The gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1912-1925, December 14, 1922, Page PAGE FOUR, Image 4

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    THE GAZETTE-TIMES, HEITNER. OREGON. THURSDAY. DECEMBER 14. 1922.
page rnrn
L. MONTERESTELLI
Marble and Granite
Works
PENDLETON, OREGON
Fine Monument and Cemetery Work
All parties interested in getting work in my line
should get my prices and estimates before
placing their orders
All Work Guaranteed
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I A. M. EDWARDS I
WELL DRILLER, Box 14, Lexington, Ore.
1 Up-to-date traction drilling outfit, equipped for all sizes of hole 5
2 and depths. Write for contract and terms. Can furnish you
1 CHALLENGE SELF-OILING WINDMILL 1
5 all steel. Light Running, Simple, Strong, Durable. 5
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Pioneer Employment Co.
With Two Big Offices
PENDLETON AND PORTLAND
Is prepared to handle the business of
Eastern Oregon better than ever before
Our Specialties
Farms, Mills, Camps, Hotels, Garages, Etc.
WIRE RUSH ORDERS AT Ol'R EXPENSE
PrtUa OMe
14 n. Uent it
PeaeUetaa OBf
111 . W. It.
Only Employment Office in Eastern Oregon with Connections in Portland
The Byers Chop
(Formerly SCHEMPP-S MILL)
STEAM ROLLED BARLEY AND WHEAT
We handle Gasoline, Coal Oil and
Lubricating Oil
You Find Prompt and Satisfactory Service Here
LOOKING AHEAD
NATION'S industrial situa
tion shows itself, as a rule,
in the statements issued by
the banks of the country.
Thus, periods of prosperity are marked
by increases in commercial as well as sav
ings deposits. Periods of readjustment,
with their accompanying problems of un
employment, show themselves in a de
cline of commercial deposits and a slight
change of savings deposits. And as
times become better and the future looms
big with possibilities, bank deposits grow
again and business comes to life.
As we look ahead the best advice that
this bank can give is: "GET YOUR
FINANCES WELL IN HAND.
BUILD UP YOUR CHECKING AC
COUNT. PREPARE YOURSELF TO
MEET OPPORTUNITY WITH A
CASH RESERVE AND CREDIT POS
SIBILITIES." FARMERS & STOCKGROWERS
NATIONAL BANK
Heppner
Oregon
Tiser of France is With Us
Li V jfTO
. . ., ;. i
V.
,
Georges Clemenceau, The Tiger of France ind the great War
Premier, is now on a triumphant tour of the United- States, carrying1
? message of national friendship. J The grizzled old warrior is now
1 yeari old. Abort hit first look up at the famous Woolworth
Towar in New York. Below hit rtceptioa at CSty Hall Park, N. Y.
This is Education Week, proclaimed
so by the President and so recognized
by various states and institutions.
Oregon, no less interested in educa
tion than her neighbors, is employing
it as an occasion for review of her
educational progress, and as an op
oprtunity to visualize a more com
plete system of education for the
future. It is easy to recall much
of commendable advancement during
recent years, and equally easy to
recognize the need for further de
velopment. Education is dynamic and
must keep pace with industrial and
social progress. In order to plan
wisely for the continued growth of
the educational, system of the state,
it is necessary that present condi
tions be thoroughly understood.
It is the desire of those interested
in education in Oregon to plan for
the improvement of the educational
system from kindergarten to the uni
versity. Naturally, in viewing the en
tire system, the thought is inclined
to linger upon its foundation, the
elementary school. In order to plan
effectively for the improvement of the
public school system, it becomes im
mediately apparent that two features
enter prominently into the develop
ment of the schools. These are the
material factor on the one hand, in
cluding adequate equipment in build
ings, school furniture, course of study
and text books; and the vita! factor
on the other hand, consisting in pro
perly trained and cultured teachers.
There can be no efficient school sys
tem, no matter what the organization,
without properly trained teachers.
