Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, June 26, 1930, Page PAGE THREE, Image 3

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    HEPPNER GAZETTE TIMES, HEPPNER, OREGON, THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 1930.
PAGE THREE
k'BRUCH3ARTON
No Profit on the Corn
Occasionally somebody visits my
place in the country who entirely
misunderstands its purpose.
"That's a beautiful lake," he says.
"You should stock It with flsh and
make money."
To which I answer that I don't
want to make money.
He is sure he has not heard me
correctly, and so he continues.
"Some of your land is pretty well
run down, but if you would put on
plenty of fertilizer for a couple of
years it would produce valuable
crops."
"I don't want to produce crops,"
I say a little louder.
He looks bhocked, but tries again.
"Why don't you buy some of this
wood-land and raise foxes?"
At this I am tempted to set our
dog on him. Our dog is symbolic
of the place. He is good for noth
ing. He barks at friendly visitors,
and once he slept soundly while the
house was robbed.
Instead of committing any such
inhospitality, however, I try patient
ly to explain that this country place
was not bought for profit, is not con
ducted for profit, can not possibly
show a profit, and, if it could, would
not be so dear to my heart It is
a beautiful, inefficient and wasteful
oasis in a rushing, efficient world.
Money is a grand possession, an
essential measuring stick. But there
are more people who seem to think
that there is no other measuring
stick, that nothing is justified unless
it is producing income, or increas
ing in value.
Such folks should consider the
lilies of the field, which sew not
neither do they spin; yet by simply
being their beautiful selves justify
their existence.
They should learn wisdom of
Henry Ward Beecher, who once
bought two little pigs for two dol
lars, fed them twelve dollars' worth
of corn, and sold them for ten dol
lars. "Thus I made eight dollars," he
exclaimed triumphantly, "on the
pigs." And added, "I never expected
to make any profit on the corn."
New York is my pigs. I make
my profit there. But I never expect
ed to many any profit on my home,
my children, or my place in the
country. And I never shall.
ZEPPELINS
People of the eastern part of the
United States have just had another
glimpse of that gigantic monster of
the air, the Graf Zeppelin. In the
teeth of terrific storms the great
German airship crossed the South
Atlantic from Europe to Brazil,
then flew northward to New York
and east across the Atlantic to its
home port on Lake Constance.
This trip, added to its flight
around the world last year, has re
moved the last doubt as to. the prac
ticability of aerial navigation, and
American capital is rushing in to
invest in the manufacture of Zep
pelins in this country and to estab
lish regular passenger and express
routes between the great centers of
population.
For high speed and comparatively
light loads the airplane will remain
unchallenged, In all probability. But
the dirigible balloon has definitely
arrived as a means of everyday
transportation.
GAS
The one remaining domestic han
dicap which makes women discon
tented with life in the country
towns is the necessity of doing their
cooking and water-heating with
wood or coal, which makes too hot
a fire in the summer, or with elec
tricity, which is decidedly expen
sive, or over oilstoves, which are
slow. For cooking purposes the gas
which city people use is concededly
the most satisfactory fuel.
A bank in Indiana, finding Itself
with a bankrupt gas company on its
hands, Investigated the possibility
of bringing in compressed natural
gas from Oklahoma. The experi
ment worked, and the people of
Linton are getting the new gas at
the old price, in the old way, while
the expensive production plant in
the town has been abandoned.
This seems to point a way where
by every community, however small,
can have its gas mains and use this
handy fuel as well as In the cities.
NEWSPAPERS
According to the American Press,
there are 160 newspapers in the
United States which have been pub
lished continuously for 100 years or
more. Of these, 65 are dailies. 95
weeklies.
One of the weeklies, the Annap
olis, Maryland, Gazette, is more
than 200 years old, having been es
tablished in 1727. Five papers still
In existence were published before
the Revolution. The oldest of all
dallies is the Hartford, Connecticut,
Courant, founded In 1764.
We are accustomed to think of
inn ,,, ooq nnilnrl at time before
which nothing of importance exist
ed in America. The evidence of
(V.Dao nlH nnwHIinnpl'S .helDS US to
realize that 100 years Is not such a
very long time. There were settle
ments West of the Mississippi 100
years ago, on such firm tounuauons
that the communities ana me news-
nnnsra oat n hi Iflhed then hllV6 flOUP
Ished ever since. Two newspapers
in Town nno In Arkansas, one in
Missouri, are In the list of these
centenarians of The American
m... and h rent have survived
because they filled a need of their
communities, the neea or iniei
and of news. Ncitlv
,n nr thn nut-nf-town daily
can ever put such community pa
pers out of business.
land, home of Presbyterianism.
