Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, April 18, 1929, Page PAGE SEVEN, Image 7

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    HEPPNER GAZETTE TIMES, HEPPNER, OREGON, THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 1929.
PAGE SEVEN
- i..... .... , i
Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Curran are
doing some extensive Improvement
work to their residence property in
southeast Heppner. Besides redec
orating the interior, they are mov
ing the garage to the rear of the
property and are preparing for new
flower gardens and other landscap
ing features. They expect to be
moved Into their home In the near
future. Among other improvements
Mr. and Mrs. Curran have installed
a new electric range and electric
refrigerator.
Chas. H. Latourell visited with
friends at Tillamook during the
past week, and while there enjoyed
some salmon fishing. He was ac
companied on the Journey by Geo.
Dykstra who reports a mighty fine
trip, though It rained a little on the
wav. Georra doen nnt (vmnirinr him
self much of a fisherman and his
luck was poor, but Mr. Latourell
lanaea a number or the big fish,
Egbert Young, Eight Mile farm
mer, was looking after business in
town on Saturday. Spring plowing
Is moving along rapidly out his way
ana Mr. young states the ground
works finer than it has for many
seasons. Some overly wet spots still
abound in the fields, but little in
convenience Is caused and in the
main the soil turns over easily and
pulverizes well.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Flatau of
Portland spent the week-end at
Heppner, visiting at the home of
Mrs. Flatau's daughter, Mrs. Miller
Huston. A son of Mrs. Flatau,
Ralph Boyd, also resides at Hepp
ner, being employed at the J. C.
Penney company store. Mr. and
Mrs. Flatau returned to Portland
on Sunday.
Walter Smith was up from Port
land over the week end, looking af
ter business at lone and Heppner.
He is now engaged in business in
the city with Joe Knappenberg and
they are putting out a tooth paste
that is reported to be very fine and
meeting with success In the promo
tion of a new industry.
Leo Gorger of the firm of Gorger
Bros., extensive grain growers of
the north lone section, was looking
after business here on Saturday.
Mr. Gorger is hoping for warmer
weather, assisted by a few warm
rains, which he feels will be just
the proper thing to bring along the
grain.
John Miller, who farms northeast
of Lexington, was here on Monday
accompanied by Mrs. Miller and
their young son. He is one of the
wheatraisers of that section turn
ing from mule power to tractor
farming, having recently purchased
an International machine to do the
work.
Mr. and Mrs. S. T. Roblson of
Eight Mile were visitors (here on
Saturday. Mrs. Roblson Is teacher
of the Willow Way school, and
came to the city to take in the dec
lamation contest.
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Cohn departed
by motor for Ellensburg, Wash., on
Sunday for a visit of several days
at the home of Mrs. Conn's rela
tives. John S. Johnson, living north of
lone, was In this city on Saturday
for a short time, while looking after
business.
Austin Smith and wife were week
end visitors at the home of Mr.
Smith's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Mack
Smith in this city. They now re
side at The Dalles where Mr. Smith
is engaged in running a service station.
j-usirict Attorney poison was a
visitor at Pendleton yesterday. He
went over to consult with Judge
Fee on legal matters, and also to
attend a meeting of the bar asso
ciation for the 6th Judicial district
Glenn Corey and Ashford Maddox
of The Dalles made an official visit
to the local office of Pacific Power
& Light company on Friday. The
former is district manager and the
latter chief clerk of the company.
Clyde Wright of Rhea creek was
in town on Monday. He reports
considerable raise In the waters of
the creek as a result of the warm
wind of Sunday which melted the
snow on the foothills.
Mr. and Mrs. M. R. Morgan and
Mrs. Frank Engleman were lone
folks In Heppner on Saturday af
ternoon and evening to take in the
declamatory contest
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Anderson
have nbeen enjoying a visit from
their daughter, Mrs. Charles Crltes,
of Newberg, at their farm home on
Eight Mile.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Young, of
lone, were In the city on Saturday
to attend the declamation contest
at the school auditorium.
Chas. Edwards, was in the city
from his home on Butter creek
Tuesday, enjoying greeting his old-
time Heppner friends.
