Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, September 20, 1928, Page PAGE TWO, Image 2

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    PAGE TWO
HEPPNER GAZETTE TIMES, HEPPNER, OREGON, THURSDAY, SEPT. 20, 1928,
How Each State Voted From 1888 to 1924 , .
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Republican
E9 Third Pak.tx
1 Territory
Now Pick Your Winner In Each State
Here's a good game to play.
Just study the chart above. It
shows how the different states in
the union voted during the y-ivs
1888 and 1892.
Ten states show an unbroken
black line, indicating that since 1888
they have not once voted for any
other than the Democratic party.
These "states are Alabama, Arkan
sas, Florida. Georgia, Louisiana,
Mississippi, North Carolina, South
Carolina, Texas, and Virginia. These
states have a total electoral vote in
1928 of 114.
Tennessee voted other than a
Democratic ticket only once, in 1920.
Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois,
Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Michigan,
Minnesota, Oregon, Pennsylvania
and Rhode Island among other
states have been mostly Republican,
whlie Vermont has been solidly Re
publican since 1888.
Now mark in the spaces headed
"Your Estimate 1928" how you
think each state will go in 1928.
Then after the election compare the
actual results with your prophecies
and find out what sort of a political
prophet you are!
Fascinating game, isn't it?
at the close of the fair were left
with Mrs. Nick Faler.
Mrs. Rleks of Irrigon and Mrs.
Hereim of Boardman are retiring
members of the fair board. Two
new members will be selected for
next year. Other directors are Mrs.
W. C. Isom, Mrs. O. Coryell, W. O.
King, Mrs. Nick Faler and Lee
Mead, treasurer.
Mr. Nick Faler was the Board
man representative at the fair, go
ing up Friday and remaining over
night, a guest of Mrs. Reiks. Mrs.
Faler has been a faithful worker
for the interests of the fair for sev
eral years.
County Agent C. W. Smith also
deserves much commendation for
his labors in the interests of the
fair.
Grange will meet Saturday night
at which time a Harvest program
will be given. The meeting was
postponed a week because of the
fair.
Fred Hoskins of Rhea creek has
shipped in 300 head of sheep which
he is feeding on the Kunze place.
They are for sale.
Mr. and Mrs. Lundell of Willow
creek were Boardman visitors on
Friday.
Russell Mefford spent two days
visiting with his sister at Condon.
On Friday he and Eldon Wlison
will leave for Corvallis where they
will attend O. S. C. Alton Klitz will
also reenter O. S. C.
Mrs. Harvey Huff and small son
are home from Dufur.
I. Skobo and family were dinner
guests Sunday at the Kunze home.
Mr. Kunze was home from Condon
were he is employed.
LIVE LOCAL ITEMS.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Nutt, brother-in-law
and sister of Mrs. Stanley
Moore, are visiting this week at the
home of Rev. and Mrs. Stanley
Moore. Mr. and Mrs. Nutt are from
Paulsboro, N. J., and will remain at
Heppner for about ten days.
W. W. Brannon and son Marvin
were in town Wednesday from the
Eight Mile farm. Marvin will leave
BOARDMAN
The North Morrow County fair
was the leading event of the week
and Irrigon the Mecca for many
Boardman folks. Boardman and
Irrigon have held this fair jointly
ever since its inception and plans
were to have the two towns alter
nate each year but heretofore Irri
gon has not had a suitable place to
hold it until this year when the new
gymnasium was completed. The ex
hibits were shown in the basement
of the gym and although Boardman
did not "come up to scratch" this
year as was expected the Irrigonites
showed more than before so the
quantity on display was practically
the same. The matter of getting
the material to Irrigon seemed to
be the chief difficulty here and as
fair funds can be used only for pre
miums there was no money to pay
for hauling the displays up there,
hence many had no way of entering
their exhibits. Also a number were
haying or doing other work that
could not be deferred. The veget
able display was much smaller than
usual since Boardman raises more
vegetables than Irrigon.
There were three excellent gen
eral farm exhibits, all from Irrigon.
These were judged according to va
rieties, maturity and artistic ar
rangement with prizes of $6, $4 and
$3. They were well arranged and
showed productivity of the sandy
sou with water available. F. H.
