Albany weekly democrat. (Albany, Linn County, Or.) 1912-1913, June 14, 1912, Page 3, Image 3

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    WEDNESDAY
BOOZE CAUSES SNYDER AND
JOHNSON TO WORK FOB CITY;1
Throngs Hear Noted Man Talk
To Students at Corvallis
Yesterday Noon.
SPEAKER ADVOCATES MOVE
FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACE
Many People From Albany and
Other Valley Towns Attend
Exercises at 0. A. C.
Plead Not Guilty in Court This
Morning. Given Hearing
by Judge and Fined
Dr. David Starr Jordan, president
of Stanford University, delivered a
strong commencement address at the
Agricultural College in Corvallis yes
terday, which many people from Al
bany and other towns of the Willam
ette Valley had the pleasure of hear
ing. The subject of President Jordan s
address which was given yesterday
nnnn in the hiir uvmnasium of the
college was, "The Case Against
War." He presented many grave
and weighty arguments tor interna
tional peace.
"It may be that war is sometimes
justified," said Dr. Jordan. "It is
sometimes inevitable, whether neces
sary or not. It has happened once
. in "our history that 'every drop -of
blood drawn by the lash must be
drawn again by the sword.' It cost
us 6511.001) lives of young men to get
rid of slavery. North and South, the
nation was impoverished Dy tne ios.
A new sreneration ha
men and women born since tne war.
They have taken the nation's prob
lems into their hands; but theirs are
hands not so strong or so clean as
though the men that are, stood
shoulder to shoulder with the men
that might have been. The men that
died in 'the weary-time' had better
stutT in them than the father of the
average man 'today. Those slates
which' hist most of their strong young
blood will not gain the ground they
lost, not for centuries, perhaps never.
"I5v the h'.v of pr. bf.l'i'-ity tis de
veloped by Quetelet it is claimed that
there will appear in each generation
the same number of potential poets,
artists, investigators, patriots ath
letes, and superior nun of each de
gree. This law, however, involves the
theory of continuity and paternity,
that in each generation a practically
equal percentage of men of superior
mentality will survive to take the re
sponsibilities of parenthood. Other
wise this law becomes subject to the
action of another law. that of reversed
selection, or the biological law of
'diminishing returns.'
"In other words, breeding from an
' inferior stock brings race degenera
tion, and such breeding is the sole
agency of such degeneration; as se
!.....: nt, r artificial, along one
line or another, is the sole agency of
race progress. And all laws of port
abilities and averages are subject to
a still higher law, the primal law of
biology, which no cross-current 01
life can check or modify. Like the
seed in the harvest; almost alike but
never quite, but on the whole always
following the lead. There is in fact
no law of Quetelet, save this: Under
like conditions heredity runs alike
almost alike but with like variation.
When conditions change, so change
the products of heredity. Sophocles
once said, 2.000 years ago, 'War does
not of choice destroy bad men, but
good men ever. The same lesson
lasts through all ages."
Walter M. Snyder and J. Johnson,
laborers of this city, proceeded to cel
ebrate last evening by loading up on
Albtiny booze, which caused them to
wobble considerably while promenad
ing on First street last night and fin
ally resulted in their being arrested by
Polceman Frank McClung and
brought to the city jail where they re
mained over night.
They were arraigned in the munici
pal court this morning where they
plead not guilty and demanded a hear
ing. This was granted them by Police
Judge Van Tassel who after hearing
the evidence sentenced each of them
to pay a line of $10 and costs, which
they refused to do although both
were financially able to do so.
They were given sleeping quarters
in the city bastile, and will donate
their services to the city for the next
five days in improving the appearance
of the streets of Albany.
Hi IS ARRESTED
ft
Local Man Who Had Date With
Girl Approached the Wrong
Party Last Night.
INDIGNANT WOMEN HAVE
MASHER ARRESTED TODAY
Local Man is Fined Twenty
Dollars by Police Judge
for Mistake.
PARIS, ILLINOIS, MAN SELLS OUT
AND IS NOW BOUND FOR ALBANY
The following from the Paris, Illi
nois, Daily News, indicates that Mr.
E. L. Welder of that place will soon
he numbered among the many new
residents of Albany:
"E. L. Wieder has sold his Paris
Ste.im Laundry to an incorporated
stock company of six Paris gentle
men. 1 he change 01 management ami
owncrshin will be comnletted M on-
grown up of j day, Junc 10.
Mr. Wicdcr has been exceedingly
prominent and active in both lodge
and church circles, as weli as public
iftairs in general.
He will close up his business here
and dispose of his property, within
a limited time, and will then remove
with his family to Albany, Ore., where
his brother. Charles H. Wicdef, has
been located for some years."