R. M. Akers, lone merchant, ac
companied by two .sons and David
H. Grabill, spent a few hours here
on Monday.
Named For All Time
Two Lexington Men Get
Mention for Mythical
0. S. C. Eleven.
ST. PATRICK'S CHURCH.
Rev. Thomas J. Brady, Pastor.
Next Sunday the only mass in
Heppner will be at 8 o'clock and not
at 8:30 as usual, the reason for this
half hour advance Is that the pastor
will go to Boardman immediately
after the second mass there at 11
o'clock in Root's hall. There will
be no evening devotions In Heppner
on that day as the pastor will re
main in Boardman to attend to cer
tain matters in connection with the
crecton of the new church there.
The entire Boardman congregation
is expected to assist at this meet
ing. Plans will be laid for constuc
tlon work upon the new church
which will be called St Mary's
Church of the Immaculate Concep
tion. On next Saturday morning there
will be mass in the church in Hepp
ner In preparation for first holy
communion of the children, and for
confirmation. This mass will be at
7 o'clock In the mornng and will be
followed by instruction in Christian
Doctrine.
The congregation extends its
prayerful sympathy and condolence
to Mr. and Mrs. Peter Farley and
their immediate relatives, over the
death of little William Farley who
passed away in Pendleton April 13,
and who was buried from the
church in Heppner at 2 o'clock in
the afternoon of Monday, April 15.
A high mass had been offered by
the pastor on Monday at 8 o'clock,'
before a large and devout crowd.
I'Ult our Special Spring
Shotting note bring hrld
A
TWOS
s new and different
now as it was when
introduced
Recall the scene. A New Oakland All
Anicrican Six. Making its bow to the
public. And now you see it here . . . there
. . . everywhere you go. Other cars have
appeared in bewildering succession.
But the distinction of the All-Amcrican
continues . . . unaffected. It's as new
and refreshingly different today as it was
when introduced. Like a good friend
... it grows on you . . . impressing you more
favorably with every passing week. The
better you know it the more you will re
spect the NewOakland All-American Six.
Prlo. $1145 to 1575,. o. b. Pontine, Michigan, pine delivery charge.
Spring cover and Lovejoy Hydraulic Shock Ahnorbere Included In
Ut price. Bumper and rear fender guard extra, iirneral Motor
Ttma Payment Plan available at minimum rate.
Consider the delivered price as well ns the list price when
comparing automobile values.
Oakland-PnntlniT dllvrd prlnaa Inelud only mMubla nliaig
for dativvry and financing.
FERGUSON MOTOR CO.
OkMw OAKLAND
ALL-AMERICAN SIX
PRODUCT Or GENERAL MOTORS
i
Dallas "Sal" Ward, '27
mm
I r. sii
Percy Jarmon, Butter creek
stockman, was a visitor here on
Monday.
Try a Gazette Times Want Ad.
WANTS
FOR SALE Pure bred Rhode Is
land eggs, from hitrh Droducinc
strain. 75c setting. Ralph Butler,
uecii, ure. 5-8
Orders for flowers direct from the
growers at figures less than you can
buy direct Case Furniture Com
pany, growers agent. 5tf.
Harvey "Pap Hayseed" McAIister, '97
"hen Harvey McAIister attended
Oregon State college he was known
as "Pan Havseed." and thnnch h
played football there in the 90's he
is still remembered as one of the
best centers ever produced at the
college. He may be a trifle fleshier
now than he was at the time the ac
companying Dlcture was tnUen
thirty-odd years wreaking their
change In physique as they have
made the football of today a dif
ferent same from that nf th nn'
Still who would mistake the like
ness of the stalwart Lexington
youth?
