Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, June 27, 1929, Page PAGE THREE, Image 3

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    HEPPNER GAZETTE TIMES, HEPPNER, OREGON, THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 1929.
PAGE THREE
7Wf y ILLUSTRATED BY FRANK P. PTtyttWQ,
TENTH INSTALLMENT
WHAT HAPPENED BO FAX
Tne Sheridan Dramatic Club, of
which Tom Bilbeck, the narrator, Mary-
Cooper, his rival, are members, start a
. . r . riS'nauon ana uaiatea
at the Old Soldiers' Home, but are in
terrupted by a Are. During the re
hearsals Tom Bilbeck Is accused by the
.uouajiu w uue oi uie actors, Mr. Hem
ingway, of being in love with his wife.
Kldlng away from the scene of the
Ill-fated play In their costumes and
overcoats, the group of players is held
up by two escaped convicts, one of
whom is captured by Bilbeck after a
Btruggle.
The captured thief Is tied to a chair
. ""'"rem nuiiia. uimuie 10
budge, the players must stay there, and
Mr. Hemmlngway, hearing this over the
! no id ruining rigni w xne
ome as he is suspicious of his wife
and Bilbeck. Meanwhile the Sheriff ar
rives. Hemmingway arrives Just when Bil
beck Is assisting Mrs. Hemmingway,
who has fainted, and of course thinks
the worst. Meanwhile a disturbance is
heard in the cellar, and all in the house
rush down to it.
The Sheriffs horse has broken loose.
Meanwhile Hemmingway suspects Bil
beck more and more, and Jim Cooper
mixes In to tell Bilbeck he has arranged
that the Hemnilngways be divorced and
that Bilbeck is to marry Mrs. Hem
mingway. To get back home, Hemmingway must
travel by foot, and Bilbeck oilers to go
with him. In violent disagreement,
they nevertheless start out together on
snowshoes and skis and soon Bilbeck
tumbles over Hemmingway, the going
being difficult.
NOW GO ON WITH THE STORY
CHAPTER XI.
The Soup Bowl.
My skis went under him and I
went over him. It hardly seems pos
sible that an object moving as rap
Idly as I was could have been
brought to a full stop In so short a
distance. Hemmingway . made a
wonderful buffer. I was hardly hurt
a bit, and was very glad to cease
moving for a few moments with
more parts of me resting on the
ground than Just my feet.
Hemmingway scrambled to his
feet To my amazement, he held
one snowshoe in his hand and while
I looked he brought It down over
my head.
"You dang murderer!" he shout
ed by way of emphasis to the blow.
"What'd you try to kill me for?"
"Wh-what's that?" I ejaculated.
"Do you think I did it on purpose?"
"Of course! Otherwise why did
n't you slow up or Jump over me?"
I maintained a dignified silence.
What possible answer could I re
turn to a fool query like that? Why
didn't I Jump over him? Why does
n't Taft hold the pole-vault record?
When my skis were readjusted
where I had strained the footstraps
by tripping over hfm I proceeded
the rest of the way down hill.
Hemmingway joined me a little
later, limping.
"Use a long stick dragging in the
snow to make them go slower," he
offered contemptuously.
"How do you know?" I asked.
"Pictures," he explained tersely.
I recollected something like that
myself, now that he had mentioned
it. You remember the photograph
a graceful young man In a tasaled
cap and sweater poised in mid-air
half way from one rise of ground
to another, in his hand a long pole,
on his face a nonchalant smile.
A pole was what I needed most. I
thought I could manage the non
chalant smile myself.
I cut myself a branch of a tree. It
was a great help. I used It in climb
ing up the next Incline and leaned
heavily on it coming down on the
other side.
For the most part we traveled In
silence. Once we had an argument
as to whether or not we were pro
ceeding in the correct direction. I
thought we were right and he main
tained that we were bearing too far
to the left.
"To go due east," he insisted, "we
ought to head directly toward the
sun."
"No," I argued. "Not at this time
of year. In the winter the sun Is
quite a ways south. So, to go east,
we ought to keep the sun a little to
the right" i
I finally convinced him, or he got
tired of arguing. Anyway, we went
my way. I still maintain that we
would have reached Fort Oaks in
that direction had it not been for
the accident
We passed through a gully that
was pretty thickly grown up with
hardwood timber. It was a narrow
and deep dry wash and lota of snow
had drifted into it.
I had gotten across It safely and
was proceeding without looking
back, when a muffled cry of "Help!"
caused me to turn around.
Hemmingway was nowhere in
sight!
Slightly puzzled, I went back. He
had certainly been close behind me.
I found him In the gully up over
his head In snow. His snowshoes
lay on top, melancholy monuments
of his whereabouts. I looked down
at him in amazement.
"What's happened?" I asked
"How did you get down there?"
