Heppner herald. (Heppner, Or.) 1914-1924, June 12, 1923, Page PAGE TWO, Image 2

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    PAGE TWO
THE HEPPNER HERALD., HEPPNER, OREGON
Tuesday, June 12, 1923
THE HEPPNER HERALD
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
S. A. PATTISON, Editor and Publisher
Entered at the Heppner, Oregon,
THE PRIZE-WINNING EDITORIAL
j?l
Some of the most enduring pieces of literature have not
J)ccn notable for length, says Literary Digest. Lincoln's
reat Gettysburg speech might be called .a memorandum;
his letter to Mrs. Bixby a note. The editorial that gained
the Pulitzer prize did not fill a column. It appeared in the
Kmporia Gazette of July 27, 1922, at the time of the rail
road strike, and was inspired by the controversy between
its editor, William Allen White, and his friend Governor
Henry J. Allen. It follows:
"TO AN ANXIOUS FRIEND
"You tell me that law is above freedom of utterance,
and I reply that you can have no wise laws nor free en
forcement of wise laws unless there is free expression of
the wisdom of the people and, alas, their folly with it.
But, if there is freedom, folly will die of its own poison,
and the wisdom will survive. That is the history of the
race. It is the proof of man's kinship with God.
"You say that freedom of utterance is not for time of
stress, and I reply with the sad truth that only in time of
stress is freedom of utterance in danger. No one questoins
it in calm days, because it is not needed. And the reverse
is true also; only when free utterance is suppressed is it
needed, and when it is needed it is most vital to justice.
Peace is good. Hut if you are interested in peace through
force and without free discussion that is to say, free ut
terance decently and in order your interest in justice is
slight. And peace without justice is tyranny, no matter
how you may sugar-coat it with expediency. This state
today is in more danger from suppression than from vio
lence, because i n the end suppression leads to violence;
indeed, is the child of suppression. Whoever pleads for
justice helps to keep the peace, and whoever tramples up
on the plea of justice, temperately made in the name of
peace, only outrages peace and kills something fine in the
heart of man which God put there when He got. out man
hood. When that is killed, brute meets brute on each side
of the line.
"vSo, dear friend, put fear out of your heart. This nation
will survive, this stale will prosper, the orderly business of
life wil go forward if only men can speak in whatever way
given them to utter what their hearts hold by voice, by
posted card, by letter or by press. Reason never has failed
men. Only force and repression have made the wrecks
in the world."
BRYAN'S GREATEST TASK
If Mr. Bryan were to be asked to name the eight great
reforms with which he proudly boasts he has been "en
gaged in the past twenty-five years," he would doubtless
find no difficulty; but offhand the casual commentator
would be at a loss to know what they are. To be sure, there
is prohibition, which the Commoner now claims as his very
own, and woman suffrage; but no democratic platform in
which Mr. Bryan ran for president ( 1896-1000-1908), had
:iny reference to these great subjects; and the democratic
convention, of 1920 was frightened into a near-panic when
Mr. Bryan, who had never before seriously troubled his
party (.except in Nebraska), on the subject, demanded
that it declare for strict enforcement of the dry law.
Mr. Bryan will probably be on hand in 1924 to commit
the party and its candidate to prohibition; yet he will line
up at the polls for the regular nominee in the ensuing elec
tion, whether he be wet or dry, or just medium; Mr. Bryan
is a democrat before he is a prohibitionist, b'ree silver was
Ihe battle cry of the democracy in i8i)(, and anti imperial
ism in 1000 and anti-monopoly (as much as anything) in
K8. The gold .standard is today the accepted basis of
national and world finance, the Philippines are under the
1'nitcd States flag, and Wall street still lives chastened
and discreet . bil si ill act i e.
( hice there was a political creed in this country describ
ed as "Hryanisiu." It was in essence rebellion against the
lixed principles of economic law. and had no relation either
to morals or religion. Now Mr. Bryan has turned his at
tention to the church and would restore the old theology.
He has a longer record behind him there than he had in
politics; but he has undertaken a formidable task. Is there
to be a "Hryanisiu" in evolution? Orcgonian.
LEARNING BY
On his way to buy a pair of shoes a farmer stopped to
sell a large calfskin in prime condition. The dealer did
not want to buy it at all but at last gave him 45 cents for it.