Oscar Arnberg, '29, has made an
attempt to pick an all-time Oregon
State college football team from in
terviews with men who have been
In close touch with campus teams
over a long period of years. In tell
ing the results in the current issue
of the Oregon State Monthly, he
says:
"Every age can not have its How
ard Maple for a quarterback nor
can every Oregon State eleven have
its Pap Hayseed for a center. But
the combination of years can have
its combination of Maple, Pap Hay
seed (Harvey McAIister), and Chris
man, and Keck and Hubbard and
so on that will together form an
eleven that could be practically In
vincible. "Just why no one has heretofore
picked an all-time Oregon State
football team' is not known unless It
is the fear of the consequences. For
each college generation has had Its
bright lights in the football firma
ment and each generation jealously
maintains its luminaries were the
brightest Yet McAIister played in
the 90's while Maple did not hold
the stage untli the late 20's, but
each was supreme in his depart
ment" Lexington was not content with
producing Pap Hayseed to make a
niche in the O. S. C. football hall of
fame. "Dal" Ward, who played with
many of the same bunch who treat
ed the New York Violets to the
famous 1928 Thanksgiving party,
and who is mentioned for a place
at end on the mythcal all-time team,
also hails from our neighboring
city.
STAR THEATER
THURSDAY, APRIL 18:
VAL HOWLAND (The Galloping Swede Co.) in
"SPEEDY SWEDE"
A Laugh Every Day Keeps the Doctor away is a saying you oft
times hoar; for the fun that you need, see this "Speedy Swede,''
and get enough laughs for a year.
NEW Comedy Monologues, Popular Parodies on "Sonny Boy" and
"Rainbow "Round My Shoulder," and Vaudeville,
AND
Allan Hale, Rene Adoree, Fred Kohler and Clyde Cook In
. "THE SPEILER"
Love, drama, thrills, comedy in this splendid saga of the carnivals.
You'll enjoy every foot of this great film.
FRIDAY, APRIL 19:
VAL HOWLAND IN COMPLETE CHANGE
OF PROGRAM, BOTH VAUDEVILLE
AND PICTURES
AND
AESOP'S FABLE, NEWS REEL, HODGE
PODGE, and "PARLOR PESTS,"
two reel comedy.
SATURDAY, APRIL 20: 7
VAL HOWLAND IN COMPLETE CHANGE
OF PROGRAM, BOTH VAUDEVILLE
AND PICTURES
AND
Eddie Quillan and Alberta Vaughn in
"NOISY NEIGHBORS"
A "Ham" nctor and a Dixie Belle. Love, hate, sing and laugh
with them.
H"""t imtiiitii iiitim i iimimmiimimiimt hiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiimiii
I SPECIAL SCHOOL TICKET
TO SEE
I Val Howland and Company in
SPECIAL CHILDREN'S MATINEE
A Rip Roaring Comedy Stage Play
THIS TICKET AND 10c WILL ADIMT ANY GRADE
SCHOLAR TO THE
1 AT THE
I Star Theater, Saturday, April 20, 2:30 p. m.
aillllltlllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIItilMiiHitliiiiiiiHIIIIHIIUIMIMIIIIIItlMIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIII MIIMIIMMHIIUft
SUNDAY AND MONDAY, APRIL 21 AND 22:
CLARA BOW In
"THE FLEET'S IN"
Step fast, sailor. There's no waiting for this one. You'll be docked
a lot of laughs if you miss the first boat When "The Fleet's In"
Clara steps right out. Her ship of joy's come In at last and laugh
ter is the order of the day.
Also Comedy and News Reel. Children 2()e Adults 40c
TUESDAY-WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23 and 24:
IRENE RICH In
"POWDER MY BACK"
with Audrey Ferris, Andre Beranger and Carroll Nye.
Temperamental Actress Starts Teapot Tempest. Mayor Closes
Show. Actress Vamps Mayor.
Also "SPLASHING THROUGH," two reel Colleglntc Comedy.
. COMING NEXT WEEK:
Marlon Nixon In GERALDINE, April 2S and 28.
Rex Bell and Patsy O'Leary in THE GIRL-SHY COWBOY, Apr. 27.
Marlon Davlcs and William Haines In SHOW PEOPLE, April 28-29.
Helene Chadwlck In WOMEN WHO DARE, April 20-MAY 1.
FOR SALE 10 head of work
mules, some young, others older,
good size: harness to cn with nni.
mals; all for $650. John Miller
Lexington, Ore. 5-6
For Sale 1925 Ford touring, '29
license and trailer. Inquire Hepp
ner Bakery. 5p
For Sale Duck and White Wy
andotte eggs for hatching. Box 65,
Heppner, Ore. 5p.