The next step, still some distance
ahead but being considered with
great seriousness by church leaders,
is the reunion of the Methodist Ep
iscopal church with the other off
shoot of the Church of England, the
Protestant Episcopal Church in Am
erica. And some religious leaders
are looking farther than that, to
ward the ultimate merger of those
and the Presbyterians into one
gieat Protestant body.
AIR
Air and water do not seem to
most of us like raw materials of
industry. Yet one of the largest in
dustries in America uses nothing
else but the air from above and
around its factory and the water
from the river which flows past it.
This is the plant of the Dupont in
terests in West Virginia which ex
tracts nitrogen from the air by first
compressing the air until it is a li
quid, then mixing with it hydrogen
gas obtained from the water by el
ectrolytic decomposition. The re
sult is ammonia, which is the hand
iest form of fixed nitrogen, whether
you are going to use it for fertilizer
or for the manufacture of explo
sives. A similar process is to produce ni
trate fertilizer in huge quantities as
well as explosives for the Govern
ment at Muscle Shoals maybe.
When hay is shocked for baling
from the field it is advisable to bale
it as soon as it is thoroughly cured,
says the Oregon Experiment sta
tion, rather than allowing it to
stand in the field for a couple of
weeks. If waiting for a baler is
necessary, it pays to stack the hay.
Wanted Cooking on ranch by
middle aged lady. Experienced,
neat Mrs. Ida Hutt, Lonerock, Ore.
13-14p.
Court HouseaNews
BRIEFS OF EECOBDS FILED AT
COUNTY CLESK'S OFFICE
liiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiMiiHiiiiiiimiiiiiiimMliti:
Release of Mortgages.
First National Bank of Heppner
to John B. Calmus et ux, N 32 feet
lot 10, block 1, location NE corner
Center and Main streets, Heppner,
$650.
J. C. Kirk estate to Wilbern P.
Hill et ux, E, NSWy., Sec. 34,
NWtt and WKSW14, Sec. 35, Tp. 2S
R. 27 E; tract by metes and bounds
in Sec. 35, Tp. 2S, R. 26E; approx
imate location 6 mi. E Heppner;
W 6 feet lots 9 and 10, block 6, NE
corner Gale and Main streets, Hepp
ner, $4151.33.
First National Bank of Heppner
to Al Henriksen, tracts in Morrow
county, $17,514.31.
State of Oregon to Luther Huston
et ux, NHN, SViNMi, Sec. 2, SWy
Sec. 3, Tp. 3S, R. 24 E, 480 acrse,
approximate location 2 mi. N Eight
Mile, $2500.
Mortgages.
M. L. Case to Great Northern
Casket Co. promissory note $5000, 5
years, lot 4, block 12, Stansbury's
addition, location NW corner Gale
and Center streets, Heppner.
Hugh A. Conner to Bertha Cntes,
promissory notes $200, 60 days, $500,
3 years, tract by metes and bounds,
Morrow county.
Warranty Deeds.
Frank T. Hughes et ux to Nelson
H. Swartz, NEttNE'i, Sec. 27, Tp.
2 N, R. 24 E, approximate location
1 mi. N Ella, $10.
Bracher Timber Co. to S. K. Ing
ham, SWyNE1, BEViNWK, NE4
SW, NWttSEtt Sec. 7, Tp. 6 S, R.
25 E, approximate location 2 mi.
NW Camas prairie, $10.
Lelia V. MacDonald Curtis to
Bracher Timber Co., description
same as above deed, $100.
Circuit Court Complaints.
Credit Service Co. vs. Dennis Mc
Namee, seeking judgment for $229.
27 alleged owing on promissory note.
For Sale At a bargain, fifteen
foot cut Holt combine, Model 32.
Used two seasons, shedded when
not in use, and looks as good as
new. B. A. Amy, 211 Willow St,
Pendleton, Ore. 1216.
Clear Through
The Calendar
Hour in and hour out, year in and year out,
at dusk, dawn, midnight or high noon the or
ganization of this company stands alert to
give you unfailing electric service.
They are serious about their responsibili
ties. Making this service possible is their life.
They realize that at any moment you may
push a button and demand electric service for
an emergency. If it is humanly possible the
service will be there.
Back of them are high ideals of service to
which their company has held for twenty
years. They are proud of the work they are
doing, and hold high the standard of service,
every season of the year.