Exit calfskin; enter shoes for which the farmer had to
pay $8.40, reduced in price from $10.00 a pair. Nothing
fancy, simply honestly made of real calfskin. The farmer
objected to the price. The salesman assured him that the
shoes were worth the money, since one calfskin did not
make 11101 e than four pairs of the very best shoes, or from
si to nine pahs of inferior shoes.
As a producer of raw materials the farmer got 45c for a
caltskin, tor which the consumer must pav an average of
made up m shoes !
This I a 1 1 1 U" now states that his education in economics
is complete, 1ih011t rccchin a degree from the iinivcrsi
t. Inc:der;ai!y, he has become a confirmed co-operator,
content with nothing less than the co-operatie produc
tions! the nccessiiii-s ol life and co-operative distribution
without profit or exploitation to the consumers.
IT PAYS TO READ
Postotflce as second-class Matter
EXPERIENCE
THE HERALD ADS
COUNTY COURT HOLDS
U
County court met in regular ses
sion on Wednesday, June 6, 1923,
with all officers present, when were
had the following proceedings:
The court authorized the sheriff
to issue to individuals requesting
same certificates of delinquency on
taxes delinquent since 1918.
Resignation of M. R-. Morgan as
district road supervisor accepted by
the court.
Road petitions of T. J. Jones an.l
J. R. Ashinhurst continued.
Court set aside $1500 to be used
in co-operation with the state live
stock sanitary board and federal bio
logical survey as outlined by chapter
296 of the 1923 Oregon session laws,
thus eliminating the direct payment
of bounties on predatory animals.
The road petition of O. T. Fergu
son read and T. J. Jones appointed
as viewer to act with regular view
ers in viewing said proposed road.
The bond of Vivian Yoconi as de
puty sheriff was approved.
The following bills were approved
and ordered paid.
James Daly, bounty, $15.
I. Johnson, bounty, $60.
O. Keithly, bounty, $21.
W. H. Hill, bounty, $4.
J. H. Cochran, bounty, $121.
Elmer Dickinson, bounty, $3.
C. G. Wright, bounty, $15.
T. H. Williams, bounty, $3.
Sylvanus Wright, bounty, $3.
Truman White, bounty, $3.
E. O. Neill, bounty, $9.
Fred Rauch, bounty, $2.
W. T. Craig, bounty, $19.
Elmo Nolan, bounty, $9.
J. It. Cochran, bounty, $51.
Lylo Mattoson, bounty, $21.
Milton Spurlork, bounty, $15.
E. J, Keller, bounty, $27.
W. W. Smead,, clerk, Env $12.50.
J. W. Sibley, bounty, $6.
1'. G. Farley, bounty, $18.
II .If. Steers, bounty, $18.
Ij. Jackson, bounty, $10.
Bill Kilkenny, bounty, $4.
C. n. Oral, sealer, $13.75.
Daisy Ileckot, Wid. Pen., $25.
Sadie Morcy, Wid. Ten., $17.50.
Hazel Logan, Wid. Pen., $17.50.
Rebecca Knight, Wid. Pen., $40.
Amy McFerrin, Wid. Pen. $17.50.
Lydia Ritchie, Wid. Pen., $17.50.
F. J. Gordon, poor, $2 5.
Ida Fletcher, poor, $15.
W. M. Kirk, poor, JesB Kirk, $30.
Andy Cook, poor, $30.
Dick Lahue, $50.
Lulu Johnson, Insane, $40.
C. C. Chick, H. Off., $9.25.
I'ac. Tel. Co., Ct house, $32.70.
L. P. Davidson, Ct. house, $30.75.
Paul McDuff(ee, sheriff, $80.
R. L. Benge, Co. court, $71.20.
Geo. McDuffee, sheriff, $15.40.
County agent, $225.
Neil Doherty, bounty, $9.
C. C. Shilling, bounty, $14.
Lena S. Shurte, travel, $25.80.
Lena S. Shurte, Supt., $15.
Mrs. C. W. Mi'Namer, Supt., $21.
County Clerk Emer. Clk., $25.
National Surety Co., bond deputy
sheriff, $2 5.
Humphreys Drug Co., indigent
soldier, $3.60.
Emanuel Hos., poor, $22.50.