"I fell off my snowshoes," he ex
plained briefly. "I tripped, and in
trying to save myself I stepped out
of the loops that fastened the fool
things on my feet. I didn't realize
how thin a crust it was here or how
deep it was underneath It. It would
n't hold me and I fell through;
that's all."
As far as my experience went it
was an unprecendented situation.
"Can't you climb out?" I asked.
"No. Every step I take makes
the hole larger." '
I began to see the advantage of
snowshoes and skis for winter
traveling. It seemed hardly possi
ble that the same crust which held
us so easily with them on would
prove so treacherous when we were
deprived of our wide footgear.
'See If you can't give a lift of
some sort, suggested Hemmingway.
'Gladly," I answered, "but how?"
'Reach down with your hands
and help me while I get back on
my snowshoes. This seems to be
sort of a hole in the ground I am
In, and I think the snow Isn't so
deep where you are."
I acquiesced in his plan, as I
could think of no other. Reaching
down I gave him my hands and be
gan to pull up while he scrambled
wildly with' his feet
I sincerely believe the scheme
would have worked If my skis had
n't begun to slip. As it was he was
nearly half way out before my feet
shot out from under me and I land
ed solidly at the bottom of the pit
he had made.
How I managed to end up under
neath Hemmingway I can't Imag
ine; but I did with a lot of snow
and his snowshoes on top of both
of us.
"What are you doing down here?"
he asked petulantly. He spoke as
if it was his hole and no one 'else
had any right to be In It.
"I didn't want to come in," I re
turned angrily. "I was trying to
help you. The next time you fall
off your old snowshoes you can get
back on them all by yourself. Now
that we are here, how are we going
to get out?"
"We might tunnel," he suggested.
"All the way to town?" I asked.
"How would it be if I stood on
your shoulders," he suggested, "and
climbed out?"
"Why you on my shoulders?" I
asked. "Whv do I eet the star Dart
in tVila onrnhotln not? Tf vr.il cpt '
out, what happens to me? I sup
pose I stay down here until It gets
spring."
"You could wait until I got help,"
he offered.
"And freeze to death In the mean
time, I suppose. This Is a nice little
ice box you chose for a home any
way. My fingers feel as if they are
going to break off now!"
Finally we evolved a scheme of
tramping the snow under foot in
each direction until we discovered
what the confines of our prison
were. It must have taken, us an
hour to do it, but It kept us warmer
and gave us the feeling that we
were at least doing something.
We found out that we were in a
bowl-shaped depression with steep
sdles and a rounded bottom. It look
ed as if it would be a comparatively
simple matter to cllmh out under
ordinary conditions, but with the
snow over everything it proved as
impossible as for an insect to get
out of the funnel shaped pit of an
ant-lion.
"I think I've got it," Hemming
way suggested.
"What's your scheme?" I asked
skeptically.
"We will run around In a circle
down here," he explained, "each
time going a little higher on the
sides. The centrifugal force will
keep us from slipping until finally
we 11 reach the top. You ve seen fel
lows do that trick on motorcycles in
a racing bowl, haven t you?"
I admitted that I had, but doubt
ed whether we could go fast enough
to raise us to the top. However, jt
was wortn trying, and we started.
I had to carry the skis in my hand
and he had his snowshoes Btrapped
over his shoulders, so that when
we got out we would have with us
our means of proceeding further.
He started out ahead, and In or
der to keep out of his way I had
to follow. We were getting along
line and were half way up the side
of the bowl when Hemmingway,
who was traveling faster than I,
tried to pass me.
Honestly I didn't trip him on pur
pose, although he says I did. How
foolish! I wanted to get out of
there myself.
Be that as it may, he did fall, and
as he went he carried me with him.
We landed in our usual position at
the bottom of the bowl, hopelessly
tangled up as to arms, legs, skis,
and snowshoes.
I got to my feet as soon as possi
ble and moved the point of one of
my skis from John Hemmingway's
stomach.
"I hope this isn't broken," I said,
examining it carefully.
So do I, groaned Hemmingway,
for I want to break it myself!" He
rubbed the spot where the ski had
rested.
We tried the same trick again
and again, and always with the
same result One or the other of
us would slip and It would Involve
the entire party in disaster.
After we had done that for Quite
a while we desisted. We didn't have
any more wind left, anyway.
As we sat there panting I tried
to rack my brain as to where I had
been in a similar situation. At last
I remembered it It was In a sum
mer amusement park years ago.
There had been a depression in the
floor of one of the concessions call
ed the "Soup Bowl," out of which it
was very difficult to extricate your
self after you had once got In. There
was a trick about it the trick was
the only way you could ever get out
I racked my brains to remember
that trick. At last I did.
"Keep a little bit to one side," I
told Hemmingway, and wondering
but docile, he obeyed.
