Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, September 19, 1929, Page PAGE SEVEN, Image 7

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    HEPPNER GAZETTE TIMES. HEPPNER, OREGON, THURSDAY, SEPT. 19, 1929
PAGE SEVEN
L(Di)l IHIiippgnaMi
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Gilliam
drove in from Portland on Monday,
and after visiting here for a day
with relatives and friends went on
to Pendleton where Mr. Gilliam has
a brother and sister living at the
home of his aunt, Mrs. C. L. Keith
ly. Mr. and Mrs. Gilliam are on
their vacation of a couple of weeks,
each having employment in the city.
Mr. Gilliam is an experienced avia
tor, having received his schooling In
that line during the war and at pre
sent he Is engaged with the Adcox
Aviation shool, being Instructor and
at the head of the mechanics de
partment. He has supervised the
building of several planes.
Judge R. L. Benge, accompanied
by Mrs. Benge nad their son Terrel,
departed for Portland this morning.
After spending a day or so in the
city, they will go on to Corvallis
where Terrel enters Oregon State
college for the year. He was a grad
uate with the class of May, 1929,
Heppner high school. Mr. and Mrs.
Benge expect to be absent from
Heppner for a week or ten days,
enjoying a visit with relatives In
i Portland and other points In the
Valley before returning.
Mrs. W. P. Mahoney and daughter
Patricia and Miss Marjorie Clark
attended the benefit dance given in
Pendleton Friday night by the
Greater Oregon committee. Miss
Clark appeared on the program, of
fering a vocal solo. The proceeds
of the affair, which was pronounced
a success and largely attended by
students, alumni and friends of the
University of Oregon, will go to the
fund being raised for the new In
firmary at the university at Eu
gene. Some Improvements, long needed,
are being made at the Morrow
county court house. The outside
woodwork and other trimmings of
the building will receive paint, and
the several rooms on the first floor
occupied by other officials than the
sheriff and clerk will receive lino
leum floor covering to match that
in the hallways. Messrs. Henry
Kane and Jack Culp from Burns
have the contract for the painting
Job.
Dick Wlghtman departed Tuesday
morning for Corvallis, where he will
shortly resume his studies at Ore
gon State college. Dick is taking
the agricultural course, and he was
called to Corvallis at this time to
Join other members of his class in
taking charge of the college stock
that will be exhibited at the State
fair.
Alton Haguewood was quite se
verely Injured Sunday when the au
tomobile in which he was riding
turned over as he was coming down
Clarks canyon. A gash was cut over
the right eye and the physician had
to take Ave stithces to close the
wound. His left ear was also hurt
some.
Mr. and Mrs. Jess Safley and
three children, and Mrs. Safley's
mother, Mrs. Ida Maxwell, all of
Albany, were visitors here over
Sunday, being guests at the homes
of E. R. and C. D. Huston. Mrs.
Maxwell 1b a sister of the Huston
boys. They returned home Monday.
The marriage of E. E. Adkins of
this city to Mrs. Ollle Cox of Klam
ath Falls was an event that recent
ly took place In that city, according
to report made known to Heppner
friends this week. At the present
time Mr. Adkins Is engaged at work
at the Walt Rood place.
Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Akers are
visiting In the city from their home
at Portland. While here Mr. Akers
is busily engaged In painting the
dwelling houses that he owns, and
will remain at Heppner for some
time.
F. W. Turner spent several days
at Portland this week looking after
business. He drove to the city on
Saturday.
Smile With Ferguson
Mom.,
Swur
' MOHt
Harry French, who was down
from the mountain ranch on Mon
day, imparted the information that
it was still very dry exceedingly
dry in the mountain country. Up
to Monday it had been Just 93 days
since the last rain In his Bection,
and no relief has arrived to the
present date. That sort of a condi
tion would make any country dry.
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Palmateer of
Morgan were Saturday visitors at
Heppner. Mr. Palmateer, who is an
extensive wheatraiser of the Mor
gan country, is now awaiting a good
rain to begin the fall seeding. He
is also one of the farmers of that
part of the county who have gone
over to tractor farming and seems
well pleased with the change.
A delightful lawn party at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Case
on Wednesday evening, given by the
Epworth league of the Methodist
church, was enjoyed by a large
number of young folks. Games of
various sorts were played, and re
freshments were served.
Mrs. M. D. Clark and daughter,
Miss Marjorie, departed for Port
land on Sunday where they will
spend several days before Miss
Clark goes on to Eugene to register
at the university for the fall tfttm.
