The Lebanon express. (Lebanon, Linn County, Or.) 1887-1898, February 01, 1889, Image 2

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    Express
FRIDAY! FEBRUARY 1, 15S9.
LINN CO. REPRESENTATIVES.
lion. R. A. Irvln, our State Senator,
who is now serving his second term, is
a native rf Missouri. He crossed the
plains In 1847 and some time during
the folio-wing year settled in the forks
f the Santiam. He nerved this coun
ty four years aa sheriff, and held sever
ed positions of emolument and trust,
all of which he has filled with credit to
himself end satisfaction to his consti
tuents. He is an astddious worker and
looks well to the interest of his friends
and to the section that he re resent.
Hon. R. C Miller was born in Cooper
-county, M,t in 1824, emigrated to'An-
fSrew county, of the same state, in IS41.
In 1S47 he joined the tide of sturdy
nd bold pioneers for this vallsy; in
he settled four miles south of Leb-
ntiou, on a donation claim where he
has followed the "even tense of his
way,' as a quiet, industrious citizen,
until two years ago he moved to Ieba
iioh. Mr. Miller has never engaged in
public life till now, but has met with
huectss in all the bu.- hiess relations of
life, accumulating much of the world's
goods au.l raising a large, respectable
family, wto occupy high, social and
business relations. He is a man of few
word, but of very decided action and
well competent to look after the inter
est of his constituents.
Mr. J. B. R. Morslock is a native of
- Tennessee and came to Oregon in 1873
.and was so well pleas.-d with his change
that he forever bade good -I y to his na
tive home. He was bom in Morris
town, Tenn, in 1S43, and was in that
state when the war bivke out. In pol
itics Mr. Morelock is a Democrat and
"was elected as a Representative from
Linn county by His Democratic
friends. He is now located at Browns
ville, Oregon, and is engaged in the
milling business. This is his first pub
lic oftiee, and he seems to be filling it
"Very successfully.
Hon. Jeff Myers is -perhaps the
youngest member of the legislature,
being only 28 years old. He is a na
live to the "manner born;' a genuine
webfoot of noble ancestors. He was
born at Seio, where his father and
"grandfather still lesCde. They are all
noted for their enterprise, thrift and
honesty. Mr. Myers is a grandson of
(ireen McDonald, whose poople figur-
ed so conspicuously. in the Itvvolution
ry war in C Mr. Myers gives
promise of great future usefulness, and
-.Linn county is proud of her boy Rep
resentative. All of the above gentle
men are decided Democrats true to
their party true to. their country's in
terest and of positive moral and relig
.ious standing.
THE LEGISLATURE.
There have been a great many bill,
Introduced this, week, but none have
as yet Income a law, that would inter
est our readers. The Bull Run water
question for Portland has absolved
most every other question in the sen
ate. It will doubtless become law as
It is of vital Interest to the city of Tort
land and will add greatlj to the pros
perity of our queen city. A bill for the
purchase of the Oregon City locks by
the State, and thereby reduce the ex
pense of shipping, will doubtless be
come a law. JMorelock's but ameiui
ing the school law, will certainty re
ceive the approval of the people at
large. Jennings has introduced a me
morial the department of agriculture
and tor the election of U. B. Senators
by a direct vote. There is a good deal
of hard work being manifested, and
also a good deal of sparring. Some of
the members are like croqueting they
arc merely playing for position. Yeiy
few bills havens yet become a law, the
most of them only passing the first
reading, and some committed to the
standing committee. We will endeav
or to give a summary of all that be
comes a law. We note with pride the
one leading fact, which ia, that all
seem to be working for the best inter
est of the people and for the general
welfare of the state. We think it was
right to iucrease their salary to $3 per
day. We cannot expect to command
the time and brains of rlrst-class men
without compensation.
W. C. T. U. ASD SUNDAY COLUHH.
SAY "NO.
SAMOAN TROUBLES.
Whenever you are asked to drink.