When G. C. McKinney of this city
accosted Mrs. Margaret Barnes and
Mrs. A. B. Anderson on First street,
in front of the Pullman restaurant,
shortly after 8 o'clock last night he
got himself into a peck of trouble, the
women who became very indignant
over McKinney's action, having him
arrested and brought into court this
morning.
Alter a hearing bv Judge Van Tas
sel he was fined $20 and costs, which
had not been uaia at 3 o'clock this
afternoon and the defendant was in
jail where he will be compelled to
stay 10 days, providing the line is not
paid before that time.
Mrs. Karnes. :he prosecuting wit
ness, testified in court this afternoon
that she and her friend, Mrs. Ander
son, had been to the postotVice and
were going down First street when,
she alleges, Mcliir,iey grabbed her by
the arm.
McKinney testified that he had a
date with a girl whom he had only
st.cn once pclrre :mu was mtsiaixcu
in Mrs. Barnes, whom he thought
was the girl. A:er McKinnie went
down the street after the episode, the
women followed him. and finally
found out whit he was, and had him
arrested today. McKinney denies
that he grabbed either of the women
bv the arm, as they allege.
CUT DOWN EXPENSES
1-2
RAG TIME AND FREAK DANCES
MUST SO, SAV THE MISTERS
Chicago June 11. Oblivion awaits
the "bear cat," the "grizzly bear the
"Texas Tommy," "Boston dip, tur
key trot," and kindred present-day
departures from the stately dance of
30 years ago, declared the Interna
tional Association of Masters of
Dancing, in session here today.
"A limb has been amputated from
the redowa and we call it a waltz,
asserted a Chicago dancing master,
addressing the convention. ' We dis
membered the polka and called it a
two-step. It requires a vivid imagina
tion to portray what we have done to
the beautiful and peaceful dances of
the past to produce Jhe hideous present-day
contortions."
It was decided to begin a campaign
against rag-time music.
MRS. DAVE PARION PASSES AWAY AT
HER HOME AT 4 THIS MORNING
Mrs. D. W. Parton of this city died
of 4 o'clock this morning at her home
on East Sixth street at the age of 30
vr She leaves five children, the
vnnncrst beinir but two days old
Funeral arrangements have not yet
been completed.
A. R. Huber of Brownsville ar
rived in Albany yesterday evening and
is looking after business matters here
thi3 roorrii.g.
Miss Gertrude Young of Oakland, a
popular college student of this city,
returned to her home in Southern
Oregon today where she will spend
the summer. She was accompanied
by Miss Amy Olstcad who will visit
at the Young home a few days before
leaving' for her home at Marshficld.
a
?
PERSONAL MENTION.
Landlord Smith of the Brownsville
hotel, was in the city last evening ac
companied by Airs. Smith.
C. F. Bloom of Salem arrived in
Albany last night and is looking after
business matters here today.
F. R. Bury of Ashland, Ohio, and
V. L. Granger of Ashland. Nebraska,
are two registrations at the St. Fran
cis today.
Charles Mcdin went to Shedds and
Harrisburg this afternoon to look af
ter business matters for M. Ludwig.
the plumber.
Mrs. A. L. Simpson, daughter Mu
riel and son Lowell, went to Dallas
this afternoon for a few days' visit
with relatives and friends.
Roy R. Knox of this city, repre
senting the Albany Mill & Elevator
Company, left this afternoon on a bus
iness trip to Cottage Grove and Rose-
burg.
Mr. and Mrs. F. M. French went to
Portland this afternoon to-attend the
rose festival and visit for a few days
at the home of their daughter, Mrs.
R. W. Williams.
C T.. Downs, a prominent student
of McMinnvillc College, arrived in
Albany this noon with Ulin Douglas,
enroute to his home at Marshficld
where he will spend the summer va
cation.
H. A. Noble, general passenger
ao-ent. and F. W. Graham, immigra
tion agent, both big officials of the
Croat Northern Kv.. arrivcu in ni
bany this noon and were taken out
to Linnhaven this afternoon by Haryr
Hawkins
D. C. Lewis, assistant right-of-way
man for the Oregon Electric, went
to Halsey this afternoon. He repots
all matters of right-of-way between
Alhsnv mH f r.rv.iMn satisfactorily au
justed and also between this city and
Eugene.
Olin Doucdas. son of Rev. and Mrs.
S. A. Douglas, formerly of this city
and now at Ashland, arrived at noon
today from McMinnville where he has
been attending college. He will visit
here for a few days before going to
Ashland.
Rev. Balm of the Good Samaritan
church of Corvallis, passed through
Albany this morning to Portland.
P. A. Stevenson, a prominent rest
dent of Woodburn, was transacting
business in Albany yesterday after
noon.
W. B. Chance, deputy state mill and
labor inspector of this city, went to
Silverton this morning on official
business.
