Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, September 11, 1930, Page PAGE THREE, Image 3

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    HEPPNER GAZETTE TIMES, HEPPNER, OREGON, THURSDAY, SEPT. 11, 1930.
PAGE THREE
A
BRLICE-Bfl
CHEATING
Once upon a time I hired a man
to do a certain piece of work. He
was well along in middle life, and
I wondered why he had not made
more progress, since he seemed
honest and industrious.
I said to him: "It cannot be here
to watch this work and so I shall
have to trust you to do It as if you
were working for yourself."
He was profuse in his assurances.
He seemed to want the job.
, At the end of six months I visited
him. He had done fairly well, but
was rather glib with alibis. Other
people were always holding him up.
The weather was always very bad.
He would have done so-and-so if he
had been sure Just what I had want
ed, but I had failed to let him
know.
I put this down as the grumbling
habit of ah old man.
"At least he is honest and means
well," I said.
But one. day after about a year,
I happened to appear unexpected
ly. He was not in evidence. Upon
inquiry I discovered that he was
using my time and some of my ma
terials on a little private job of his
own. We had a solemn conference
and decided to part.
When you put a man on his honor
and then have him take advantage
of your trust it is a blow to your
faith in human nature. So I was
depressed and a little sore.
But only for a few minutes. Then
I said to myself: "How foolish I
am to let this thing worry me. This
man has cheated me out of a few
hundred dollars, but what a petty
thing that is compared with the
way he has cheated himself! All his
life he has held a nickel so close
to his eyes that he couldn't see a
dollar. All his life he has lived on
alibis, watching the clock, stealing
a little here and there from his em
ployers, and imagining that he was
doing well for himself.
"And where is he at sixty? Poor
and jobless, and a failure. Reaping
what he has sown."
The old idea of Heaven and Hell
was very bad because it made us
think that our reward or punish
ment Is coming to us in some far
off place hereafter.
In the same way most people mis
Interpret the verse in the Bible
which reads: "Be sure your sin will
find you out"
They say: "Lots of people sin and
are never found out Therefore the
verse is untrue."
But the verse does not say that
your sin will be found out It says,
"Be sure your sin will find you out"
be sure that it will settle down In
your heart and mold you in its own
Image.
That is a terrifying thought, or a
very encouraging one, according to
the way you live. Everything you
do had its influence on what you
are.
When you cheat you cheat your
self. And whatever you do that's
decent automatically and inevitably
I builds you up.
short time, something like that will
become a great industry.
AIRPLANES
For the first time since flying was
invented, anybody can now buy a
serviceable, up-to-date plane, com
plete with engine and all necessary
equipment for less than $1,000.
That does not mean, however, that
flying is about to become as popular
as motoring. For one thing, an air
plane still needs a lot of room to
take off and land in; It is not adapt
ed to the use of the city dweller.
Parking space for airplanes is not
easily found.
Nevertheless, young folks are
practicing flying in increasing num
bers and planes are being steadily
improved as to stability ana dura
bility in the air. Thousands more
lives will be sacrificed before the
safe airplane is perfected, but it is
safe to say that In another fifty
years the air will have lost most of
it's danger.
REST
A ten-minute rest every two or
three hours is a better stimulus to
continued efficiency than lopping
off an entire hour from the work
ing day, the Women's Bureau of the
U. S. Department of Labor reports.
Tests of the recuperative power
of the human machine have proved
that it takes four times as long for
the muscles to rest when they have
been worked to the endurance limit
as it does for them to regain their
tone after working half as long.
In one large New York publish
ing house there is a ten-minute rest
period at 10:30 in the morning and
another at 3 in the afternoon.
The same office closes down all
day Saturday from April to Octo-
ber. Its record of production Is
higher than In any office with which
its work has been compared.
Mental workers as well as physi
cal workers benefit by complete re
laxation at frequent intervals.
PLANS FOR YEAR
MADE BY GRANGES
Cooperative Marketing Stressed In
Joint Conference at O.S.C.
Last Week.
The advancement of cooperative
marketing throughout Oregon was
decided upon as a major grange ac
tivity for the coming year during
a joint conference of prominent
grangers and members of the state
college extension service recently.
Plans outlined for furthering this
project call for meetings of each
subordinate grange agricultural
committee In the near future for
the purpose of considering local
conditions and forming definite rec
ommendations as to what should be
attemptetd or approved In the way
of marketing machinery. These
meetings will be followed by coun
ty and district conferences In an
attempt to put the program on a
statewide basis.
Three deputy organizers were ap
pointed by C. C. Hulet of Albany,
master of the state grange, to su
pervise the district meetings. They
are Charles wlcklanaer of Board-
man for eastern Oregon, Arthur
Brown of Roseburg for southwest
ern Oregon, and S. H. Edwards of
Corvallis for the northwestern part
of the state.