Pause a moment, ray loy, nnd think:
Think of the wrecks on life's wean touted
Who angered "yen" without counting the cot.
Think of the mother who oorc you In pnln:
Think of her tour that will full like the win;
Think of hT heart, how cruel the blow;
Think of her love, and then answer, no."
Think of dour ho;x-i that arc drowned in the howl;
Think of Ike dusiKC.r to body and soul;
Think .-fthe sad live, onee puiu vt the Know,
Look at them now, and I lieu aiuwcr, "no."
Think of a manhood's rum-tainted, iirvnth;
Think tin the glass lead to sorrow and death;
Think of the homes that nre shallowed with woe:
That might have been heaveni had some one said
"no."
Think of lone grave, unwept auiTunknown,
Hiding life'K hopes, onee fair as our own;
Think of loved tonus forever laid low.
Who still would be here had they learned to hay
"no."
Think of the demon who lurks In the bowl,
Whoee touch is mill to body and toul;
Think of all this as on life' journey you go.
And hen the ford trtnpter assails you say "no."
KKKP I'.ISY.
"BETTING ON ELECTIONS.
SeTMiSetaj Jso. 4, introdutl by Mr.
-Hatch of-Pwlkceuiity, proposes an act
'.to forbid -al jMittish betting on clec
"dios. SweJa -irai-act ia certainly" de
' inauded by orations of public
. policy. It .will -fee seen that tne bill
"Jflroywxses not only tejrwpish those who
Jay wagers On the Tesult of any elee
n ion in tids state, :hut to make stake
holders liaWeofhetate for the full
-value 'of 'tnoney or other property
p'laeed in'their liands, and to forfeit to
-ilhe sehool fund the money or property
Jiujiually wagered. There is no ques
tion of the fact that gambling on the
iite election had much to do with the
results. If the Republicans bought
Totes the Democrats sold them, one is
just as guilty as another, and no pa-j
t riot can be indifferent to the great j
danger of debauching and corrupting j
cur government by this wicked prac
tice. In addition to the great calam
ity of the nation, gambling on the elec
I.on is the same in principle as betting
:a cards or dice, and unless something
i- done to protect the purity of the
illot, and preserve the morals of our
country, we will soon become a na
tion of blacklegs. Betting on the elec
tion in Linn eoanty was immense this
. year, and that, too, by men of high so
cial standing, and, in some instances,
. by members of the church. The whole
thing is disgraceful and mantles the
cheek of civilization itself with shame.
Samoa Inland is one of a group of
nine islands in the Pacific ocean, in
area is only about 23o square miles,
and the population, all told, will not
exceed 4500. It is, however, a strate
gic point for coaling :nd for military
and naval puro-s. Samoa "s sul d
over by native chiefs, and the people
have only in the last few decades
emerged from a "narious life. In
1873, by treaty, The United States as
sumed a protectorate over them by
their own request. In ISA) Urcat IJ-it-uin,
Germany aud the United States
formed a triple nlliay.ee by which
neither one would take possession, but
each agreed to occupy coaling stations.
A few months ago Germany captured
and carried away the real and rightful
ruler, and placed on the throne a rebel
chief and one that was in sympathy
with German interest and German a-
cendency. It seems hardly probable
that two great nations would goto war
abort so small a matter, and yet there
is a strong probability of serious trou
ble. Bismarck ha been dictating the
policy of Europe so long that he has
become insolent, and now flaunts his
insults in our face. We are opposed to
war, on principle, but we do hope our
government will not humble itself nor
lower its flag to even a Bismarck. We
cannot afford to let a foreign power es
tablish a naval and military depot so
near our western shore. Germanj- has
a half million soldiers uuder arms; but
at one bugle blast of alarm more than
a million of true American patriots
will leap to their country's call trom
north, south, east and west, and Ger
many will find foemen worthy of her
steel.
