Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, December 15, 1927, Page PAGE THREE, Image 3

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HEPPNER GAZETTE TIMES, HEPPNER, OREGON, THURSDAY, DEC. 15, 1927.
PAGE THREE
BOARDMAN
Mr. Royal Rand and Mrs. Brice
Dlllabough entertained at the La
dies Aid silver tea on Wednesday of
last week at the home of the former.
Christmas plans were discussed and
the topic of "What Christmas Means
to the World" was mentioned and
several Christmas poems read. The
missionary sewinjr for the hospital in
Alaska must be done shortly. Mrs.
Root's committee will entertain at
the January tea. It was decided not
to hold the second meeting this month
since it comes so close to Christmas.
Mesdames Rands and Dillabough
served a lovely lunch.
W. H. Mefford and family left on
Thursday for Palouse, Wash., to visit
at the Max DeWeese home.
Mrs. Homer Cason and Wm. Har
rington returned Sunday from Port
land where they went to attend the
funeral service of the son and bro
ther, Charles Harrington who died
very suddenly last Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Spring spent
several days in Portland last week.
Boardman was visited by the first
snowstorm on Friday, December 9.
This was followed by a cold snap that
brought out extra comforts, over
shoes, mittens and similar accessor
ies. Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Spring and Mr.
and Mrs. Hick Faler .extended their
hospitality on Wednesday evening to
a congenial group of friends. Cards
were the evening's diversion and at
the close of the game it was found
that Mr. and Mrs. L. G. Smith scored
high. Consolation went to Mrs. Ran
sier and Royal Rands. Lovely re
freshments were served. Guests
were Messrs. and Mesdames Rangier,
Houghton of Umatilla, Rands, L. G.
Smith, Gorham, Mrs. Marguerite
Johnson of Portland and R. Waamer.
Elmer Westerfelt has n baling crew
at Butter creek. Going from Board
man were Leslie Packard, Homer Ca
son, Chas, Nickerson and nephew,
Milton Brown.
Boardman friends were pleased to
hear of the arrival of Chas. Henry
Messenger December 2 at Portland.
He is a lusty young chap and weighed
9 pounds. His father, Uram Mes
senger, is a graduate of Boardman
high school and of 0. A. C.
Ona Imus. had one of her tonsils
removed Saturday by Dr. Rorfe of
Hermiston. She will have the other
taken out in about two weeks.
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Mead entertained
at a lovely dinner Monday nigh)., De
cember 6, having Mr. and Mrs. Ralph
Davis and sons and Carl Doring as
guests.
Mr, Wicklandcr and Mr. Nizer went
to Hermiston last week where Mr.
Wicklander had the Bplints removed
from his arm which he broke some
time ago while cranking a Ford.
Ruth Eleanor King's sixth birth
day was celebrated on Tuesday of
last week when her mother arranged
a delightful party for several of her
little friends. Many interesting games
were played. The table was very at
tractive with bands of orange crepe
paper, cunning prune nad raisin alli
gators, a dainty Japanese place card
with a prune turtle and a huge pop
corn ball for each child as well as
punch, pudding, cookies and the birth
day cake. The guests were Elisnbeth
Kristensen, Catherine Mead, Helen
Gross, Harry Humphrey, Mardell Gor
ham, Allen Dillabough, Orthun Her
eim, Stnnton Hadley, Stanley and
Bobby King and the hostess. Moth
ers present were Mesdames Gross,
Humphrey, Hereim, Mead, Gorham,
and Hadley.
A tonsillectomy clinic was held in
Boardman on Friday with nine chil
dren undergoing the operation. Dr.
McMurdo of Heppner operated. He
brought two nurses with him. The
children all came through the opera
tion in fine shape. The school house
was turned into a temporary hospital
witTi the kitchen for the surgery and
the sewing room for the ward. As is
customary i Boardman in time of
need everyone who could assisted in
every way in nursing, in getting the
necessary equipment ready, prepar
ing delicacies for the youngsters, in
transporting them to their homes.
We know of no community that is
more united, more kindly, more help
ful than ours at a time like this. Pa
tients were Ruth and Stanley King,
Pete Farley, Betty and Nicholas Mul
lcr, Ralph and Edward Skobo, Roscoe
Broyles and Roy Partlow. Last year
physical examination of the school
aiiildren showed 40 cases of bad ton
sils. Some of them were taken care
of during the summer but many yet
are handicapped by diseased or en
larged tonsils. This clinic gave peo
ple an opportunity to have this done
at a special rate. It is hoped that
another clinic may be held later.
Mrs. J. H. Imus and her daughter
Mrs. Geo. Gross, celebrated their
birthdays togethre on Sunday with a
fine birthday dinner at the Gross
home. Mrs. Imus' birthday is the 12th
and Mrs. Gross' the 11th.
Dale Cox spent the week end in Ru
fus with his parents.
Mr. and Mrs. Guy Barlow and Mrs.