Pacific Power and
Light Company
"Always at your Service"
CHURCHES
Lone stops toward the union of
the different Presbyterian churches
tha Tinitnrt States, toeether with
the Reformed Church in America,
into a single denomination with
mr. than S.000.000 members were
taken the other day by the Presby
oHnn Oimeral Assembly. Such a
union recently took place In Scot-
SPECIAL TIRE VALUES
frw vniiv if j
ST'
I I ..J if It I lT
J - WAYVW
Genuine GOODYEAR Balloons
"THE WORLD'S GREATEST TIRE"
29 x440 (21). $6.95
29 x 4.50 (20) . $7.45
These are the world-famous ALL WEATHER TREAD Balloons
and bear a life-time guarantee.
This sale will end July 4th or when our present supply is exhaus
ted. It is positively the biggst value ever offered in Heppner. Never
before have these tires been sold at the prices quoted above possibly
never again.
Think of it! The famous GOODYEAR ALL-WEATHER TREAD
tires at prices lower than most second grade tires.
Many Millions More People Ride on Goodyears Than on Any other Kind.
Vaughn & Goodman
Heppner Garage
Heppner, Oregon
Save
30 Miles
When Traveling to
Yakima Valley
CROSS ON THE
Alderdale Ferry
Landing located four miles
east of Heppner Junction.
Recent road improvements
make this the
Ideal Route
LOW FARES
EAST
EFFECTIVE MAT XX TO SEPT.
RETURN LIMIT OCT. 31, 13
Reduced faresall parts of east; liberal stop
orcn. Fine trains; modern equipment;
splendid service; scenic route. Short side
trips enable you to visit
ZION NATIONAL PARK
GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK
RRTCE CANYON NATIONAL PARK
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK
GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK
ROCKY MOUNTAIN NAT" I. PARK
Information and Booklets en request
PABOFDE
BOUND TRIP TO
DENVER 7.e
OMAHA 7S.S
KANSAS CITY.... 7S.SO
st. louis ss.se
Chicago so.se
DETROIT 109.M
CINCINNATI 110.40
NEW ORLEANS...112.SS
CLEVELAND 1IZ.M
TORONTO IIS.BO
ATLANTA IM.SS
PITTSBURGH 1M.OS
WASHINGTON ...14S.86
PHILADELPHIA 14S.21
NEW YORK. 11.70
BOSTON M7.7
Chester Darbee, Afant,
Heppner, Oregon
The Gazette Times for Everything in Printing
Meals that satisfy the epicure! Meals that give your table an appearance
of luxury. Meals that are the very essence of the best in foods. These are
as close as the up-to-date MacMarr Stores where the finest m staple and
fresh foods await your selection. Prices are much lower than elsewhere.
Save dollars by shopping at your MacMarr Store. You can have inexpen
sive meals that SAVOR OF LUXURY.
Friday-Saturday-Monday Specials
Harvest Time
CANNED GOODS SALE
Corn, Peas, Tomatoes, Hominy,
String Beans
6 Cans
0 0 0
84c
Per Case 24 $2.94
FDIIIT6 Loganberries, Peaches, Ap- Dot aPal tlKt
TltUI I O ricots. Blackberries r CI MflU OOt
C.W.SOAP
More results with less
work
10 BARS 39c
ROLLED OATS
SPERRY'S EXTRA CREAM
OATS
9-LB. BAG 49c
FLOUR
MAC MARR'S BEST
A Sperry Product
49-LB. BAG .. $1.69
RICE
Good Quality
Head Rice
10 LBS 79c
BEANS
MEXICAN
REDS
10 LBS 79c
MACARONI
HARVEST
SPECIAL
6 LBS 45c
PINEAPPLE
Broken Slice in
heavy syrup
2 Lg. Tins .... 45c
COFFEE
Our Best
MacMarr Blend
3 LBS.
$1.10
ECONOMY An
other Good Blend
3 LBS.
90c
SOAP
PEET'S Granulat
ed for the wash
ing; machine.
1 Large Pkg
1 Small Pkg.
BOTH
39c
LARD
Armour's Ture Star
Brand
8-LB. PAIL $1.35
SALAD OIL
In Bulk. Bring your
container
PER. GAL. $1.35
MALT
American Brand
U TINS 89c
Puritan Brand
PER CQp
TIN 3Jj
Buckeye Brand
PER
TIN
65c
BACON
ARMOUR'S
Medium Weight,
Fancy Breakfast
PER LB.
33c
Open Evenings till 9:00 o'clock for your convenience
Phone 1082
STONE'S DIVISION
Hotel Heppner Bldg