Tnlin Anderson, of Roseburg,
looking after business matters in Al
bany today, having come up from that
city last evening.
Fred Weatherford, a brother of
Mark V. Weatherford of this city,
who has been visiting relatives here
ihr nasi few davs. returned this morn
ing to his home in Olox. eastern Ore
MAN SIXTY YEARS OF A6E
TRIES THE SUICIDE ROUTE
We will even do btter than that for you by allowing you to
even save more than half on some of the suits offered in this sale
SALE STARTS WEDNESDAY
Every garment is made of
first-class material through
out, correctly tailored, and
absolutely the latest styles.
All are this spring's stock
and are
OUR BEST SELECTED SUITS
Whipcords, Two-tone Diag
onals, Home Spuns, Men's
Suiting, Blue Serges, sepa
rated into two lots.
Lot A comprises the best
tha,t goes to make up an ab
solutely high-class Suit.
Regular prices $45.00, $43,00,
$42.00, $39.00, $36.00, $35.00,
$33.00, $32.00, $31.00.
SALE PRICE $21.50
Lot P is composed of high
grade Suits, carefully hand
: tailored, first-class material,
same as Lot A with the ex
ception that the material is
not so expensive. Regular
prices $27.50. $27.00, $25.50,
$25.00, $23.00, $21.50.
SALE PRICE $13.50
An early visit means a
greater selection from which
to choose.
Timely Arrival of His Nephew
Saves Neck. Found Him
at Home of Nephew.
Lebanon. Ore.. June 12. The time
ly arrival of his uncle, saved the life
.Marion M alone, who attempted 10
hang himself at the home of his neph
ew, Farmer Malonc, of Sweet Home,
on Saturday.
Farmer Malonc and family had come
to the strawberry fair in Lebanon and
returned home at about 8 o'clock, and
in going into the house were sur
prised to find their uncle hanging by
the neck. They at once gave the
:il:irm and a crowd soon gathered and
upon examination found the old man
still alive, lie was at once cut down
and was soon restored to normal con
dition.
-Mr. Malone is about 60 years old
and has been committed to the asylum
once, but was turned out as cured.
H has recently had trouble with his
wife, who secured a divorce from him,
and this is thought to have some
thing to do with his action.
;! . r
; ! J
I A-ii'.'liiiin,! W ;,
I The Big Store
1
I
!
Established 1866
Our reputation for totally
different and better suits
husulrcndy been established
FACULTY GAVE LUNCHEON AT
NOON TODAY FOR 6QV. WEST
WHIRLWIND THE BEST SCHOOL
PUBLICATION IN THE STATE
"The neatest ai.d best edited school
publication in the state." is the verdict
of those who have seen the annual
edition of the A. H. S. Whirlwind,
which is now being distributed among
patrons of the Albany public schools.
Not only is the publication well
edited, but the illustrations are par
ticularly fine. The Whirlwind con
tains cuts of the various members of
the local school board, members of
the faculty and of the student body. .
I he editorial staff consists of Chas.
Ohling, managing editor; Ruth
Thompson, editor-in-chief; Floyd
South, athletic editor; Helen Hul-
bert, society editor; Kate Watrous,
exchange editor with Crowcll, Cow
an. Conn and Fish as class editors.
Carson Bigbee is the advertising man
ager, and Madeline Rawlings sub
scription manager.
To Chas. Ohling and Ruth Thomp
son, assisted by an able corps of ed
itors in the various departments, is
due the credit of publishing the best
High School Annual in the state.
.J. Humfield, of West Stayton, one
of the progressive sections of eastern
Marion county, is in Albany today on
a short business trip.
Mrs. Will Koch of this city went
to Portland this morning where she
will visit friends for a few days and
attend the rose festival.
Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Moorehouse of
Salem were visiting friends in Albany
yesterday afternoon, while here stop
ping at the Van Dran hotel.
President Crooks and Other Men
of Albany Dine at the St.
Francis Hotel.
Governor Oswald West was the
guest of honor at ?A luncheon ten
dered him by President Crooks and
the members of the faculty at the Ho
tel St. Francis at noon today.
After the luncheon, the, chief ex
ecutive was hurried to the depot
where he took the afternoon train to
the Capital City, where several im
portant matters await his action at
the capital building.
Those who dined today with Gov
ernor West were: President Harry
Means Crooks, Dr. F. 11. Gesclbracht,
Samuel E. Young Colonel M. H.
Ellis, Dr. W. P. White. Alfred C.
Schmitt, J. C. Irvine, Carlton E. Sox,
Prof. F. G. Franklin, Prof. Flo, Prof.
O. V. White, William Fortmillcr and
V. P. Nutting of Albany and Dr.
Parsons of Eugene.
Si
COURT HOUSE NOTES.
Warranty Deeds.