Z. J. Gillespie motored to The Dalles
Saturday to do some Christmas shop
ping. Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Gross motored
to Hermiston Monday. Mrs. Gross,
who has been under the weather for
some time, consuled a physician.
Mrs. Eck Warren went to Hermis
ton Friday where she has been taking
treatments. Mrs. Warren fell last
summer and injured her spine.
"Teddy" Hango passed away Mon
day, December 12, from pneumonia.
He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas.
Hango. Charles Theodore was born
August 10th at Brockett, N. D., and
was eleven years old at the time of
his death. He came to Boardman
when but a baby and has spent prac
tically all his life here. Teddy suf
fered from the same affliction as two
of hia brothers a sort of creeping
paralysis which grew worse as the
years passed. One brother Arvfe
died about five years ago and the
other brother, Wayne, passed away
last August. The three brothers are
all laid to rest in the Boardman
cemetery. Although Teddy had not
walked for several years he was al
ways cheerful and glad to Bee com
pany and liked to visit with folks.
Funeral services were held Wednes
day afternoon at 2:00 p. m. from the
church. Boardman friends extend
their deepest sympathy to the be
reaved family.
Earl Cramer was called to Hepp
ner for jury duty. He went over
Sunday.
Grahge met Saturday night and a
fair sized crowd attended in spite of
the bitter cold. Mr. and Mr. F. A.
Fortier and Mr. and Mrs, J. H. Imus
were initiated into the order. A hot
dinner 'was served at 7:00 p. m. Af
ter initiation election of officers was
held. Chas. Wicklander was elected
Master in Bpite of his protest. Other
officers elected were Mr. Niier, Over
seer; Mrs. Ed Kunzie, Lecturer; Mrs.
Nizer, Chaplain; C. H. Dillabough,
Secretary; Bob Mitchell, Steward;
Mrs. Brice Dillabough, Lady Assist
ant Steward; Paul Smith, Assistant
Steward; Glen Hadley, Gatekeeper;
the three Graces, Ceres, Pomona and
Flora were Mesdames Hadley, Chaf
fee and Mitchell.
Ivy Olson returned home Sunday
night from a pleasant visit with
Blanche and Esther Imus at Pull
Wash. Jack Gorham, John Brice, Alfred
Skobo and E. Peck motored to Hepp
ner Monday. Alfred was to get his
first citizenship papers. Mr. Gorham
and Mr. Brice were his witnesses.
The American Legion met Thurs
day night. Routine business was
transacted.
The date of the annual Sunday
school Christmas program has not
been definitely settled. Announce
ment will be made next week. The
program is in charge of Mrs. E. T.
Messenger, Miss Beougher and some
of the girls will make candy to be
sold on Saturday of this week, pro
ceeds to be used for the Christmas
treat.
Brice Dillabough is "having a well
drilled on his ranch west of town. A
driller from Bickloton is doing the
work.
T. W. Cutsforth of Lexington was
a recent visitor at the F. F. Klitz
home.
Mrs. W. A. Price and son Billie
SPECIAL AT
Buhn's
FOR THIS WEEK
Men's
STRAP
Watches
Reg. $12.50
For $g.75
i Before Selling Your Wheat
SEE
I F. W. Turner
Representing BALFOUR-
GUTHEKIE CO,
At Heppner, Phon. SS2
went to Portland on Thursday for
several days visit.
A few ladies gathered at the John
Brice home last Thursday to tie a
quilt which is to be sold by thj Home
Economics club. '
Mr, and Mrs. Bobby Smith shopped
in Portland Friday and Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Porter left Tues
day for Portland till after the holi
days. IONE MARSHAL ARRESTS ROBBER
A man registered at the Jone hotel
under the name of Arlington, was ar
rested by City Marshal Frank after
a chase down the creek, states the
lone Independent. Arlington was fol
lowed by the men from whom he1 had
stolen a valuable watch and some
other items of personal property.
They located him at the hotel and
when he refused to come out of his
room, Bwore out a warrant for his
arrest. While this was being done,
Arlington climbed out of a window
and attempted to escape down the
creek. The marshal gave chase and
after searching the brush along the
creek and finding the fugitive's hand
luggage where it had been hidden in
the bushes, captured him in the open
field and brought him back to lone.
He confessed the theft of the articles
and was brought to Heppner and
lodged in jail. He promised to se
cure the watch from the person to
whom he had sold it and return it to
the owner.
The ladies of the Methodist church
will hold their annual Chistmas Ba
zaar on Saturday, December 10, in
the parlors of the church, beginning
at 2 o'clock p. m. Come and buy
your Christmas gifts, 34-tf.
LOST Eastern Star club napkins.
Will finder pleaBe leave at Gordon's.
UlllllllllltlllltIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIl
Ask Your Grocer for the
I Oregon Bakery's I
NEW SUPERIOR LOAF
1 "Butternut" or "Round-Up" f
Our home-made pastries are de-
livered in Heppner fresh daily
niiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiililiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiif?