Rieks won 1st prize and Mr. Light
2nd on these. Last year there were
no fruits shown, but Nature was
more kindly this year and melons
and fruits were present in abund
ance and lucious pears and peaches,
rosy apples, delectable strawberries
tempted both the eye and the palate.
Frank Frederickson was in charge
of this section. Adolf Skobo, who
won many prizes this year, was
awarded first on the best three wa
termelons. That Boardman receiv
ed the award rather than Irrigon
is explained by the fact that the
Irrigon section is from two to three
weeks earlier than Boardman and
the prime melons were gone. The
farm crops exhibit was not so large
as usual, only three or four entries
of corn being shown, and only two
sheafs of alfalfa. C. C. Gignoux
judged the farm crops (in charge of
Chas. Saling), the fruits, melons
and vegetables. C. H. Dillabough
was appointed superintendent of
the vegetables but was unable to
attend so Jess Badger acted as su
perintendent The usual gorgeous array of flow
ers was displayed, giant zinnias,
huge dahlias of various shades,
potted plants, asters, especially no
ticeable were some of the velvety,
odd shaped coxcombs, and some
"Princess Feather'another floral
oddity, the latter entered by Mrs.
B. B. Lewis of Boardman. Mrs.
Smith of Irrigon had charge of this
department and Mrs. Wooster of
Umatilla judged.
Mrs. Reiks and Mrs. Nick Faler
had charge of the Domestic Science
section and the many entries made
it one of the largest Miss Spike of
Boardman and one of the Irrigon
teachers whose name we did not
get judged this department Mrs.
Chas. Nizer had some clever novel
ties in the line of canned carrots
which showed much painstaking la
bor, while these were very attrac
tive with their fancy shapes and the
queer little vegetable maid in one
jar they were not awarded first
prize for few housewives would
have time to prepare vegetables in
that manner, but they did make an
attractive picture.
That baking is becoming a lost
art with the modern housewife was
again demonstrated even more this
year than last Only one cake was
entered and one loaf of bread, a few
cookies, doughnuts and pies. All
that were entered looked "good
enough to eat"
The bees and honey exhibit was
almost negligible which seems
strange in a section that produces
honey by the ton but it was always
difficult to create interest in that
division. Mr. Rodda of Hermiston
judged this and Hugh Grim was
superintendent
F. Markham took the place of
Vaj-non Jones as poultry superin
tendent as the latter went deer
hunting. Mr. Allen and Mr. Holt
county agent of Umatilla county,
judged the turkeys, rabbits and
poultry, club work included. Miss
Bannister of Heppner judged the
sewing, canning and cooking of the
club work.
The live stock department had a
greater number of entries this year
than probably ever before. O.
Coryell was superintendent and Mr.
Holt judged.
Geo. Jenkins, assistant county
agent, judged the garden club work
and L. J. Allen judged the sheep.
Miss Grieve of Irrigon and Miss
Spike of Boardman very graciously
gave of their time and judged the
Domestic Science and Domestic Art
division, a stupendous task because
of the many classes and entries.
Mrs. Bert Knight was superinten
dent of the Domestic Art with Mrs.
Haskell assisting.
Now that the fair is over, the
question arises, shall we continue
to have it or shall we abandon it?
This money is appropriated for fair
purposes and can be used only for
such. If any is left over it is re
turned to Heppner and goes into
the general fund. Will the interest
be any keener another year or will
it be the same faithful few who
bend their every effort to make it
a success, the same faithful few
who exhibit every year. It is a lot
of work to get an exhibit ready and
it means taking a lot of time, but it
is only once a year. Shall we do it
again or not? Let us hear from you.
Keep the date, Tuesday, Sept. 25
in mind. It is the night of the so
cial get-together meeting of the P.
T. A. and everyone is invited.
Word was received by Mrs. Royal
Rands of the death of Mrs. Mont
gomery at Hood River Wednesday,
September 12. She was the mother
of Mrs. Vaughnan Keyes.
Lyle Blayden and wife are guests
at the home of the former's parents,
Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Blayden. They
motored up from southern Califor
nia.
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Hendricks mo
tored to Portland In their fine new
Graham-Paige last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Claude Coates and
daughter Echo motored to Athena
on Saturday and Mr. and Mrs. Z. J.