If you expect God to choose you for
a great work, be busy ; ho seldom se
lects Idlers. When he wished a deliv
erer for Israel, he went into the wilder
ness for Moses, who was watching
sheep ; when he wanted a niau to save
his people from the Midianitea, he sent
for Gideon, who was threshing wheat ;
when he wanted a man after his own
heart to lie king of Israel, lie sent for
David, who was keeping sheep.
Idlers do not suit ; the Rord wishes
those who are not only willing to
work, but who are liard at it. Idlers
are too often lazy, and that may often
tie the cause of their idleness. Such
seldom have enough ambition to take
care of tlu-mselves, let alone caring for
the Rord's work. Rut idlers suit sutan
exaetlj. lie likes such cs have no ein
biti m, for they make the best slaves.
The devil wants sl ivis fur his work,
but God wants something letter. He
wishes men and women who have am
bition, who take an interest in their
work; he wishes servants who are anx
ious to r:s;', for he means to promote
them some day. From servant t lie
adopts them into his family, and
makes them his children.
Ill' RAH lr-OK JAl'AS.
EVKIiyilOSf READ THIS.
It is nn invariable rule, says an ex
change, that a man who is stingy and
penurious nbtiut advertising Is stingy
and pennriouH in his other business
transactions. The fame buwiness spirit
and enterprise that prompts a man to
use printer's ink liU-rally In making
his business known, prompts 1.1m to
deal liberally with his customers ho
that he may hold their trade. The
man who t-itu in his store and waits for
customers to hunt him un does not
hnv; many of them, and, consequent! v
heimust make the. most of those lie
has. On the other hand; the man
who, week after week, Invites the pub
lie, through the medium of the news
paper, to come and examine his goods,
telling them when he has new goods,
and when sps'cial bargains are being
eft'ered. naturally e.ttraets more trade
thati his sduggish neighbor, and ho can
afford to sell his goods cheaper. In
addition to this, the reading public is
indebted to the advertisers fir enabling
them to get a cheaper newspaper.
Were it not for the revenue derived
from advertising, papers that are sold
for two dollars a year could not bepui
chssed for four times that amount.
These facts are worth considering
when buying goods, and buyers will
always find that they work for their
own interest when they pitronizo the
liberal advertiser.
Much the Newest
Nobbiest and Largest Stock of
CLOTHING
THIS INTERESTS YOU.
-:o:-
In the County
Is Now to be Seen e invite you to come and look through our Mam
moth Stock oi
ON THE COUNTERS
-OF
L. E. BLAIN,
l-OF-l
Albany, Oregon.
When you want to
Groceries, Provisions, Tobacco, Cigars,
Crockery, Glassware, Lamps, Etc.
HXu&ciuito Orae and Timothy ced.
t
dress up," we would fpTinp rrifirKSrPITT T WPTrUTQ TQ HTTP MOTTO
in,i oUmr rftii 9 : i tnu uuuuuai uiu iv livjii i u iu uun mui i J.
1 through and make the
bright price.
f Hides Furs and all kinds of Country Produce taken iii exchange for goods.
LEBANON PRODUCE MARKET.
Corrected wvkly by C. B. Montague.
Flour Per 50-tb sack, ?1 15; per bar
rel, 54 oO.
iir.con Sides, lGc per lb.
Butter Fresh, per 2-lb roil, 40c.
Kjrjra Per dozen, 16;c
Chickens Per dozen, S3 50 to ?4 50.
iXteks Per dozen, common, ?4 50 to
! So; Pekin, 6.
(ieese Per dozen, ?.
Turkeva Per lb, live weigbt, 10c.
Ilides-Per lb, dry, 6c; green, 3Jc to
4c.
Sheep pelts According to wool, 15
to 50c.
Deer skins Summer, 30c; winter, 25c
DON'T.
Don't snub a boy because he wears
tdiabby clothes. When Edison the
inventor of the telephone, first entered
U ston, he wore a pair of yellow linen
breeches in the depth of winter.
Don'tannba boy becaue his home
is plain and unpretending. Abraham
liincoln's early home was a log cabin.