ONLY 12 DAYS
more to take advantage of our unusually low prices for the finest Xmas
Goods we have ever been able to offer.
is to buy.
Don't fail to come in to look
XMAS CANDY Box and Bulk
Box Candy, Xmas wrapped,
75c to $6.50
Societe Satin Finish hard candy,
22 lbs., $1.00
STATIONERY 85c to $3.50.
LADIES' HAND BAGS Genu
ine leather in latest styles just
received this week priced from
$3.50 to $6.50
TOILET SETS in latest shades
and styles direct from New York
priced $8.50 to $27.50
I
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ROLL MANICURE SETS In
genuine leather rolls, silk lined.
Priced $1.25 to $8.50
A complete line of Xmas Crds,
Seals, Twine, Wrapping ' Paper.
SAVE WITH SAFETY AT YOUR REXALL STORE
PATTERSON & SON
WHAT DO YOU NEED?
We have In stock all the building materials named here:
IRON ROOFING, ASBESTOS ROOFING AND SHINGLES; BEST
GRADE CEDAR SHINGLES; WALL BOARD, PLASTER BOARD,
BUILDING PAPER; LIME, PLASTER, , CEMENT; BUILDERS'
HARDWARE; SCREENS AND CEL-O-GLASS; BUILT-IN FIX
TURES; DOORS AND WINDOWS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION;
or anything you need In our line, at the right price.
Heppner, Planing Mill & Lumber Yard
A. R. REID, Proprietor
Phones-Mill 9F25, Yard Main 1123
GOING
FAST
SOME LINES ALREADY DEPLETED
Keep out winter's
chill with one of
these heavy
COATS
All Coats Fur Lined
$15.00 Coats $11.29
$10.75 Coats $8.71
$12.50 Coats $10.71
$18.00 Coats $13.98
$12.75 Coats $10.89
$4.75 Leather Vests $1.98
As prices throughout Entire
Stock of Dry Goods, Men's &
Ladies' Clothing, Groceries of
W. IP. LPropDneD:
are cut to rock-bottom in a
TREMENDOUS store-wide
A Wonderful Buy in
SHOES
One Lot Children's, a big
value at 48c
One Lot Children's, all
leather sturdy shoes, $1.49
Incomplete lines, but they
will go fast.
All Men's Work Shoes
Greatly Reduced!
Fn
Sale
MOO.
We must have cash, and to get it we are disregarding profit. Each article is of guaranteed quality and will sell as long
as it lasts at the price quoted. We need the money and this alone is our reason for liquidating our stock at once at
real money-saving prices. FORGET THE HIGH COST OF LIVING. BUY HERE!
Large Stocks Await Your Early Selection
Men s Clothing
$4.35 Corduroy Pants .... $3.49
$4.00 Moleskin Pants $3.19
$3.25 Khaki Blanket Lined
Pants $2.49
$5.00 Union Suits (all wool) $4.29
$4.25, Overshoes ........ $3.91
65c Men's Woolen Sox . . 49c
65c Men's Silk Sox ..49c
$4.50 Men's Hats $3.59
$2.25 Winter Caps' $1.89
300 Pair $1.95 OVERALLS $1.79
90c Shirts 79c
$4.95 Fancy Sweaters ..... $3.89
$9.00 Blazers $6.98
Groceries
$2.25 Olympia Flour $2.15
90c 9-lb. Pancake Flour 80c
75c Farina 70c
70c Rolled Oats 65c
$1.50 Tea Garden Syrup $1.35
95c Liberty Bell Syrup 85c
$1.00 4-lb. Lard 90c
$1.95 8-lb. Lard $1.80
All 25c Canned Goods 22c
20c Canned Goods 17c
$1.95 Gallon Sweet Pickles $1.75
$1.30 Gallon Dill Pickles 98c
$2.00 Gallon Catsup $1.78
80c Gallon Peaches 73c
85c Gallon Gooseberries 71c
90c Gallon Loganberries 78c
50c Great American Coffee 40c
Candies, Cookies, Nuts, Vegetables,
Fruits, Honey, Cereals, Sugar, Salt.
Ladies Clothing
$1.00 Hosiery 89c
60c Hosiery 49c
$1.95 Hosiery $1.69
65c Bloomers 50c
Fancy Silk Bloomers at $ 1 .75, $1 .00
Underwear, Garters, Dresses, Dress
Goods, Gloves, Handkerchiefs, Ban
deaux, all at 10 Discount.
Dry Goods Specials
$7.00 Blankets at $5.98
$7.50 Blankets at $6.50
$8.75 Blankets at $7.98
$3.25 Comforts at $2.89
$25.00 Overcoats at $16.50
w.
p.
Prophet
PERFUME SETS, manufactur- 4
ed by the leading perfumers of
America and France priced at
$1.25 to $12.50
Beautiful assortment Perfumers
and Atomizers at $1.25 to $6.50
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