E. J. Starkey, Cir. Ct., $7.
F. Shephard Co.. Dist At., $9.
II. J. Middle, coroner, $1.20.
J. .1. Wightiuan, coroner, $1.20.
John IlirsM, coroner, $1.20.
W. O. Haylrss. coroner, $1.20.
Frank Shively, coroner. $1.20.
1'. M. Uenimell, coroner, $1.20.
S. I.. Valentine, coroner. $2.70.
I'. 11. King, coroner, $1.70.
Fred Krug, coroner, $1.70.
l'oier Spehar, coroner, $1.70.
Leo Sprinkel, coroner, $1.70.
II. P. Stone, coroner, $1.70.
C. C. Chick, coroner, $5.00.
M. L. Case, coroner, $11.20.
Gay M. Anderson, coroner, $12.85.
Electa A. Mann, tax rebate, $4.49.
John Sehleevoight, tax reb., $22.17
T. J. Jones, tax Reb., $16.02.
Kuley, Raley & Steiwer. tax Reb.,
$9.26.
J. J. Wells, assessor, $10.
Gloss A Prudhomme, assessor,
$239. 65.
Oaiette-Times, printing, $67.30.
Kllham Sta. Co., $17.17.
Humphreys Drug Co., Mdse, $5.30.
Heppner Herald, Frtnt., $13.50
Tum-a-Lum Lbr. Co., $2.90.
Patterson & Son, Ct. house, $6.
West Disinfecting Co., $29.85.
Heppner L. & W. Co.. $23 92.
A. K. Perry, watermaster, $40.60.
J. W. Kirschner, 11. 11. IV. $4 5.
C. W. King, 11. 11. 1!., $34.50.
Carl Cason.. H. H. II.. $15.
Kalph Moore. H. 11. IV. $0.
W. O. Ilayles. 11. H. 1!., $2S,20.
Eddie ChUlsey, H. H. IV, $50.
Howard McDuft'ee. 11. H. IV, $24.
Heppner Herald, 11. H .IV. $65.
X. K. Floreodce. Wil. Creek. $.".
Mrs. Pearl Jarvis. Wil creek. $10.
llrittaiu Pros. Spl. 14H. $17.25.
Farmers Ele. Co., Spl. 14U, $21.80
j.iMi.ianui.iw.wiiaMin ma
mbihiiimmm
Tum-a-Lum Lbr. Co., Wil creek,
$6.15.
Standard Oil Co., H.H.B., $235.50
F. Shively, H. H. B $22.
Phelps Gro. Co., H. H. B., $5.
Clyde Equip. Co., H. H. B., $39.33.
K. L. Beach, H. H. B., $216.52.
Howard Cooper Corp., H. H. B.,
$440.55.
Peoples Hdw. Co., H. H. B., $25.55
Heppner Gar., Gen. roads, $2.60.
C. V. Hopper, Gen. roads, $8.6 5.
F. C. Malloy, B6, $9.86.
R. E. Harbison, B6, $41.08.
Boardman Trad. Co., B2, $47.68.
A. J. Knoblock, No. 15, $8.97.
Elbe Fuller, No. 15, $8.97.
H. J. Cox, No. 16, $4.50.
G. W. Kirk, No. 20, $6.50.
Feenaughty Mac. Co., No. 20,
$19.80.
M. F. Wadsworth, Spl. 1, $3.30.
Pendleton Sheep Co., Spl. 4,
$133.50.
Engleman Hdw. Co., Spl. 14B,
$2.85.
W. L .McCaleb, Gen. Rd., $155.58.
Humphrey Drug Co., H6, $5.30.
Martin Reid, H. H. B $22.08.
A. Z. Barnard, Spl. 14B, $4.20.
Independent Gar., Spl. 14, $4.20.
Bert Mason, Gen. Rds., $13.25.
First Nat. Bank, roads, $4266.49.
F. & S. G. Nat. Bank, roads,
$1004.54.
Bank of lone, roads, $109.86.
Arlington Nat. Bank roads, $70.61
R. L. Benge, Cason canyon, $50.
Frank Engleman, Cason canyon,
$292.77.
Martin Reid, Cason Can., $954.03.
Tum-a-Lum Lbr. Co., Cason Can.,
$559.75.
Heppner Herald, Cason Can., $65.
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Howard McDuffee, Cason Can. $42
Eddie Chidsey, Cason Can., $90.
