04, 1930, Page PAGE THREE, Image 3

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    HEPPNER GAZETTE TIMES, HEPPNER, OREGON, THURSDAY, DEC. 4, 1930.
PAGE THREE
CONQUERORS
A great merchant of my acquaint
ance, who Is a friend of Gene Tun
ney, told me what occurred after
the final Dempsey-Tunney fight
Gene, who never loved crowds or
was greatly loved by them, wanted
to get away immediately. His idea
of the way to spend the evening of
victory was to hide himself with a
few companions in a hotel bedroom.
His friend said: "Gene, you could
have done that if you had lost But
you won. You are champion of the
world. Whether you like it or not
you must pay the price of cham
pionship. And part of the price is
to be seen by the crowd."
In telling the story the merchant
enlarged upon the theme.
"When I became manager of one
of our stores I had to do a lot of
things I did not like to do," he said.
"When I became head of all the
stores my unpleasant duties in
creased. Now I get to the office
before nine o'clock every morning,
and a large part of my day is con
sumed in duties that are more or
less distasteful. The only man who
can do as he pleases is the failure.
Every step up that you take means
that you belong less to yourself and
more to other people."
As he spoke I thought of some
examples that have come under my
own observation.
The partners of Morgan & Co.
are the princes of the modern bus
iness world. If you stand outside
their building on almost any win
ter's evening you will see the lights
burning in at least a part of the
private offices. The lower floors may
be dark. The clerks and account
ants have gone home. But almost
always some of the partners are
still on the job.
I spent a day with Coolidge while
he was still President He was
supposed to be on vacation. He
fished a little in the morning but it
was the least relaxing job of fishing
that I have ever witnessed. A se
cret man stood at his elbow and
another kept watch from behind
the bushes on the bank.
Once, for a week, I traveled in a
private car with the president of
a great corporation. Every morn
ing we left the car at eight o'clock
and called on dealers in their stores.
We lunched with a group of them
at noon, and had another group
with us until midnight At mid
night we went to bed, to wake up
the next morning in another city
and do the whole thing all over
again.
It was a tougher week than any
laborer ever spent.
The big jobs look attractive from
a distance, but when you get closer
to them you find a large price tag
pinned on each one.
Some of us who have been close
enough to read the figures on the
tags find it quite easy to reconcile
ourselves to remaining quietly and
contentedly below.
POLITICS
Both major parties are tightening
their lines for the Presidential cam
paign of 1932. The Republicans
know they have a fight on their
hands to retain control of the Pres
idency; the Democrats believe that
if they can agree upon a candidate
acceptable to all sections of the
country they can win easily.
That is frequently the situation
two years before a Presidential el
ection. It does not always follow
that the "out" party wins over the
"ins." Having possession of the
machinery of government is a great
advantage.
At the moment it looks as if it
will be more difficult for the Demo
crats to agree upon a candidate who
can rally all Democrats to his sup
port than for the Republicans to
mend their political fences.
PROHIBITION
All the reports from those who
profess to know indicate that the
President's Commission on Law En
forcement, better known as the
Wickersham Commission, will re
port that the present Prohibition
law cannot be enforced, and will
recommend some changes.
There will be more serious at
tempts made at the coming session
of Congress to break down the
"dry" law than at any time since it
was enacted. There Is little likeli
hood of anything being accomplish
ed by the "wets" at this last session
of the 71st Congress, but if the
Wickersham report proves to be
friendly to the modification of the
present law, watch for fireworks
when the Congress just elected be
gins its sessions.
JONES
"Bobby" Jones has at last ans
wered the question: How can a man
play golf all the time and still keep
his law practice going? The ans
wer is that he can't. Bobby is giv
ing up golf, except as a means of
recreation.
It remains to be seen whether Mr.
Jones will do as well in law as he
has done In golf. He has proved
that he has the Important quality of
thoroughness. Those who know him
say he has a natural taste for law,
and high intelligence. He will not
have the struggle for existence
which so many young lawyers face,
for while his amateur standing has
kept him from making money out of
his game, he is to get a sum, reputed
to be a quarter of a million dollars,
for making a series of educational
films on "How I Play Golf." That
ought to keep him going until he
has established himself in law.
Probably Mr. Jones is doing only
what his class and caste instincts
and environment urge upon him.
There are still too many people who
think that being a lawyer is a more
respectable way of making a living
than being a golf professional. But
it seems to me that we have too
many lawyers now and not enough
good sportsmen.
BELASCO
David Belasco, a San Francisco
Jew who dressed like a Roman
Catholic priest, was the father of
the modern realistic drama. He
thought that people on the stage
ought to act and talk the way peo
ple do in real life, and that the set
tings and furniture of the stage
ought to make the scenes look like
the sort of places they were sup
posed to represent
Belasco's work in drama began
about the time Mr. Edison invented
the incandescent electric light The
electric light probably did as much
as any other influence to change the
drama from the old ranting pan
tomime into what It is today. It
enabled the audience to see the ac
tors clearly, and made facial ex
pression and careful make-up more
important than they had been.