S. Gus Colins and wife to Dicie
Mower. May 2.1, 1912. Lands in
Sec. 2.1. Tp. 11, S. K.. 2 W., 49.98
acres. Sll).
W. A. Messncr et us to A. P. Talent
ct al. April 2, 1912. 5.1 acres in Tp.
13, S. R. 3 West. $4,51X1.00.
Dicie Howcr and husband to S.
Gus Collins. May 23, 1912. Lands in
Wm. Kalston's Addition to Lebanon.
also Rivcrdale Addition. $1(MK).
James R. Shaw and wife to The
Shaw Company. June 8th. 1912. 40
acres in Shaw's Addition to Mill City
iu.uu.
James R. Shaw and wife to The
Shaw Company. June 6th, 1912. Lots
in bhaw s 1st Addition to Mill City
$10.(X).
Advertised Letters.
Willie Biggs, R. K. Benson. Mrs.
- nnuii 1 1 iii'iiiii.ii, m in" inii'iji .
gon. stopping at Portland to see the H;)mjll, Mr, CoM Hcdrick, Sa
rose festival Mr. Weatherford is a . on Mr, j ,.; j,,n5,jn 2),
student at the Oregon Agricultural ; I)r . mM c .chn1;ini Miss F.rtna
College, prominent in all student ac- , au A M.Ginjs (2). Rbcrt Willis,
tivities, and ranking captain oi me
cadet regiment.
Miss Nellie Wirkland
J. S. VAN WINKLE, P. M.
THE EIGHTH 6BADE GRADUATES
HAVE RECEIVED THEIR DIPLOMAS
The following is a list of the 8th
grade graduates of Linn county:
Willard McCullouuh. Ilcldon Kauff-
man, Marian Huchdanncr, Gladys
Hathaway, Elsie Mattke, Carl Rus
sell, Mack McClure, George Myers,
Frank Krunl. Ruth Hocking, Ethel
Sprenger, Velma Stone, Leola Mc
Cormick.' Cvrus Arnold. Nina Propst,
Amy Parsons, Harvey Burnett, Engra
Benson, Eflie Benson, Florence Bog
gy, George Chandler, George Temple
ton. Delpha Green. Alice Cowling,
Laverne Mickalson, I la Woln, Gladys
Rogers. Rosa Kotan. Emma Kotan
Lola Compton, Harold Kizcr, Nettie
Williams, Neva Waugh, Thomas Stu
art, Mary Brown, Max Mueller, Ag
nes Mehring, Ethel Tharpe, Floyd
Jcnks, Lorcn Davis, Elton Gildow,
Chas. Fortmillcr, Naomi Bodinc. Flo
ra Forcrv. Hazel Cwoan. Lyndon My
ers, Arthur McChcsncy, Clay Cornell,
Paul Dawson. Glenn Mien, neien
Johnston, Fay Miller. Van Bailey,
Ralph Willoiighby. Vernila Dinwid
die. Verne Dinwiddie, Graeme Goblr,
hr Kniiths. Lewis Dougherty
Vivian King. Jcry Coyle, Raymond
Leonard. Beldon Arthurs, Milton
Howe. Verne Watson, Byron Thomp
n Milton Cox. Edith Walker, l los
sic Mvers. Allie Fitrgcrald, Mary
rr.niutt. Ruth Kacklcv. Ilda Love
t,.ie Mackev. Ruth Tillotson, Karl
Aycrs. Beatrice Newport, Eva God
frey. Walter Mills, Roberta Hay,
Venna Devine, Eva Mmtzc. Byron
Curl. Ruth Wight, Ina Pierce, New
ton Estcs, George Harden, Ruben
Lee, Marie Stuart.
Andrew G. Policy and wife to Al
bert Hutchinson. May ISlh, I"I2.
Lands in Tp. 15, S. K.-4 VV Linn
county. ?HUH).
Quit-Claim Deeds.
C. E. Maxson and wife to Andrew
S. Policy. May 15th. 1912. Lands in
Claim 4(1, Tp. 15, 5. R. 4 W. lu
acres. $1.00.
Marriage Licenses.
C. E. Smith, age 32 years, and Oro
R. Abel, age 17 years, both born ill
Oregon.
Archie J. Archart, age 2n years,
born in Oregon, and Eftie L. McClaiu,
age 22 years, born in Nebraska.
THE WEATHER
Occasional rain tonight and Thurs
day. River 3.9. Rainfall 75. Tem
perature 55-66.
Our Methods
Save You Money
We sell pure goods at prices
as low as consistent with fair
dealing and honest profits
NO DECEPTIVE BAITS USED
Full-weight, Full-count, Full-measure Always
We carry the best selected stock of
GROCERIES, FRESH and SALTED
MEATS, LARD and SAUSAGES
in the city.
THE DRESSED BEEF
& PRODUCE CO.
110 LYON STREET