W. O. Bayless, Cason Can., $107.
J. W. Kirschner, Cason Can, $90.
Martin Reid, Cason Can., $362.63.
Watt Ship Powder Co., Cason Can.
$14.94.
Brlstow & Johnson, Spl. 14 $28.87
J. S. Lieuallen, U. W. B $17.88.
K. L. Beach, H. H. B., $173.15.
C. H. Bartholomew, Spl. 5, $594.
Arthur Ayers, Spl. 5, $44.
Frank Helms, Spl. 5, $85.50.
L. D. Neill, Spl. 5, $398.50.
Dennis & Lee, Spl 5, $249.50.
E. O. Neill, Spl 5, $295.25.
State Accl. Ins. Com., H. H. B.,
$44.28.
R. L. Benge, H. H. B., $100.
W. L. McCaleb, Gen road, $166.66.
Sherman Shaw, H. H. B., $66.4!
Ray Howell, Dist. No. 20, $79.23.
Chas. Ashbaugh, Dist No. .20.
$65.78.
J. B. Adams, Dist. No. 20, $79.23
Joe Howell, Dist. No. 20, $23 9.2 Z
Frank Connor, No. 18, $32.94.
Frank Nixon, No. 16, $75.
Dan Barlow, No. 16, $30.17.
Bob Buschke, No. 14, $15.
TRIP TO MORO EXPERIMENT
STATION'
Details of the visit to the Moro
Experiment Station by the Morrow
County Wheat Growers have been
completed and present indications
are that a large number of local
farmers will make the trip. Many
of those who went last year are
planning on going again and others
who were unable to make the trip
have decided to do so this year. The
start will be made from the county
agent's office at Heppner at 9:00 a.
m., Friday, June 5. Short stops will
be made at Lexington and lone, leav
ing there at 9:45 and 10:30 respec
tively. Dinner will be eaten at Ar
lington and It is planned to reach
Moro by 3:00 o'clock. A short trip
will be made to some of the wheat
farms in that vicinity with Mr. D. E.
Stephens after the party arrives s
Moro.
Saturday, June 16, will be spent
at the experiment station and the re
turn trip to Morrow county will be
made the 17th. Everybody who can
possibly do so is urged to make the
trip and those going are requested
to notify the county agent as soon as
possible so that suitable arrange
ments can be made for transport
tion of those not having cars and
accommodations reserved at Moro.
Economy the Spirit
of the Times
DID YOU EVER STOP TO THINK WHAT
YOU PAY FOR FANCY CONTAINERS?
COfftE
IS A GOOD ILLUSTRATION OF THE FACT.
YOU PAY FROM 7c to 8c PER POUND
FOR THE LITHOGRAPHED CANS
WE CARRY A LINE OF BULK COFFEES AT
33k - 35c - 40c
PER POUND
Company
We take this means of expressing
to you, through the columns of what
we still call our paper, our appre
ciation of the splendid co-operation
accorded the office while we wer
privileged to serve you in the capaci
ty of County Agent.
Copper Carbonate has proven to
be more than we had dared to hope,
controlling the smut without any i
jury to the germination making it
possible to seed in the dust at the
same time reducing the rate of seed
ing 25 per cent. The seed can be
treated in advance of seeding too,
which is another great advantage.
It means that particularly every far
mer in the Northwest will be using
that method for treating this fall.
Every farmer who knows of the
method and the greatly increased
yields is already purchasing ma
chines with which to do the work.
So great will the demand for ma
chines be that it will be practically
impossible to secure them promptly
without ordering in advance and for
your protection wo have arranged to
have Mr. Ralph Finley who will be
our representative in that section,
call on you and show you the CAL
KINS IMPROVED WHEAT TREAT
ING MACHINE so that you can
place your order in the near future.
Mr. Finney will have 800 farmers to
see in Morrow and Gilliam counties
and it will be impossible to see you
all at once, THEREFORE, if you
will write us we will send you a cir
cular giving a clear cut of the im
proved machine and all details on
price and purchase.
You can then order direct at your
convenience. You will appreciate t
fact that you ordered early before
seeding time is over. Address com
munications to
CALKINS MACIHVK COMPANY
301 West lloono Ave.,
SPOKANE, WASHINGTON
Miss Doris Mahoney returned from
Corvallis Sunday evening where she
is a student at O. A. C.
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