Seed Potatoes for Sale Earliest
of All. At my mountain ranch. Har
ry French, Hardman, Ore. 3tf.
For Sale Weanling pigs. Lowell
Spagle, Boardman, Ore. 4-5p.
have anything in this line to dis
pose of; we pay all the market af
fords and can use your produce.
46-tf. Central Market, Heppner.
For Sale Creek ranch of 800
acres; creek bottom under ditch;
nearly ail plane fenced sheep-tight;
comfortable buildings with running
water In house; small orchard. D.
E. Oilman, Heppner, Ore. J8tf.
For Sale Alfalfa seed, common
machine run, 15c lb. Mail orders
properly cared for. L. O. Smith,
Boardman. Bltf.
Dr. Clarke, of Portland, EYE
SIGHT SPECIALIST, in Heppner,
TWO days, Sun. and Mon., April 14
and 15, at Hotel Heppner. Consult
ation free. 3-4.
For Sale Brbnze turkey eggs,
25c each. Mrs. Wm. McCarty, Echo,
Oregon. 3-7p,
ATTENTION!
Farmers and ranchmen, we want
your stock hogs, fat hogs, chickens,
turkeys or other poultry, veal or
beef. Come and see us when vou
Results of Thinking
Benefits from never wasting anything
are clearly emphasized if we, a as scient
ist would, think about the matter, consider
our condition and possibilities of "arriv
ing" if we are prudent.
Just notice how people who save reg
ularly do succeed.
Farmers & Stockgrowers National
Heppner Bflllk Oregon
J.C.PENNEY C.
HEPPNER, OREGON
Values for the Man
and for the Boy, Too
That Spell Real Economy
"Compass"
Work Shiru
Coat style,
made of heavy
mercerized blue
or grey chim
bray or khaki
jean. Triple
stitched bodies.
98c
"Ox-ffide"
Overalls for Men
back or
Six roomy
89c
WfWM
"Pay-Day"
Overalls lor
Men
Union Made, of
120 blue denim.
Triple ititched
throughout with
1 1 x bar - tacked
pockets.
3 $1.29
"Big Mac"
Work ShirtJ
Cut big and
roomy, of fine
and coarse
yarn cham-
b r a y. Ia
slim, regu
lar and ex
tra sizes.
69c
Night Shirts
For Men
Made of our own "Hon
or Muslin." Cat extra full,
assuring plenty of body,
shoulder and arm room. 54
inches long. Outstanding
value, at
98c
Men's Athletic
Union Suits
Of nainsook, full cut and
durably made. Big value
49c
Wash Suits
Button-on Models
Practical because tub-fast
and sturdily made of quality
fabrics. And mothers will like
the assorted patterns and ap
pealing style treatments.
98c and 1,98
Fancy Shirts
Of Broadcloth
New and
distinctive
0 atterna.
tfecsWor
VfiKWmWW collar
fv5T 1.49
"True-Blue"
Work Suits
Set on collar band, triple
stitched, eight pockets.
1.9S
The "Battery"
Helps Your Game
The leader of its class. Com
tortable, serviceable, and good
looking. White or brown duck
upper with black trim; imita
tion crepe outsole. An out
standing value, at
79c - 98c
"Pay-Day"
Opfcralls f of Boys
Union Made. Of
heavy 2.20 blue
denim. Cat full,
two seam legs,
high back.
1 to 10 Yean
1
98c TO
11 to 17 Yean
$1.10
Boys' Shirts
With Collar Attached
With one plain pocket Ik
ceptiooal values at
69c to 98c
Boys' Underwear
Of Nainsook
Athletic style, full cut and
sturdily made. Real vahje
49c
Two-Trousers
"Prep" Sofas 13-18 Yrs.
These Suits
measured up to
every test ox seir
ice and value. Cor
rectly styled h
every derail. Va
ried shades and
patterns.
$16.75
ft
.A Tan Elk shoe that win
give long service. Rubber sole
and heel Army hut I
$3.98
Beys' Tan Retan shoes with
leather sole aad heal.
2'2to5'2 $1.79
12'2 to 2 $1.69