Belasco was the first theatrical
producer to realize the possibilities
of electric lighting on the stage and
to shape his productions with the
new lighting in mind. Today every
body in the theatre business, includ
ing the movie producers, follow the
principles which Belasco developed.
FOOTBALL
It took the appeal of charity to
bring the Army and Navy football
teams together. For several years
the annual Army-Navy game has
been omitted, because of a quarrel
over points of sportsmanship.
When the two teams meet in New
York on December 13, it will be
frankly for the purpose of helping
to raise money for the relief of
unemployment Early estimates of
the receipts Indicate that they must
run to a million dollars, or almost
as much as the "gate" at the last
Tunney-Dempsey fight.
It is a strange but interesting
kink of human nature that people
will pay fancy prices to see a foot
ball game for charity, who would
never think of giving the same
JOHN JOSEPH GAINESMJX
FEAR
Fear lays down the bars for the
enemy to come on. Pitiful indeed
is the man or woman who lives In
fear of something which exists only
In the imagination. A state of mind
like that will, In time, reduce the
body to a state of confirmed Inval
idism. The scared man Invariably be
stirs himself to find a means of
keeping out of harm's way. He
will bite at every fake every nos
trum that Is heralded as a prevent
ive or cure of disease. He will dig
up his last cent to pay for some
thing that is dally dinned Into his
ears by radio, or spread before his
eyes In the blatant advertisement
... He keeps himself in. a state of
mental unrest, which In time will
lead to real illness.
If a shrewd commerclallst Invents
a fad these days, and resorts to
high-power advertising, he reaps a
harvest of shekels from the gullible
masses; and there are many shrewd
commerclallsts these days. A mil
lion lies have been circulated about
amount of money outright As high
as $5,000 was offered for a box at
the Yankee Stadium as soon as the
Army-Navy engagement was announced.
SUNDAY SCHOOL
LESSON
(ntarutloul Bund? School Lasson f o
December 14.
BAUI OF TABSUS.
Acta 22:3-15.
Rev. Samuel D. Price, D. D.
A person can be conscientious and
wrong. This was illustrated in Saul
of Tarsus, than whom there was no
more positive Pharisee. He was
devout and faithful in all that he
understood to be right
Saul had been especially honored
in being entrusted with letters of
authority and accompanying sol
diery that he might proceed to Da-
meats; more about good, wholesome
bread; as many more about the hon
est old coffee-berry; a million harm
ful positively damaging fads have
been set afloat by the promoters of
"health foods," to supplant the
countryman's honest square meal of
hog-jowl and greens.
Americans have a way of carry
ing everything too far especially
if they get scared into a "health
diet." Listen: there Is no better
"health food" than a contented
mind, a good country table and a
sound appetite. If I were giving
boiled-down advice, after many
years of experience, I would embody
it In a few words don't at too
much! Eat what you like, and that
means what "agrees" with you; It
means the food that you never hear
of any more after you swallow it
So long as you live along that way,
you are using the best preventive of
disease known.
Fear of disease will bring disease,
or, about the same, It keeps one un
happy, Courage and confidence lead
to better digestion, and make for a
better citizenship and a fatter purse,
TASTY,
FRESH
Shell
FISH
Eat them here now. Pre
pared to your order.
FOB A
GOOD MEAL
ANYTIME
or just
A LIGHT LUNCH OB
FOUNTAIN
REFRESHMENTS
ELKHORN
RESTAURANT
ED CHTNN, Prop.
mascus and bring those who con
fessed faith In Jesus Christ there
back to Jerusalem for trial. He
was in such haste to reach his des
tination that when he neared Da
mascus as noon approached he re
frained from the usual mid-day
siesta that he might the more
speedily arrive at his destination
and begin the investigation. Then
the miracle occurred that changed
his entire viewpoint
Above the brightness of the noon
day sun there was a manifestation
of the glory of God in the open
heavens. Others were aware, of the
vision but they did not hear the
voice that demanded of Saul "Why
prosecutest thou me?"
Glory from the throne had blind
ed the man who a moment before
ilWHOME VISITORS'
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W:. MILWAUKEE If
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PACIFIC
had been so sure of himself. He had
to yield himself to the hand of an
other as entrance was made into the
city. Then came three days of
meditation and personal commun
ion with the Lord, in Whom he now
believed as the Saviour of mankind
because of His redemptive work on
the cross at Calvary. In a vision
Ananias is directed to go to Saul
and naturally he hesitates until he
is assured that this once fierce man
has experienced a change of heart
"Brother Saul" is the gracious
salutation and this is suggestive of
the brotherhood of man that exists
through the right understanding of
the Fatherhood of God. Saul was
encouraged. Then his joy was with
out bounds as sight was miracu
lously restored to his eyes.
Charter Sarbee, Affent,
Heppner. Oregon
Few banks superior
to the Farmers
THERE are many larger
of course, there are some
more beautifully decorated
with rich and costly furniture
and fixtures.