Sheriff Bauman departed this
morning for Salem, having in
charge Lorren Olin, who was com
mitted to the penitentiary by Judge
Fee on Monday, upon his plea of
guilty to the charge of forgery.
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Ferguson
and children departed on Tuesday
morning for Salem. They may also
visit coast points and motor on to
California before returning from
their two weeks of vacation.
Joe Batty, Hardman farmer, was
In town Wednesday. He was work
ing in his fields when the big clouds
of smoke began to darken the sky
Tuesday afternoon, and began to
think the universe was on fire. He
found later that the smoke was
from the big forest fire down the
Columbia river, in the vicinity of
Stevenson on the Washington side.
Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Spaulding de
parted Monday for Arlington where
they visited for a short time with
a son of Mr. Spaulding's before
going on to their home at Hood
River.
Mrs. Mary Bartholomew has as
guests at her home thlB week, Mrs.
C. C. Sallng and son Neil of Cor
vallis and Mrs. Hap Dooley and
Miss May Bartholomew of Esta
cada. Judge Alger Fee, accompanied by
Mrs. Fee, was in Heppner on Mon
day, coming over from his Pendle
ton home to attend to matters in
the circuit-court for Morrow county.
La Verne Van Marter, D. A. Wil
son, Ed Bennett and Jasper Craw
ford motored to Walla Walla Sun
day and enjoyed a game of golf
on the Washington city's fine links.
Quite a number of Heppner folks
are in Pendleton today, taking in
the Round-Up, but many more are
planning to be there on Saturday
for the last day of the big show.
Chas. Bartholomew, extensive
ranchman of Butter creek, was a
Monday visitor at Heppner, spend
ing a few hours in town while look
ing after business affairs.
Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Rodgers of
Walla Walla were guests over Sun
day at the homes of Mr. and Mrs.
C. W. McNamer and Mr. and Mrs.
R. J. Rodgers.
Mr. and Mrs. Guy Barlow of
Boardman were visitors at the home
of Mrs. Barlow's grandparents, Mr.
and Mrs. Stacy Roberta in this city
on Monday.
IT'S AGGRAVATING
to always take things at their
apparent face value. A teacher
asked her class: "If I were to
put my hand nt someone's pock
et and take the money out of It,
what would I beT" One of the
tots answered: "That's easy
you'd be his WIFE."
It's easy to account for the pop
ularity of
U. S. Royal Cord Tires
Their road performance plus
proven reliability are features
you will admire. When you are
In need of a new set of tires or
wish to replace that worn one
do not fall to come to us.
Try our oomplats auto npalr urlo.
If w. osn't fl it jau u.
Good Used Buys, Too
1M0 CHBVBOIiBT TOUTtlHO
1928 DODOB SEDAN
1M7 CHEVROLET SBDAJT
1928 PONT1A0 BEDAH
1936 FORD COUPE
UMAILLA PROJECT FAIR
HERMISTON
Divisions for Dairy, Pou try, Swine, Sheep
Rabbits, Honey, Home Economics, Ag
ricultural and Commercial Displays.
OCTOBER 4 and 5
Sports - Air Stunts - Football - Dancing
Premium List on request.
STAR THEATER
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY, SEPT. 19 AND 20:
WILLIAM HAINES in
"A MAN'S MAN"
with Josephine Dunn and Mae Busch.
Bill Haines comes through again with a perfect picture enter
tainment Another behind-the-scenes film, this time about Holly
wood, by the trio that made "Excess Baggage."
Also Inkwell Cartoon, Hodge Podge and News
Reel.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21:
GEORGE WALSH in
"THE TEST OF DONALD NORTON"
From the story by Robt Pinkerton. Blood talks whether It
beats in the pulse of animal or man.
Also Studio Pests, two reel comedy.
SUNDAY AND MONDAY, SEPT. 22 AND 23:
LAURA' LaPLANTE in
"THE LAST WARNING"
A picture that will chill you with it's spooky thrills as it warms
you with it's daring drama. The startling story of what happened
to a beauitful stage star when she and her stage company dared
the Unknown and came back to a long-empty theatre to revive a
performance that previously had proved fatal. It's more thrilling
than "The Cat and the Canary." SEE IT!
Also Comedy and News Reel. 20c 40c
TUESDAY-WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24-5
GLENN TRYON and BARBARA KENT in
"LONESOME"
A perfect romance of young love on a glorious holiday you
will cherish this among your fondest cinema memories. There are
only two persons In the cast, but thousands In the picture.