I ran up the side of the bowl as
far as I could and then turned and
ran stragiht down again and up on
the other side. I repeated this pro
cess several times, the impetus car
rying me higher each time, until at
last by a supreme effort, I scram
bled over the edge Into snow that
was only moderately deep.
A few momenta later Hemming
way worked the same trick. After
we had put on our skis and snow
shoes we started off once more.
"We were there so long," I said,
"that we have probably missed the
train."
"I suppose so," Hemmingway as
sented gloomily. "But there will be
another train some time, I guess,
and if we hurry we may be there
before It goes."
So we pushed on. We had been
traveling in the woods, so we were
a little doubtful about our direc
tions, but as soon as we emerged
we found the sun again and headed
in that general direction, bearing a
little to the left as before.
I was getting hungry, but Hem
mingway vetoed the idea of stop
ping at a farmhouse for lunch be
cause, as he suggested, we could
probably get a better meal in town.
He thought we must be almost
there, as we had been traveling
quite a while before we found the
soup-bowl, and it was only about
eight miles all told.
So we pushed on.
At the top of every hill we expec
ted to get our first glimpse of Fair
Oaks, but every time we were dis
appointed. It seemed incredible
that we had not come eight miles.
We had been walking for hours and
were all worn out
Still we were headed in the right
direction, due east toward the sun.
It was only when the sun set that
we realized our blunder. While we
had been in the soup-bowl the sun
had passed overhead; and when we
had taken our bearings again after
coming out we must have headed
southwest when we went toward
the sun and a little left It was ab
surdly simple when we came to
think about it, but I doubt if any
one not trained in woodcraft would
have done differently than we.
We had been going ever since
noon in exactly the opposite direc
tion; and by this time were three
or four hours' traveling from Fair
Oaks!
(Continued Next Week.)
Student: I have just bought an
encyclopedia and there is every
thing in it you want to know.
Landlady: Then just look and
find out when I am to receive the
money for your rent
Doctor: Is that a patient in the i
waiting-room ?
Servant: No, sir; he comes once
a month to read the magazines.
L. B. Leadbetter, wheatraiser of
the lone section, was doing business
in the city Monday. He is expect
ing a fair crop this season.
New York Life Insurance Co.
NOT A COMMODITY BUT A SERVICE
W. V. Crawford, Agent
Heppner, Ore.
John Day Valley Freight Line
(Incorporated)
Operating between Heppner and Portland and
John Day Highway Points.
DAILY SERVICE
Prompt delivery, rates reasonable
plus personal and courteous service.
$10,000 cargo insurance.
CITY GARAGE, Local Agent, Phone 172
There is No Need
For Your Home to Be
Old Fashioned
Y" 0U can have beauty, convenience
and comfort upstairs and down,
inside and out if you Modernize your
home.
And you can have these most desirable
things at low cost. Come in now and
let us explain how easy it will be for
us to give youth to your home.
We will gladly make suggestions, pre
pare plans and estimates and assist
you in every way possible.
Materially Your$
Tum-A-Lum Lumber
COMPANY
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A Good Time
July 3 and 4
AT HEPPNER
BASEBALL
lone vs. Heppner
Each Afternoon
DANCES
At Pavilion Each Evening
Cole Madsen's Band
OF PORTLAND
Y.
Jor
HEPPNER
To the MacMarr Stores, now the North
west's largest and most modern food
distributors, come the world's best
foods. And through combined mer
chandising service and purchasing pow
er these nourishing and healthful foods
are here for your selection at consist
ent, year-round savings!
Phone 1082
STONE'S DIVISION Hotel Heppner Bldg.
Heinz
IE FLAKES
A Wonderful Breakfast
Cereal
2 LARGE PKGS.
25c
Deviled Meat
LARGE SIZE
3 FOR
Jell wen
4 MOULDS FREE
The Better Jell
Powder hhl
Peanut Butter
FANCY BULK
2 LBS.
45'
"and piCKLES Yo Will like These Jar 23C
RAISINS
- - 4-lb. Bags 29c
SARDINES Booth's Large Oval Cans 4 for 49C
DEL MONTF. PEAS
Fancy Early Garden !
STONE'S SYRUP
Cane and Maple
Vi -Gallon 89c
1 Gallon $1.59
STONE'S COFFEE
Supreme Blend
3 LBS. . 81.45
SPERRY'S FLOUR
White Down
49-lb. Bag $1.89
Per Barrel $7.25
EXTRA SPECIAL
Marshmallows
PURITAN
5-LB. BOXES
This Is an unusual value on
Marshmallows. Don't fall to
take advantage of It
2 CANS
39c
PINK SALMON
No. 1 Tails
2 CANS ... 39c
PINEAPPLE
Broken Slices
89c
y 4 CANS
OPEN EVERY EVENING UNTIL NINE O'CLOCK
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