Don't snnb a boy because of the ig
n'oranee of his parents- Shakespeare
t he world's poet, was the son of a man
vho was unable to write his own name.
Don't snub a boy because h? chooses
humble trade. The auther of the
lMri:a Progress wii a tinner.
Don't snub a boy became of physical
disability. Milton was blind.
Don't snub a boy because of dullness
i,t his lessons. Hograth, the cclebrat-
1 painter and engraver, was a stupid
1 iy at his lessons.
Don't snub a bo because he stutters.
I'H-moBthones the greatest orator of
lreece, overcame a harsh and stnm
laering voice.
Don't snub anyone. Not alone be
liLcause some clay they may far out
strip you in the race of life, but because
it is neither kitid, nor right, nor ChrLv-
tran.
Benjamin Harmon will be fifty-five
years, six months, and fourteen days
old fc-iten he is inaugurated President
of the United States. His distinguish
ed grandfather was sixty-eight years
old at the1 time of taking the oath of
o Glee, fort y-sevn years ago- Time
other Presidents were nrty-hve years
old at the beginning of their adminis
trations. They were Martin an IS lr-
en, Zachary Taylor, and Rutherford B.
Hayts.
Several years ago Chamberlain & Co.,
of Dcs Moines, Iowa, commenced the
manufacture of a cough remedy, be
lieving it to be the most prompt and
reliable preparation j-et produced for
coughs, colds and croup, that the pub
lic appreciate true merit, and in time
it was certain to become popular.
Their most sanguine hopes have leeii
more than realized. Over three hun
dred thousand bottles of Chamberlain's
Cough Ilemedy are now sold each year,
and it is recognized as "the lest made,"
wherever it is known. It will cure a
severe cold in less time than any other
treatment. For sale by M. A. Miller.
Tt may be a big thing and sound
well to talk about hundreds of acres of
wheat; but the future prosperity of our
i mtry d3p?nds on something else.
Until these hundreds of acres are di
vided and sold to small holders end
f rmed to .something else besides wheat
i-4id barley our county will make very
little progress m material prosperity.
3"i vide 500-3 acres among one hundred
Industrial men, and let them plant a
p.nion of it in vines o.nd fruits, and
mother portion in alfalfa, and the
lime will speedily come when the pro
duct will not be hynothetioally ?100,
000 but actually $300,000 to $1,000,000.
Add to this ths increase of property
vuluations in th? form of buildings,.
- nces and other improvements, and
' can see at a glance what benefit
'-' ion and diversififrd farming
the country. -
The Japanese have eepaiaUd Shinto
ism and BudJIsiu from the govern
ment, a-id abolished their adniinetra
tive Bureau cf Religion. Universal
toleration prevails. The ancient faiths
are considered barbaric and incompat
ible vith the new career of the empire.
The government acknowledges itself
to b; without a religion, and is consid
ering what form of western cultus it
may best adopt. They have legally
recognized the Christian Fabbath, and
it is observed i:s a day of rest by a!!
government cfiievs, the public, schools, j
banks, etc.
Ttcv. I. P. Msrtin delivered a most
excellent sermon in the Presbyterian
church last Sunday evening on the
subject "The Embassadors." Mr.
Martin has just reaehed his majority,
and giv-3 promises of great usefulness.
He has o;i!y been in Oregon some six
months, having been sent by the M.
E. Church South, to take charge of
thtir work at Ppicer. He has made a
fine impression on this community
and we sincerely hope that he may
rnake Oregon his future home.
There are two metting going on in
town; one in the rresbyterian church
conducted by the pastor end assisted
by Rev. Gillespie, of Newport; ths eth
er in tVe M. K. Church conducted by
the pastor and assisted by the Rev. I.
P. Martin, of Spieer. These meetings
arc both well attended and we trust
will result in great good.
The Catholic Directory for 10, just
issued, is more than usually interest
ing, from the fact that this is the een
teuuiel year of the establishment of the
Roman Catholic hierarchs in the unit
ed States. The figures have been fur
nished by the Dioctsm Chancellors,
and make the total Catholic popula
tion of the Uuited Srates 8,157,0"G.