But we challenge them ALL
to a comparison as to sound
ness and security.
Your local bank is in a better
position to serve you properly
than any other bank on earth.
Co-operation has made our
town prosperous.
NATIONAL BANK
There Is No Substitute for
Safety
THE NEW CMEVBWWLET SIX
Strikingly beautiful, fleet and smart
a masterpiece of Fisher styling
Never has the supe
riority of Body by
Fisher been more
strikingly exemplified than in the
Bigger and Better Chevrolet Six I
With the added advantage of a
lengthened wheelbase, Fisher de
signers have achieved in the new
Chevrolet an impressive degree of
smartness, comfort and luxury.
Inside and out, scores of refine
ments stamp this car as a mas
terpiece of modern coachwork.
Radiator, headlamps and tie-bar
form an unusually attractive and
distinctive ensemble. Mouldings
sweep back in an unbroken line
to blend with the smart new body
contours. And new color com
binations lend a new individual
ity. Interiors, too, are excep
tional. The new mohair and
broadcloth upholstery is smartly
tailored. Seats are wider and
more luxuriously cushioned. A
deeper windshield and wider win
dows give better vision. And
beautiful new modern fittings
lend a final note of charm.
Many mechanical improvements
are also evident in this Bigger
and Better Six. Among these are
a stronger frame; easier steering;
a more durable clutch; a quieter,
smoother transmission; and im
portant engine refinements.
The Bigger and Better Chevrolet
Six is now on display. See it today
drive it! It is the Great Ameri
can Value!
AT NEW LOW PRICES
The
Phaeton
The
Roadster
Sport Roadster
with rumble seat . .
510
'475
495
The
Coach
Standard
Coupe
Standard Five
Window Coupe
545
535
545
Sport Coupe
with rumble seat
Standard
Sedan
Special
Sedan
'575
635
650
SPECIAL EQUIPMENT EXTRA
MO
Chevrolet Trucks from $355 to $695
All prices f. o. b. Flint, Michigan
IT'S WISE TO t JlOOSE A SIX
Ferguson Chevrolet Co.
Heppner, Oregon
Thtt beautiful plated pancake
flipper with whit enamel
handle, color tipped. FREE
with your grocer's special
offer of
-M
)
PANCAKE &
cJarxed it Mt
(kodlkwkttphyjjifamt
FLOP
The flour specially prepared
to give those two qualities
women want most in pan
cakes and waffles Flavor
and Fluffiness.
Ask your grocer for this free
offer TODAY I
THERE ARE SMltfSTHAT Make US HAPPV
toy le 5. Robert the composer, on
the "Sperry Smllet' program over the
NBC every Tuesday, Thursday and
Saturday evening at 8i45 KFSD
KECA KGO KGW KOMO KHQ
ONE YEAR AGO TODAY
WE EARNESTLY ask you to compare the prices on the following
articles, many of them our regular prices every day, against the
prices on the same articles ONE YEAR AGO. We assure you there
is a tremendous saving to you. And QUALITY yes, we are proud
to say that we boast of quality, AND HONESTY and Satisfaction
with every purchase or your money refunded.
Saturday & Monday Specials
Dates
Sold in bulk.
New crop, fine
quality and
full of syrup.
2 Lbs.
25c
COFFEE
MacMarr the fa
vorite in the west
3 LBS. $1.00
COFFEE
Economy a real
good coffee for
the price.
3 LBS. 79c
Kraut
Libbys best, a
fine quality
sold in bulk at
a real saving.
2 Qts.
25c
Pancake Flour Sale
We have just received 500 packages and 100 10-lb. sacks of the won
derful MAC MARR PANCAKE FLOUR, a product of Sperry Flour
Mills, and to Introduce this most wonderful product we are putting
on a tremendous 10-day Sale
Dec. 5 to Dec. 15, Inclusive
t29c 10-ck ..49c
OLEOMARGARINE
A Swift & Co.
Product
3 Lbs. 45c
Prunes
Large Size, Inspected Prunes
10 Lbs 89c
25 Lbs $1.98
Short'ning
White and fluffy; sold in bulk.
Note the Price.
4 lbs 59c
OATS
Sperry's Full Cream in
No. 10 Rags
Per Sk. 49C
SOAP
Crystal White, the
Nation's Favorite
Laundry Soap.
12 Bars 49C
FLOUR
MacMarr High Quality Patent
Hard Wheat; Don't Mistake
This With Cheaper Flour.
49-LB. SACK .... $1.38
Chocolates
A Real Fancy Mix
2!4-lb. Boxes .... 75c
5-lb. Boxes .... $1.39
Delivery
All Orders of $3.00 or Over
Delivered FREE
Phone 1082
Heppner, Oregon
Honey
Pure Fancy Strained
5-Lb. Pail 69c
10-Lb. Pail .... $1.39
Beans
SMALL WHITES QQ
10 LHS. Oili
RED MEXICAN
10 LBS.
69c