At the present time, the state of Ore
gon requires a limited amount of
professional training for all teachers
entering the profession. This is one
of the features of Oregon's superior
ity educationally. The institution
provided by the state 'or the train
in of teachers for the elementary
schools, the Normal School at Mon
mouth, is limited in its capacity. The
demand for trained teachers is now
outrunning the ability of the Nor
mal School to prepare them, and the
demand for students desiring to pre
pare for teaching has become great
er than the Normal School can meet.
More students are applying at the
Oregon Normal School for admission
iArmour at Capital
Talking of Merge
r;
Sl til Jl!
and training than can be properly
accomodated with its present equip
ment. This year, the increase in en
rollment is more than fifty per cent
above that of the corresponding date
in 1921. Last year, the total attend
ance was more than fifty per cent
grater than for the preceding year.
Thus, within two years, the attend
has more than doubled. Everything
points to a continuation of this in
crease. Notwithstanding the crowd
ed conditions, practically the sane
faculty, with only one additional
member, aside from critic teacherj,
is endeavoring to carry on the in
creased work. A number of classes
register more than one hundred stu
dents. At least two-thirds of the
classes in the Normal School are
much larger than hey should be,
and entirely too large to do the
work required of them. It will be
impossible to meet the requirements
of efficient training of teachers with
out increased facilities. Moreover,
'he standing of the Normal School
Sky The Limit For This Memorial
i .r
i v -
k
or ou ' :-. p.
CF kEKTUOMi I
jWGUCAN dead .
I 3 II
In .the rotunda of the Mammoth Lave, ky, is this memorial, which
tan reach to the sky and still will be uncompleted. Visitors- to the
ave will bring stones from every State in the union to lay on it
among other similar institutions, as
well as its standardisation with the
V. S. Department of Education, it
jeopardized. There is immediate
need along three particular lines, not
to speak of plans for future growth.
These imperative needs are addition
al members of faculty, a new train
ing school at Independence, and in
creased living facilities for students.
Additional class rooms will be a re
quirement of the near future.
Oregon is at the present time in
advertently neglecting her Normal
School and allowing herself to fall
far behind other states in her facil
ities for training her teachers. By
way of comparison, states not as
large or as populous, nor as wealthy
are providing considerably more for
normal school support than is Ore
gon. Idaho, with a population of only
a little more than half that of Ore
gon, and an assessed valuation of
less than half, provides one and one
third times as much for its normal
schools. Arizona Bnd New Mexico,
with less than half the population
and two-thirds the assessed valua
tion, furnish three times as much
each for normal schools as does Or
egon. Other states are making cor
responding provision for the train
ing of teachers for their elementary
schools. Colorado, with a population
a little larger and an assessed valua
tion one and one-half more, appro
priates four times as much for its
normal schools. Washington, with
less than twice the population and
about twice the assessed valuation,
&de Jctay tfcsk
f LIM ICWK' OMrtKTRl WHO WT TO!
I cm Swtry.hooc has coas
BACK A SWS SH& A MAwdRISr!
lUM DeaiKIT- H6 SANS SHB
CANT PtM ON THE
It CUM AT, ALL
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gives approximate!- six times as
much for normal schools. Califor
nia, with four times the population
and three times the assessed valua
tion, grants over eleven times as
much for Its normUs.
It is believed that when the people
of Oregon know the imperative need
of their one institution established
in the interest of the boys and girls
in the primary and grammar schools
of the state, they will not withhold
the meagre sum necessary for the
adequate support of that institution.
Railroad Men Visit Vnirersity.
University of Oregon, Eugene, Dec.
12 Twelve railroad men, including
those most directly responsible for
the success of the 11,000,003 advertis
ing campaign launched by the Burl
ington Route, the Great Northern
and the Northern Pacific, visited the
University of Oregon campus recently.
The visitors spent an hour at the
University, going first to administra
tion offices in Johnson Hall, and later
to the Woman's building. Here they
admired the Murray Warner collec
tion of Oriental art pieces.