Mrs. Rounds, the lady evangelist,
will not preach in the Cumberland
Presbyterian church, as was announc
ed some time ago, on account of the
meetings in town. We will give no
tice in the near future when her meet
ing will commence.
Rev. J. AV Craig will hold quar
terlv meetings as follows: Ilarris-
burg, Feb. 2d and 3d; Liberty church,
Feb. 9th and 10th ; Junction, Feb.
leth and 17th ; Center school house,
Feb. 19th; Albany, Feb. SSrd and 4th
The secrets of much success in this
world are cash, confidence, cheerful
ne.-s, an ' constancy.
Nin?ESplASANTlTIVE
A Pleasing Sense of Health an3
Strength Renewed, and of
Ease and Comfort
Follows the use of Syrtip of Figs, as it fccU
gently on tha
Kidneys, Liver and Bowels
Effectually Cleansing the System whett '
Coctive or Bilious, Dispelling
Colds, Headaches and Fevers
and permanently curing
HABITUAL CONSTTPATIOH
without weakening or irritating ti-.s organs
on which it acta.
For Bala in BOo and Sl.OO Bottles hj all
Lesalnt; Dragg-lsts.
uxxvrxmnKO oxit bt ttt
CALTTOESIA. HQ STBTJP CO.
8as Fsisctsco. Cax..
Uranut, Kt., 'mt Tosk. X. T.
LEBANON
nincr lVTill
A 1(4,1 111 I p. llllllj
KLEPPER, SON & AMBLER,
PnOPltlETORS.
MAKE TO ORDER
We Guarantee Fair Treatment to All.
W. B. DONACA.
Corner Brick Store, Main Street, Lebanon, Linn County, Or.
ALL. FRESH.
Moulding,
and
Sash, Doors
Blinds.
I have just FO L SDowX. what farmers
need. They're D1ZA D gone on my new
harrow, made 7AT independent sec
tions, to order ; e.4ch section can
be cleaned and moved without trou
ble. Wagon snd BO X and set of har
ness for sale cheap for cash. Iron har
rows or any other work done to order
at the Fed From blacksmith shop.
Joseph Harbix.
Croup is a terror to young mothers,
especially during the winter months,
as it is then most prevalent. It can
always le prevented, if properly
treated as soon aa the lirst symptoms
appear. Hoarseness is the fii-st symp
tom; this is soon followed by a peculiar,
roujrh couh. If Chamberlain's Cough
Ilemedy is freely given as soon as these
symptoms appear, it will invariably
p'revent the attack. There is no dan
ger in giving the remedy, as it enntains
no injurious substance. For sale by
M. A. Miller.
Look out for the Red Cross, but
don't get mad and stop your paper;
come right along and make the poor
printer glad, lie uly wants what he
has worked for.
An ordinary person is 5 feet G inches
high, weighs 138 younds, has 3000 ac
quaintances, walks "miles a day, earns
10 a w.ek, has 481 ounces of brain
matter, breathes S times a minute, tak
ing in a pn "vj al'fcach breath, is
good look-Hryrun lift 120 pounds, lives
50 3-ears, lays by a small fortune, can
write 22 words a minute, can live five
minutes without air, 10 days without
sleep, (5 days ', thout water, and is sub
ject to 20" 0 ' .''.t disease.
30.
t Tany dralw run he has tna TT. L. Ionp
hwfl without Eurnn kdi! crlc MiktritMHl 4
ttia kottoiu. pat film uoirn ua Inn
s
DRY AND DRESS LUMBER
For .All Purposes.
Havo on Hand a Supply of
Seasoned Flooring.
'OYERLAfiD TO CALIFORNIA
VIA
SOUTH EI1N PAC I FIC COM PAN Y's?
LIKE.
In connection with my jewelry estab
lishment, 1 nave aduea a
8KLECT STOCK
At Cost! Still to the FrontI
OF
Fresh Candies, Huts & Cigars.