Gillespie on Sunday to visit at the
Truman Messenger home.
Mrs. L. C. Cooney and two chil
dren came home from Aberdeen,
Wn., where they visited her two sis
ters and attended the marriage of
one, Miss Minnie Gorger.
Carl Wlcklander is home from a
week's sojourn at the hospital in
Heppner where he went on Sun
day, having suffered a throat in
fection a week after a tonsillectomy.
His throat was seared with electric
ity and this proving ineffective it
was later sewed to stop the hemor
rhages. He is recovering nicely and
was the only one of the ten operat
ed on to have any serious difficulty.
Sunday s Journal carried an ac
count of the Prael-Aldrich wedding
held Wednesday, Sept 15, at the
brides home in Portland. Mrs.
Prael will be remembered as Alice
Aldrich, the 3rd an d4th grade;
teacher in the Boardman school
some three or four years ago. She
was a great chum of Miss Barbara
Hixon, the prmiary teacher who is
now married. She assisted at the
reception given after the marriage.
Mr. and Mrs. Prael will make their
home in Astoria.
Andy Anderson of the Columbia
creamery in Portland was calling
on Boardman patrons and friends
Saturday.
Chas. Koski was a visitor at the
Hango and Olson homes last week,
coming up from his home at May
gar. The proceeds from the dinner giv
en on Friday and Saturday by the
ladies of Irrigon went to purchase
suits for the club band. The band
will go to the state fair next week
at Salem. Proceeds from the lunch
at the dance go into the fair fund
as a nucleus for next year. This
money is used to purchase pins,
lumber, ribbons, etc., as none of the
premium money can be used for
this.
A jar of fruit and a cup and sau
cer for which no owners were found
BETTER homes are built with better
lumber and that doesn't mean
high priced lumber either.
Our quality, our service, and our
prices will satisfy you.
Heppner Planing Mill & Lumber Yard
A. R. RE ID, Proprietor
Phones Mill 9F25, Yard Main 1123
DANCE DANCE
WEDNESDAY NIGHT, SEPT. 26. Bob Fletcher's Famous Round-Up Band
Also Every Night During Rodeo. Nuff Sed
24-HOUR SERVICE
The FERGUSON CHEVROLET CO is now
maintaining 24-hour service-
OVERNIGHT WASHING AND GREASING
Leave your car here in the evening and it will be
ready for you the next morning.
OFFICIAL A. A. A STATION
Towing Service Day or Night.
Ferguson Chevrolet Co.
R. B. FERGUSON and A. H. BERGSTROM
General Managers
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SHE'S WILD!
and our FALL HAT
offerings are the latesl:
Two of the Nation's Leaders:
Hardeman :: Stetson
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A & M A ft. I . mm m ft M W ftv t I
Hardemans $5 and $7
Stetson's Select Quality $8.50
Stetson's Excellent Quality $10
Complete line of
Cowboy Hats
in both makes
EVERYTHING FOR THE MAN AT
la M
at once for Monmouth where he
enters the State Normal for the
winter, beginning his preparation
for the teaching profession. He
was a graduate last spring from
Heppner high school.
Mrs. Lena Snell Shurte, fcrmeily
superintendent of schools of Mor
row county, is visiting with friends
in Heppner this week from her
home In Portland.
Mr. and Mrs. D. S. Barlow were
Rhea creek people in the city on
Wednesday. Mr. Barlow engages
quite extensively In the dairy busi
ness these days, and finds it is a
paying proposition for a creek
rancher.
Henry Krebs, of Krebs Bros., Ce
cil sheepmen, was a visitor in this
city Tuesday for a few. hours, while
looking after business Interests.
B. H. Turner, lone wheatraiser,
was a visitor In Heppner on Wed
nesday. Seeding is not under way
in his locality yet.
Make this
RODEO
Headquarters
You'll want to reflect
the Rodeo Spirit in
your dress.
WE HAVE
Cowboy Hats
Bandanas
Brightly Hued
Shirts
Everything in wearing
apparel for all the family
Thomson Bros.
Dry Goods - Shoes - Groceries
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Come on folks!
- Let's go to the
RODEO
Big Time for
Everyone!
Fir& National Bank
HEPPNER, OREGON
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