Heppner herald. (Heppner, Or.) 1914-1924, May 08, 1923, Page PAGE SIX, Image 6

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    PAGE SIX
Tuesday, May 8, 1923
LOCAL NEWS
v ! !
Moth ru' Ony Sunday, 9:45 A. M.,
Federated Church.
kiif.f.t music Fori; ion $1.00.
HAUWOOIVS.
.Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Nokes, of Al
bany, are here attending the funeral
of their relative, R. E. Jones.
Dick MeEIIigott, well known
whtalBrower of the lone section, was
in towti Saturday jollying his many
l'riends).
Mothers' Day Sunday, 9:45 A. M.,
Fcderatd Church.
Good old Summer Time made his
advent list Friday and Saturday and
made u.i all feel glad to again make
tin acquaintance.
Ed Neill was in from his Butter
creek ranch Saturday looking pretty
well pleased with life. Mr. Neill has
one band of his sheep separated from
thilr fleece and this weather is fine
lor completing the job.
SIIIF.'I' MUSIC FOUIS FOK $1.00.
HAKWOOU'S.
On account of a rush of adver
tising an;l news matter reaching the
Herald on the eve of publication, the
pi'ofeedingH of the county court in
session last week, could not be
Mother:-)' Day Sunday, 9:45 A. M.,
jirinted. Tliy will appear next week.
Federated Church.
Mrs. S. A. 1'attison entertained the
bridge- chili Friday afternoon at a
jileasaiit parly at her home on the
bill. Aliuut 20 guests were present
honors going to Mrs. Fred Lucas, of
Lexington.
NIIFI'IT MUSIC FOLIC 1'OH $1.00.
II AKWOOO'H.
Miss Gladys Metealf, an instructor
in tbo Vancouver, Wash., high
sichool, spent the week end with her
mother, Mrs. Fisher, a,t Hotel Hepp
ner. Tha Vancouver schools do not
close this year until June IHh.
HHKK'f MUHIC l-'OUU FOIt $1.00.
. IIAKWOOIl'M.
LOST -On highway between llopp
er and Jako Wells ranch parcel
containing purso with change, ladles'
clothing and Improtant mail matter.
Kewaid lor relurii to this office or
to Mis. J. W. Harrison, Heppner, 1-p
Mr, and Mrs. Ralph Ftuley were
in town Friday. Mr. Finley has
taken llin agency for this county ot
the Calkins dry process smut treat
inn' machine, and is out pushing the
sale among the wheat men.
Hill I'aiiheig could not look pes
simistic if he were to try and ,he
never tries. Hill Is a wheat man
iukI I lift way things look now would
make anybody smile if he Is a good
clii.i'ii. I'adbeig was in town -Sat
unlay.
Ed Dennett was passing out cigars
to his fiieml.i Friday, the occasion
being the advent of a fine 8-pound
son at his home on Thursray. The
mother and babe are doing fine and
Ed is resuming normalcy as rapidly
as may be expected.
Alex Wilson is over from Board
man for a few days visit with his
parents and his little daughter who
lives with them. He says the alfalfa
is looking fine at Boardman and cut
ting will tX'gin about June 1st. Mr.
Wilson owns and operates one of the
best hay ranches on the project.
Frank B. Stevens, pioneer farmer
and stockman of upper Rock creek
in Gilliam county, was a Hepp
ner visitor Friday. Mr. Stevens has
resided in Portland for several years
but tho lure of the ranch still calls
him in the spring and summer time
when he spends considerable time
there. Mr. Stevens was a victim In
the Celilo train wreck a year or so
ago and was so badly injured that he
was in a hospital three months and
walked on crutches for a year.
B. F. Sorenson returned last week
from a trip through Grant county
where he looTted over the range and
cattle situation. Mr. Sorenson says
he has never seen the grass better
and he predicts better conditions for
the cattle industry. "If I had sheep
now," Mr. Sorenson said, "I would
sell them and buy cattle for cattle
are bound to come back." Mr. Soren
son has been dealing In cattle for
many years and used to deliver prime
beef cattle to the butchers for two
cents a pounnd.
VICTIM OF SUNDAY'S AUTO
WRECK 15CRIEI) TODAY
Tho funeral of Emmett Jones, who
was inslantly killed in an auto
wreck last Sunday on the highway
between here and Lexington, is be
ing held this afternoon at the Chris
tian church.
Robert Emmett Jones was born in
North Carolina and was 33 years, 11
months and 2 5 days old at tli,e time
ot his death.