The entire building was inspected,
the party remaining for a time in
Alumni Hall. Afterwards they toured
the campus, and the Northern Paci
fic railway men in particular express
ed interest in Villard Hall. The
IvM A. MATTHEWS
iffU
DlD. LL.D.
Tells President of
Klan's Activities
This picture of Gov. Jonn Parker
of Louisiana was taken as he left
the White House after telling Pre.
ident Harding of the Ku Klux
KUn's amazing growth in his state
and intentions to control through
political power,
DISHONEST PREACHERS
It is rather a strange subject for
me to discuss, and yet it is a subject
which is very timely.
Ministers will wince, some will
get angry, some unsophisticated
preachers will deny that there are
dishonest preachers, and the dishon
est preachers will pretend to be ex
ceedingly pious, and will hurl their
pious bricks at anyone who makes
the suggestion.
The fact remains that there are
dishonest preachers. We are not re
ferring to men who fail to pay their
debts, altho there are many preachers
who do not understand that an en
gagement must be kept on the day
the note falls due.
We are talking about the blasphe
mous, premeditated ly dishonest
preachers who remain in orthodox
pulpits and draw their salaries from
orthodox members of the church while
they preach rationalism, socialism,
heresy and anarchy every Sunday.
Any rationalistic preacher who
stands in the pulpit and denies the
fundamental doctrines of God's in
fallible Word and continues to draw
his salary from the treasury of ortho
dox churches is dishonest. He is
mentally dishonest, morally dishonest
and financially dishonest. He is gett
ing money under false pretenses, is,
living before the public a lie, and is
practicing a fraud upon the congre
gation. He is drawing his meat and bread
from the pockets of honest, orthodox
men and women.
Why isn't he honest enough to re
sign the pulpit? Why doesn't he go
to his own crowd and ask them to give
him a crust of bread and clothe his
unworthy body. No, he defames God,
and demands of God's people that they
support him. If that isn't dishonest,
then I do not know the meaning of the
word.
The time has come when every
church in this land composed of hon
est, consecrated, orthodox Christian
men and women should rise and drive
from their pulpits such dishonest
men.
Send them to the fields to eat
grass.
Kick them out of your pulpits;
cease to feed and to employ men who
deny the infallibility of God's Word,
who deny the Deity of Christ, and
reject His vicarious atonement.
Drive from the pulpit these dishon
est, time-serving, salary-grabbing opportunists.
Mother Arrives in ConeresSe
7 mti
fete .ez. g?virV JSEk
Mrs. Winifred M. Huck, of Illinois, mother of three, it the first
mother elected to Congress. A shown here on the right, she receiv.
ing flowers from Congresswoman Alice Robertson of Oklahoma, wht
failed for re-election to. the House.
HOME
SWEET
HOME
Oscar's Hiatb
Time Brings
Nine More
Visum
Terry
Cilkison
iiT.cimi
AO I WTVtV SUGGEST AWTMN6
OF THE SOOT TO AUNT HATTlGi
WWV DON'T VOO SPEAK TO I
t
MEf? A H'AI r
TO 60 MOI
I HAVE
I 6ee 6osh( she!; V
l HERE FIVE cHE'' L
IV J - 1 1-7 . ..
j A .miii is tliAwn here
u Im left the Department of Agri
culture in , Washington after con
ferring with Government official
regardinj big merge of Meat
Packing House.. The Farm Bloc
will oppose h.
OtSrE BEEN A LO6 T7rA vTAl' US
AUriT HATTIE OOI'T V0U THNK. UNCLE
iM AH' VOUt PET? will BE 6ETTW
''V, LONESOME TO SEE vou
T ( THANKS OSCAR'. TWATi? A 6000 )
I SufieesrtON. i'li 60 an' tele6RApm
' I I JIM TO COME FEB. A VISIT AN'
fj BRING POLLY AN TABBY' V X ' f.
rtve 10U SENT
us A'Howa
MA BIT" ?