Also Oswaldf in WICK E D WEST.
COMING NEXT WEEK:
Jean Hersholt and Sally O'Nell in THE GIRL ON THE BARGE,
SEPTEMBER 26.
Marie Prevost In THE RUSH HOUR, SEPTEMBER 27.
Hoot Gibson in KING OF THE RODEO, SEPTEMBER 28.
Norman Kerry and Lewis Stone In THE FOREIGN LEGION, Sep
tember 20 and SO.
Born at Hepner hospital Thurs
day night, Sept 12, to Mr. and Mrs.
Harvey Bauman a 7 1-2 pound
daughter.
Born at Heppner hospital Mon
day, Sept 12, to Mr. and Mrs. W.
H. Helms of lone, an 11 pound
daughter.
Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Farrens were
Hardman people in the city for a
short while on Monday.
It is best to feed young calves
three times a day, according to the
Oregon Experiment station, as
young calves will utilize a small
amount of milk fed often to better
advantage than a larger amount fed
at longer intervals. Calves fed at
shorter intervals are also less sub
ject to digestive disorders, it is
found.
WANTS
FOR SALE Purebred Holstein
bull, 3 years old, high producing
strain. Chas. Benenel, Irrigon, Ore
FOR SALE Two ued low pres
sure steam boilers. Hotel Heppner.
27-28
Man wants job doing light chores,
or watchman. Inquire at this office.
27-30p.
LOOK!
FOR SALE New 40 Cletrac
tractor. Will take young mules up
to 9 years old up to $2000. Balance
terms. Tractor too small for my
use. If interested, apply this office.
Irrigated alfalfa and dairy ranch
MRS. W. R. POULSON
ACCREDITED TEACHER
OF PIANO
Now Organizing Classes.
Special attention given beginners
Call Apt 3, Case Apartments
of 66 acres for sale, trade, or will
rent to responsible party. If inter
ested call or write M. Farset Raid's
Planing Mill, Heppner. 21-28.
Orders for flowers direct from the
growers at figures leas than you can
buy direct Case Furniture Com
pany, growers agent Btf.
For Sale 700 head of young fine
wool ewes and April lambs, or about
340 mixed fine April lambs, also 6
fine bucks. C. O. Dinius, Rltter,
Ore. 26p.
6-Year Lease Three-fourths rent
900 acres 1H miles from warehouse
and school, 425 acres in summsrf al
low; stock and machinery to oper
ate; 100 acres free pasture; good
buildings; modern conveniences;
plenty of water. Inquire this office.
22tf.
Quality
ju years
Phelps Grocery Co-
The Home of Good Eats 1
The Slave
of Power
CONTRAST the present-day mode of
life with that which obtained centuries
ago, when human lives were held cheap
er than the products of the quarry;
when thousands of men were worn out
in the erection of the great structures
sanding as perpetual protests and re
minders of the sacrifices of human en
ergy that went into their making.
Contrast our present age with the
days when men were chained as slaves
to the galleys, pushing vessels of war
and commerce across the seas.
And even in later years the days
when not only men, but women and
children toiled out their lives in the
mines, factories and workshops of in
dustry. POWER electric power is now
taking the place of manpower, and has
made toil its slave.
Pacific Power & Light Co.
J.C.PENNEYC.
Store Phone 592
HEPPNER, OREGON
Manager's Phone 1382
SHE'S WILD"
But Our Prices A re Tame
RODEO
Cowboy
Hats
The
TOMMY GRIMES
An Extra Large Hat-
$7.90
LET'ER BUCK
Handker
chiefs Fancy Colors and
Designs
89c Each
THE
SAN ANN
is the most popular
shaped stockmen's
hat.
$4.98
Everybody's Rodeo
XWsiiTi?ifiissM,
LET'S GO AND MAKE IT A REAL RODEO!
How About That New
Fall Suit
FOR RODEO
A visit to our Men's Clothing Department at this time will prove
both interesting and profitable. Our new arrivals In Men's Fall
Suits have everything to recommend them style, quality fabrics
and finished workmanship . . . and an especially fine selection of
shades and patterns to choose from.
$19.75 to $29.75
Equipment
THE
Carlsbad
A Popular Shaped
Rodeo Hat.
$5.90
GAILY COLORED
Rodeo
Blankets
$2.23 to $4.49
LargeHats
FOR THE BOY
Inexpensive Rodeo
hats for the young
ster. $1.98
Cowboy Boots S. $10.90 - Cowboy Shoes $7.90
Ferguson Motor Co.
a