He came to Oregon about 13 years
ago, settling at Heppner where he
has since resided.
He was engaged in the transfer
business and was universally loved
and respected because of his sterl
ing qualities as a citizen and neigh
bor. His wife died about three years
ago leaving him with four young
children to raise without a mother's
help and care. Mr. and Mrs. C. A
Miller, the children's maternal
grand-parents, have resided with the
family since the mother's death.
Besides his children, Mr. Jone.i
leaves one brother, C. N. Jones,
near Heppner, and seven sisters v'
reside in North Carolina. His father
also survives at the old southern
home.
Charles Hus'.on is In from Elpjht
mile today.
Wo arc oltViiiit; MASON CORD TIRES which
wo it ptirclwist'd before the advance at these
prices as long; as the present stock lasts:
,V x 3 Kabric $ 8.50
.V x Cord, Regular $11.50
,V v j1.! Cord, Oversize $13.00
31 x 4 S. S. Cord S-'.yJO
.V x J Cord S';.tx
33 x 4 Cold ?-5-30
31 x 4 Cord Sjo.oo
J-' x 4! j Cord $31.00
33 x 4' Cord $3. 50
31 x 4' j Cord sU-50
35 x 4'.j -Cord $34-50
j BA'
Heppner Tire &
Battery Company
Formerly C. V. HOPPER TIRE SHOP and
BATTERY ELECTRIC SERVICE STATION
Don't Forget Your Mother on
MOTHER'S DAY
MAY 13
1
OfSO
This is one day in the year sacred to mother,
tho mother who has devoted a lifetime of
days to bringing happiness into your life.
Don't let this day pass without showing her
that the wonderful love and devotion she has
lavished on you are valued and appreciated.
No present could bring her more joy, more entertainment in
her lonely hours, than a new model
"YORK" or "ROYAL"
BRUNSWICK PHONOGRAPH
Convenient terms can be arranged
If she has a Phonograph, get her some "Mother" Records:"
2098 "Somebody's Mother" "Where the Lazy Mississippi
Flows."
2287 "Mamrny Lullaby" "Swing Along"
5123 ."Mother, My Dear" "In the Moonlight"
13015 "Mother of Mine" "Smilin' Through"
13018 "Mother Machree" "Come Back to Erin"
The Music Shop
rfaHBEiQsiHaiBBEHiSEiHaBaaGHBBaBHSHHaaa:
iiiii
'FAT MORE WHEAT"
IS NATIONAL SLOGAN
Huge billboard?, -n almost every
American city are blazing forth the
line "Bread Is the Best and Cheap
est Food," part of a campaign insti
tuted by the milling industry to in
crease tho consumption of wheat
products. The billboards are main
tained by the Washburn-Crosby Mill
ing company, one of the largest con
cerns of its kind in the United
States.
In addition to this publicity the
same milling company and hundreds
of others are using the same line, to
gether with the slogan "Eat More
Bread" In practically all their ad
vertising work. Pamphlets setting
forth the food value of wheat pro
ducts are being circulated by the
millions. Advertising is appearing
in newspapers, trade publications
and magazines.
The campaign is expected by the
millers to result in huge increases In
the consumption of wheat prod
ucts. In urging the baking industry
to enter the campaign, ono milling
company declares that proper pub
licity given to the food value of
bread would result In an Increased
American consumption, of eight bil
lion loaves yearly. This, it is point
ed out, would be beneficial to far
mer, miller and baker.
"Advertising has increased the
consumption of. many products in
largo proportions," said a large mil
ler after the "Eat More Wheat"
drive had been launched. " A nota
ble example is the campaign in which
meat products were pushed in like
manner, only a short time ago. We
feel that wheat products must re
ceive the same sort of support, even
to maintain a balance with other
foods. But we expect to go further,
In developing and enlarging present
markets.
"The campaign will continue for
a year at least. By that time we
should have figures on results which
will convince every interested per
son of the merits of such a cai
paign."