The fact that considerable prog
ress in marketing had been made
this year by the granges In cooper
ation with county agents was men
tioned by Fred A. Goff, chairman of
the state agricultural committee ol
the grange, who pointed out partic
ularly the cooperative lamb pools in
Douglas county which returned the
farmers $1.70 per 100 pounds more
than they otherwise would have re
ceived. The lamb shipping activ
ities of the granges in Wallowa,
Union and Baker counties were also
mentioned as examples.
One hundred thirty-one of the
subordinate agricultural commitr
tees of the state grange, of which
there are 275 la Oregon, are carry
ing out some definite program of
agricultural improvement in their
communities, as compared with on
ly 86 last year, according to F. L.
Ballard, county agent leader.
Other grangers present at the
conference were Bertha J. Beck, Al
bany, secretary; Ray W. Gill, Port
land; Dr. C. H. Bailey, Roseburg;
Edward Shearer, Estacada, and
Walter M. Pierce, La Grande.
SHEETS
To determine why cotton fabrics
wear out the U. S. Bureau of Home
Economics has made a laboratory
test of 400 sheets discarded by a big
Washington hotel.
The results of the tests have been
submitted to manufacturers of
sheeting, who are trying to find
ways to make sheets which will
wear longer in the parts where
these gave out
Not a matter of great national im
portance, perhaps, but an illustra
tion of the way in which scientific
research by the Government aids
manufacturers and Incidentally
helps to provide the public with
better goods.
CONCRETE
In writing the history of human
progress a thousand years from now
one of the important milestones
which will have to be recorded will
be the invention of Portland ce
ment, in the early 1800's. The use
of concrete consisting of Portland
cement and sand, gravel or crushed
stone is one of the great advances
made practically in our own time.
It is still so new that all of its pos
sible applications have not been
realized.
An improvement in concrete,
making it at once lighter and more
nearly fireproof, has just been de
veloped. Tests by Columbia Uni
versity experts proved that it re
sists a temperature of 1,800 degrees,
and weighs less than a third of or
dinary concrete, bulk for bulk. It
is made by adding aluminum pow
der and soda to the aggregate. The
aluminum generates hydrogen gas
and makes the concrete rise like
bread, so that It takes only a third
as much to fill a given space. Two
Inches of the liquid mass poured for
a floor, for example, will rise to
nearly six Inches thick, drying as
it expands.
Fireproof and heatproof homes
will be regarded as necessities a
hundred years hence.
INDUSTRIES
Economists, statesmen and capi
talists are hunting for new indus
tries to take up the slack in perman
ent employment resulting from the
extensions of labor-saving devices
in established industries.
One thing that is being seriously
considered by one of the great con
cerns which manufacturesmechani
cal devices, is a machine which can
be installed in the home, like a ra
dio or a refrigerator, which will cool
the house, or at least the room It is
In, in Summer. In the laboratory
it is possible to do this now. What
is needed is the development of this
on a commercial scale, to sell at a
price within the reach of the aver
age family.
In time, and perhaps in a very
Go East on Union Pacific's
Marvelous Near Train
Portland rose
A Triumph in Train Comfort
INQUIRE OF LOCAL AGENT FOR DETAILS
LOIV FARES
END SEPT. 30
Final Return Limit Oct. 31
Liberal Stopover Going and Returning
UNION PACIFIC
WITH FARMERS
ABOUT THE STATE
The Dalles Eight specially se
lected strains of Los Angeles let
tuce have been planted In a lettuce
variety trial to be conducted coop
eratively by County Agent W. Wray
Lawrence and William Byers of
Fifteen Mile and Fred Tooley of Ro-
wena, in an attempt to find a strain
of lettuce better suited to local con
ditions than those grown at th.
present time.
Dallas A pre-harvest. Inspection
of the anthracnose resistant clover
being grown on the M. Van Groos
and A. R. Cadle farms of Polk
county showed an excellent stand
of heavily seeded clover with almost
100 per cent hairy stemmed plants
on the Van Groos place. The stand
on the Cadle farm was rather thin
and weedy, but the hairy charac
teristic was strong. County Agent
J. R. Beck reports.
Three room apt for rent with
separate bath and laundry room.
Mrs. Geo. Thomson. 24tf.
C. DARBEE, Agent
Heppner, Oregon
A New 6-cylinder
Chevrolet Truck
WITH DUAL WHEELS
Delicious Sodas
Milk shaken, sundaes and
other favorite Ice cream dish
es and drinks, as served at
our fountain, just hit the
right spot on warm days.
FOR A MEAL
or
SANDWICH
Day or night, drop In and let
us appease your appetite.