$3 SHOE
FOR
GENTLEMEN.
93.00 Or.M ISK FIASn-SKWFD SHOE.
II ANU-SEY.l HM.I SIIOK.
t3.SO I'OI.KK AM) FABMEKS' SHOE.
Si.SO KTR.l V XI.I E C.tl.F SHOt.
WOKS!GM AS'S SII?!-
ri.iioandNi.rt hots sihool. sroes,
AU cwle in t'ouirress Huitoa and La?.
W. L. DOUGLAS
S3 SHOE lafdTe8.
Best Material. Itrf-i SfTl-. Beat Pitt !n.
U cut v.id bv ynur d. ah-r, wiire
TV. L. DOLGL.U. BUOCKTOX, MASK
For Wulo liy
C. C. HACKLEMAN.
FORTMILLER & IRYIKG,
ALBANY,
OREGON.
WATERLOO.
Wateuixk), Jai
Everybody in good health.
Geo. Gross is still kicking and fixing
up for a big run in the summer.
We did not fail to sec the red cross
on our last weeks paper. A good .re
minder. T. 5f. Divine's grand ball comes off
the 8th of February. Everybody cor
dially invited.
F. M. Carter gave us a pleasant call
this week; was here looking after his
real estate interest.
Waterloo U not entirely !ead yet as
your correspondent is able to sit up in
an easy chair aud finger a pencil.
Rod a has loen out every month tUis
winter. We have the Pontoon Uridge
fixed up in good shape and intend
putting it alloat this week.
Tmr TiirMR.
Obituary.
Mrs. Mary Ann Rimms (nee Gibson)
was born in Hancock county, III.,
March 23d, 1S12, and died iii S.da
ville, Oregon, Jan. 17, 1S83. Rhc leaves
a s'ster, Mrs. Jas. IJoyics, who resides
near Sodavill, and three children, two
girls and a boy, besides h husband anl
many friends lo'inourii her loss. Her
remains ve;c taken to Lebanon where
they were hiid to rest awaiting the fi
nal resurrectioiijjJjUe-Kleeping dust,
when tboy'msy shine forth in all the
beauty of an heir of glory. The family
and relatives have thy sympathy of
1 1 lie com in u n i t y in t h el r s;m 1 be iva ve-
tucnt-. W . A. Mr; H Ei:.
Menufnrturors of aal l)alert In all Kinds
Furniture.
Import all First-Class Goods
DIRECT FROM THE EAST.
A oomnlete stock of Wall Taper, IXco
rutions and Window Shades.
UNDID I TAKING
A SPECIALTY.
St. Charles Hotel
LEBANON, OREGON,
W. Corner Vain and Shermnn Streets,
Blocks Kiist of Railroad I)ci)Ot.
Two
H. E. PARRISH, Manager.
raVIca Supplied with the Best the
Market Affords.
Sample Rooms and tht? Tiost Accommodation for
CVnumerciul Men.
GENERAL 8TAGE OFFICE.
The ML Shasta Route.
Tiaia Between Alljaay tii Sm Fran
cisco, 35 Hosrs.
California Express Trains Run Daily
BETWEEN PORTLAND AND
SAN FRANCISCO.
ma Til. setvu.
tffllr. M..l.v Port land Ar...lD:lj . M
8:P r. M....LT..... Aibunv Lr... f :IS t. K.
T.45 a. -a Vr San f raa;-tco....l.v 7:0 r. a.
Local Passenicar Trains Dally (except Sunday)
R:iW a7m.."..I.C rortflir.d Ar... 3:15 r.
1.' -w r. M....I.V Albany l.v...ll:M a. m.
2:10 r. 31. ...Ar Kugrng Lv... . M.
Local Passenger Trains Dally (except Sundl
The candy ia hotU h.ad and machine
rna:e, ana is ine
Finest Assortment
EVER BROUGHT TO TOWN.