It NOT WHY
0T IE milll
PRINT IT FOR
VDU- HERES
ONE fWM
1. 1 . NSM
" BROTHER,
A AlvuAS .
ACOOWrAULl
weAHiMi Ml
new )i lic
shirts '
building was named in honor of Hen
ry Villard, the builder of the North
ern l'acine railroad, and was con
structed as a result of a Jf.0.000
gift made to the University in 1885.
Included in the party was Harlan
Smith, special representative of the
roads and a well-known writer. The
roads plan to tell in the great nation
al magazines the story of the North
west, its history; its development;
its economic position and its econo
mic possibilities.
College Avnihire Cows Make Good
Milk Record
Oregon Panetta J. No. 69203, Ayr
shire junior two year old heifer of
the college herd, has finished a re
cord of 13,691 pounds of milk and
621.3 pounds of butter fat. Final
approval of this record has not been
received but it is approximately what
will be allowed. This places her
among the highest heifrs of that age.
She ranks eighth in amount of milk
produced and fifth in amount of but
ter fat produced.
This is the highest record daughter
of Oregon Peter Pan, the seuior herd
sire at the college. Another of his
daughters, Oregon Panetta K, has
just finished with about the same a
mount of milk and between BOO and
600 pounds of butter fat.
ijllMlLiW!!!!!!1!!':;!'!!
Big Cut In
Overland Cars
WILLYS-KNIGHT
$1455
OVERLAND
$666
We have taken the Morrow County Ag
ency for the OVERLAND and WILLYS
KNIGHT cars. Let us give you a demon
stration. RAY M. OVIATT - DICK JOHNS
At Universal Garage
Heppner, Oregon
iflWIIIIIIIIil llillllMl ailillililll'IMl
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I ARLINGTON-HEPPNER STAGE LINE 1
I WE MEET TRAINS NOS. I, 2 AND 18 I
I NEW SCHEDULE EFFECTIVE DECEMBER 1st
TO HEPPNER
A.M. P.M.
Arlington ....Lv 9:00 2:00
Cecil Lv 10:20 3:20
Morgan Lv 10:35 3:35
lone Lv 11:05 4:05
Lexington ..Lv 11:30 4:30
Heppner Ar 11:55 4:55
TO ARLINGTON
A.M. P.M.
Heppner ... Lv 9:00 4:00
Lexington ..Lv 9:25 4:25
lone Lv 9:50 4:50
Morgan Lv 10:05 5:05
Cecil Lv 10:35 5:35
Arlington ....Ar 11:55 6:55
HEADQUARTERS AT PATRICK HOTEL
I 0. H. McPherrin R.E.Burke f
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KIRK BUS & TRANSFER COMPANY
WM. M. KIRK, Proprietor
Prompt and efficient service at all times, both
day or night. Leave orders at Hotel Patrick
or Phone Main 664.
BAGGAGE : EXPRESS : FREIGHT
COUNTRY TRIPS -:- GENERAL HAULING
Jimltnland
WHERE the sun shines most of
11 the time. Out-of-door life all
the time.
Thousands of miles of paved high
ways through picturesque semi
tropic settings make motoring won
derfully exhilarating.
Most attractive ocean beaches on
the Pacific Coast.
Most complete system of hotels,
apartment houses, cottages, bunga-
1 1 11 --!.- r , . f
tows anu sinau suites ior tourists ot
' any country in the world, and all
costs reasonable. Room for everybody.
Representatives of the
UNION PACIFIC SYSTEM
will iladlr furnlih Imtrurttre and beautifully llluirratnl booklets
(ivirjr complete Mormibon about the ilorlom playground of
the Wett. Let then tell H about hotel rates, railroad fnrea,
throuih car aerrke, the (anous Circle Tour throuih San Fran
ctaco and Salt Lake City, era part of Uw way b)r ocean trip. No
lourney of equal Inter cat In America.
C. DARBEE, Agent, Heppner, Ore.
WM. McMURRAY, General Passenger
Agent, Portland, Oregon