Strawberry shortcake and
fresh vegetables are Included
on our menu now.
ELKHORN
RESTAURANT
ED CHINN, Prop.
NEW
HEAVIER
REAR AXLE
FOUR-SPEED
TRANSMISSION
NEW LARGER
TRUCK CLUTCH
6-CYLINDER
50-HORSEPOWER ENGINE
Q 'mi
DUAL
WHEELS
FULLY
ENCLOSED
BRAKES
light Dlivry Chauh . '365
UoM Dlivery Chauit
with Cab '470
(Pick-up box tra)
Roodit.r Delivery . . . $440
(Pick-up box oxtro)
Sedan Delivery . , .... $595
lM-Ton ChauU
with Cab 625
UTILITY lVt-TON CHASSIS
$52
PWce of fVt-roit qhauil with or
wrtoout cab incudei front fenden
and aprom, running boordi, owf,
doth and completer equipped
Instrument panel, hood, head
lamp and l pa re rim.
DUAL WHEELS $U IXTtA
oa IH-ton modelt Including
pare wheel.
Ail price, f.o.b. Flint, Mich.
A new six-cylinder lVi-tori Chevrolet truck with
dual wheels is now available at Chevrolet
dealers everywhere. It Is big and powerful, rugged
and dependable. It offers many new features of
outstanding value to the modern truck user. And
no other truck of equal capacity costs less to
operate and maintain. Your nearest Chevrolet
dealer will gladly give you a trial load demon
strationany time.
IMPORTANT FEATURES
Dual wheels at slight additional cost, with six
truck-type cord tires bigger, heavier rear axle
completely enclosed four-wheel brakes new
heavy-duty truck-type clutch new, stronger steel
channel frame 4-speed transmission 50-hors-
power valva-ln-head six-cylinder engine.
CHEVROLET MOTOR COMPANY, DETROIT, MICH.
Division el General Motor Corporation
Heppner
Trading
Company
Phone 1482
GRAIN and WOOL
STORAGE
Feed, Flour, Salt
Wheat Cleaning and
Treating
Highest cash prices
for wheat and barley
W. L. BLAKELY
Manager
Save
Steps
An extension telephone
will save many steps. It '
will make prompt answering
much easier. And this conven
ience costs but a few cents a day.
Just call our business office, or give
your order to any telephone employee.
...
The Pacific Telephone And Telegraph Company
BGH.CL
It's Harvest Time for Food buyers at our stores! For we have gathered together all the finest foods
whether in bulk, bottles, packages or cans. You will want to stock your cupDoaras mm inese gooa
foods when you see their remarkably low prices. ouil nna mere s a -narvesi oi savings ww, awmv
ing you here during this sale!
Friday-Saturday-Monday Specials
SALAD OIL
Buy it in bulk and save almost
half; bring your own container.
Qt. 35C; Gal. $1.29
CHEESE
IEAM OREGC
CHEESE
5-Lb. Loaf . $1.39
FULL CREAM OREGON LOAF
PEAS
CORN
Tomatoes
6 Tins 85c
PER CASE
$2.98
SOAP
P.&G.
The white nap
tha laundry
Soap
20 bars 75c
100 BARS
$3.69
PINEAPPLE
GOOD QUALITY
BROKEN SLICE
4 Large Tins . . 89c
ROLLED OATS
SPERRY'S
FULL CREAM
9Lb. Bag ... . 49c
THAT WONDERFUL MAC
MARR BLEND Growing in
Flavor and Favor.
O Lbs. S1.05
PEACHES
They will soon be gone
BETTER HURRY
SPECIAL
99c
PER!
CRATE
(Hour
MAC MARR BLEND the
, Best In the West by Test
49-Lb. Sk. $1.49
Per Bbl. . . 5.89
MALT
American .... 39c
Puritan 59c
MACARONI
FRESH SHIPMENT SOLD IN
, BULK TO SAVE
6 Lbs
39c
PICNIC
HAMS
just arrived.
Fresh supply
, Med. Size
PER LB.
25c
. BEANS
Mexican Reds
RICE
"Head Rice'
Favorite dishes
for the kiddles
10 LBS.
79c
SYRUP & PANCAKE
FLOUR Combination
Large Pkg. Sperry's Pancake
Flour and 1 qt Stone's Syrup
Reg. Price 80c, Spec. 69c
CRACKERS
TRU BLUE Plain or Salted
3-Lb. Carton 49c
6-Lb. Carton 95c
LARD A"H::,$1.39 I Matches"S33c
Open Evenings Till 7:30 o'Clock tor Your Convenience
us ix&mn mum
Phone 1082
STONE'S DIVISION Hotel Heppner Bldg.
W I S I
T O
C H O O S I
S I X
I T