Mj- stock of JrwV.ry 15 c;plcte: bsTB J-s.-t re-
ceivt-a mppo vi
ISEAV CLOCKS.
Call and inspect my goods.
C E. HARDY.
5:45 x. M....LT lbanon
6:50 A. Ar Albany
2:00 r. . ...Lv ....... l.rbanon.....
2 45 P. M.... Ar Albanr..
.. Ar
...Lt
.Ar.
.Lr..
. l:3rt r. .
!2:S0 P. Jl.
. 06 r.
. SiXl P. JJ.
Pullman Buffet Sleepers.
TOURIST SLEEPING CARS,
For aect.nnuodation of cfecond-Clnns
Pa.ssewgera, attached to
Express Trains.
"Hio O. i r. H. R. Ferry makes corsnortkm wllb
nil I he rf:ni!ar train in trie tast hide Mv. rrom j
foot uf t rett, I ortland.
West Side Division.
BKTWKKK
PORTLAND and C0RVALLIS
THK YAQUINA ROUTE.
OREGON PACIFIC RAILROAD
Oregon Development Co' s SteamsMp Line
G. W. SIMPSON,
.llany, Oregon,
Having purchased the stock of Clothing, Genta' Fur
nishing Goods, Boots, Shoes, Etc., of C. B. Roland
cfe Co. i3 now prepared to offer
Better Bargains than Ever!
Having a complete assortment of General Merchandl&a;
bought at a big discount, which he still proposes to sell at
cost, purchasers will do well to "call and get bis prices before
buying elsewhere, as you can save from 25 to SO per centw
rJThe highest market price pa for country produce of all
kinds, either in cash or goods.
CRUSON & MILLER,
225 SHORTER, 20 HOUR8 LE88 TIME
Thnn by any other Route.
Flrat Claas Through Fnnttr Tpelgh
raua -
i From Prvrtland ami all Toints In the Willamette
Valley to ami I rum an trancisco, tai.
OREGON PACIFIC RAILROAD.
Mall Train Dally (except Sunday).
7 :fla. m....l.v.. fortlaml..
12:i p. in Ar CorvaHi.-
Ar.". -JO i. m.
I.T1:: p. m.
At Albany and t'orvalli connect with train!) ol
On-fwn 1'iirifip Itailroad.
Exprett Train Dally (except Sunday).
4:Sti p. ra....Lv roriiand
fflO r. m....Ar MeMinvllle..
TIME SCHEDULE, (Except Sunday:)
I.v. Alba.st. 1KW p.m. I I.v. YqriSA. 6:45 a. m.
l.y. roriLU.l:Wp. m. 1 tT.ioEVALuiu:ii. m.
Ah. YaqiIka 5-.SU p. tn. Ak. Albany, 11:10 a. m.
Ar.
... .Lv.
..9:00 a. ni.
.S:4S a. m.
THROUGH TICKETS
To All oliit
SOUTH AND EAST YIA CALIFORNIA.
9-Kor full Information rpimrflnp rnt, map!',
etr., rrtU on company's agent rtt Allianv.
K. KOI.Hi.Ki:, K. IV RiMJKRfl.
Mimaser Asst. ti. F. l"aw. Agent.
O C Train naiuwt at Alliany and C'orvallU.
The alK)Te Traliu connect at Yaqiiin with the
Orennti lH'vt'lnpment Company't Line of
steamships between Yaquina aud
rtttn Francidco.
SA I I.I NO DATKS :
btkambk. T Froni S. F. I f rom Yaqnina.
Willamette Vallfy I
Willamette Vailey 1
Willnmetle Valley I
lee. 6
IH-c. 17
lHc. 30
1
Iec. l
Dec. 34
Thi Oiinpntty reserves Uo right to change Sail
ing date without notice.
PacsenfrT from Portland, and nil Willamette
Vullfv i-.iin!9. ran make close ronnrrtkm with
h. Trt. of tin. Yaovina Koi-rn at Albany or
torv alli'. and if destined to 8an Franeiseo. should
' . : A v.i.nin. tia araiiimf Kofrtra
the date of sailing.