AN UNSIGNED LETTER
A subscriber at lone writes the
Herald asking to have his address
changed to Morgan and forgot to
sign his name to the letter. Upon
receipt of the nane the change will
be made.
rPotatocs
Star Theatre I
, Program May 9 to 14, Inclusive
Wednesday and Thursday
THOMAS MEIGAN in
"IF YOU BELIEVE IT, IT'S SO"
Aesop's Fable, "The Wicked Cat" and
Topics of the Day
Friday
"FREE AIR," from Saturday Evening Post
story by Sinclair Lewis
Ruth Roland in last episode 'The Timber Queen'
"SALMON," one of the Field and Stream series
Fun From the Press
Saturday
JACKIE COOGAN in
"TROUBLE"
Leo Maloney in "DEPUTIZED"
Sunday and Monday
Admission 30c and 50c
WALLACE REID in
"ACROSS THE CONTINENT"
Snub Pollard in "THE OLD SEA DOG"
Coming Next Week
Marion Davis in "The Young Diana"
Clair Adams in "The Afan of the Forest," by
Zane Gray,
Chas. Hutchinson and Lucy Fox in "Speed"
Constance Talmage in "The Primitive Lover"
Cecil B, DeMille's big production, Manslaughter
Get a Copy of Our Descriptive Program
IONE MAX COMMITTED
TO INSANE ASYLUM
We have seventy sacks of finest quality Potatoes
all fine stock, sorted and re-sacked and in A
No. 1 condition. While they last they go at v
THE SACK
Call, write or phone your order
before they are all gone
GILLIAM & BISBEE
Phone 333
HEPPNER, OREGON
MR. FARMER
Bring In your fresh eggs. We take 'em, cash or trade. We
used over 500 doaeu last year in our pastries nd are now In
the market for more.
WK SELL FOR CASH AT CASH PRICKS
Bulk Cocoa, 20c pound, 2 for ; - 33c
Wilson or Armours milk, ! cans for 25c
Kellopgs Corn Flakes, 2 for- ."- - 23c
Flour from one pound up. Heppner bread, baked in Heppner,
?c a loaf, 3 loaves for '23c
HEPPNER BAKERY & CONFECTIONERY
Jack O'Grady, of lone, was ex
amined as to his sanity last Thurs
day and committed to the Eastern
Oregon Hospital for the Insane at
Pendleton. An aitendant from the
institution came over Friday and
took him over.
O'Grady has been around lone for
a year or more and was well liked
and respected. His allusions were
mostly big dreams in which Henry
Ford, President Harding and other
celebrities figured and he is said to
have written many letters to the
president and other notables. It is
believed a rest and proper treatment
will soon restore him to his usual
condition.
C. L. Sweek, of the firm of Wood
son & Sweek, is in Pendleton this
week attending the regular session
of federal court in session in" that
city. His firm have several cases on
the federal docket.
Work is going forward in good
shape at the Rodeo grounds,
tlvely mild winter and a plentiful su
...NOTICE OF TAKING UP
AND SALE OF HORSF.3
Notice Is hereby given that I, the
undersigned, under the laws of the
state of Oregon, have taken up the
animal hereinafter described while
running at large on my premises, in
Morrow county, Oregon, about two
miles wct of Heppner, Oregon, to
wlt: One sorrel horse with ball face
and right hind foot white. No visi
ble brand.
That I will, on
WEDNESDAY, MAY 23, 1923,
at 10:00 o'clock in the forenoon of
said day, unless the same Bhall have
been redeemed, at the Dutton ranch
west of Heppner, Oregon, sell said
animal for cash in hand to the high
est bidder, for the purpose of taking
up, holding and selling such animal,
together with reasonable damages
for the injury caused by said animal
running at large on said premises.
W, H. KEFFER.
Dated and first published this 8th
day of May, 1923. 2-3
. 72.DO
81. SO
. Kti.OO
105.02
10ti.."iO
113.53
Then! V ) 5-n
Was the most direct trans
continental route when it
was blazed and IS NOW
But it's easier to "negotiate" now than then,
and the REDUCED round trip
SUMMER EXCURSION
FARES
in effect daily between
May 15 and September 15
over the
UNION PACIFIC SYSTEM
will make it very attractive. Study this table.
$64.00 Buffalo .
72.00 ruisburgh
Kansas City
St. Louis
Chtcnfto
Detroit
Cincinnati .
Toronto .
Yushinton
Philadelphia
New York
bnton
Atlanta .
Montreal .
$120.62
119.76
141.56
144.92
147.40
1 53.50
117.55
132.75
with corresponding fares to ether important centers.
Final return limit October 3 1st. Liberal stop-over
privileges going and returning.
A side trip to Yellowstone at small additional
cot will arford the experience oi a life time.
Call us bv phone and let ua make all your arrangement.
It coat no more and will save you lots oi worry.
DAKBKE, Agent .Heppner, Ore.
Wm. McMVRARY,
Passenger, Agt., Portland, Ore.