PoHon(icr'nnd FroljirUt llntes
ALWAYS THE LOWEST.
-DEALERS IK-
WAGONS, BUGGIES, HACKS,
AND ALL KINDS F
TOR INFORMATION APTLY TO
f. H. IIASWFJ.L.
Gen') Kr't A l'a Au't.
Ureiron Development Co.
301 Montgomery St.,
San Francisco, Cal'a.
C. F. HlXiCR,
Act'itOen l F. P. Agt,
O. P. R. R. R. Co.,
CorvaUiK,
Oregon.
Brownsville, Orajsn.
SECURE PRICES.
Ho Trouble to Show Goods
AT-
DEYOE & KOBSON'S,
'Alkaxy, Or.
TINWARE AND HARDWARE
OF ALL KINDS
Willamette RiYer Line of Steamers,
THK-WM. M. IIOAO," T11E "N. 8. BENTLY,"
THK "THREK HISTmS"
Are In wrvlce for both passenRor and freight
trarnc between ronriillis and Torlland and Inter
mediate joint", learine company's wharf, Corval
li. and Mcwrn. Huimiin Co.' wharf. No. 200
and Front Mreet, Portland, Mondara. Wednes
days! and Fridays, muking three round trips each
week aa follow'.
HOItTH Bor sp.
Veli-icles, Implements,
TOOI- OF X-I SORTS,
Light and HeavyMachines,
BARB AND SMOOTH WIRE,
IRON, STEEL, COAL,
GUNS AND AMMUNITION.
Call in, Gentlemen, and we
Happy.
will Make You
1ST
Leave Corvalll Monday, Wednesday,
a m 1.iv Alhanv a. m.
Arrive Salem. Mo'ndiiv. Wednesday, Friday, S
p. tu.; leave Salem, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday,
Arrive Portland, Tuesday, Thurvlay, Saturday,
8:3U p. tu.
SOVTH B0CSI.
Leave Portland, Monday, Wednesday, Friday,
6 Arrive Salem. Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 7:15
p. m.: leave Salem, Tuesday, Thursday. Saturday,
6 a.m. 1-ave AUmny 1::0 p. m.
Arrive t'orvuilU Tuesduy, Thursday and Satur
day s:m p.m.
Notioe of Dissolution.
OTICfc 13 HEREBY OIVCN THAT THE;
co-partnership beretofore existing between
D. Andrews and C. C. Hacklemao. partners doing
buaineiM nnderthe firm nam of Andrews Haek-j
I leman. ia tUU day diwlvd by mutual eowent.!
Friday, ' t. c Harklanan will continue tbe bustnesa at the.
old rtand, and will collect all rUinndue ana paj
all demands against the late Arm. j
Lebanon, Or., Jan. 1. 1S. j
Thanking the public for their liberal patronage.
In the past, I ask a continuance of the anne, and.
will endeavor to so conduct my bMnoas a to!
merit the patronage and gaod will of all. Call:
and see my goods and learn prices. j
C. C. IIACKLKHAN. i
J. L. Cowan.
J. M. Ralston
BANK OF LEBAH0U,
Lebanon, Oregon,
Transacts a General Banting Business.
Account Ka?t Subject to Ckeak.
EirhD( Sotrt on w Vorh.Saa Fraw
claco, PrtlaBt and Albany. ttMgsaw
Collections Made on Farorable Terntn.
Paints, Oils and Brushes
AT- -
DEYOE & ROKSON'S,
Albany, Qj.
AT
DEYOE & ROBSON'S,
Ai j-.axv, Or:.
FINE LINE OF GUNS; DEYOE & ROBSON
AND
Good Stock" of Afflfflnnition
AT
DEYOE & KOBSON'ri,
AXE AGENTS FOK
Tha New High-Arm Davis Ver-v'"
tical-Feed
SEWING MACH I Nr. ,
Best Maoliine in y x
4
I Vs t -
r .
4. C .:
S5