Central Point American. (Central Point, Or.) 1925-1927, November 05, 1926, Image 1

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    IN T H E L A N D
‘WHERE THE.
^OGUE RIVER FLOWS
CENTRAL POINT
TH E CENTRAL
POINT OF ¡B U S Y
JACKSON COUNTY
M
A merican !
Ort P a cific Higk>v«LY A S P R a ilr o a d
L U M B E R IN G -F R U IT - D A U 2 ,V IN G — M I N I N G - F A R M I N G - S T O C K RAISING-FISHING-HUNTING
VOLUME 2
• !
I
CENTRAL
P O IN T .
JACKSON.
COUNTY. OREGON.
*
N O V E M B E R S , 1926
Copco Never Fails In Good
SMALL TOWNS
W ord For the Rogue Land ATTRACT PEOPLE
The Rogue River Valley is given
some fine publicity in the October
Volt,recently distributed by the Cal­
ifornia Oregon Power Company. The
article in which this publicity appears
is entitled ‘Three Rivers,’ and giwes
an interesting account o f the Rogue,
the Umpqua, and the Klamath, all of
which are utilized by the Copco con­
cern for the development o f hydro­
electricity, and all of which are very
important factors in the productivity
and progress o f this favored territory
The Rogue River (the main stream
o f it) rises in volcanic country on the
west slope o f the mountains sur­
rounding Crater Lake, at an elevat-
iop of 6240 feet above sea level. The
water feeding it at its source comes
from springs possibly supplied from
Crater Lake. This river takes its
course westerly and discharges into
the ocean near Gold Beach, Oregon.
Its total length is about 175 miles.
The elevations within its drainage
basin above Prospect, where ourgen-
erating plant o f the same name is
located, range from 2500 to 9760
feet, the highest elevation being Mt.
McLaughlin. The drainage area above
Gold Ray, where one of the Com­
pany’s power plants is located, con­
tains 2020 square miles. Here, too,
as in the drainage basin o f the Kla­
math, the rocks are volcanic, and the
area is almost completely covered
With timber. Gold Ray is about 35
miles below Prospect.
These three rivers, the Klamath,
Rogue and Umpqua, and their trib­
utaries, make this a wonderfully well
watered land, and power, developed
and potential, make it one of the
most favored regions in North
America for a man to put forth ef­
fort and realize on results.
Some eccelent pictures of the
Rogue, one taken near Prospect, one
o f the Rock Point Bridge, and one
showing the river below Grants Pass,
show up prominently in ths attractive
double-page spread f photographs
which illustrate the article. Other
photos present some interesting views
o f the Copco power plants on tiie
Klamath River, and a good picture
o f the South Umpqua with the city
o f R seburg in the foreground.
Another item o f interest in this
issue has to do with the general pros­
perity o f this territory and shows
how popular Copco securities are
with the people who reside here. The
article which appears a» a substory
is quoted herewith as follows -
Over 5000 shares o f this Com­
pany’s Six Per Cent Prefferred Cap­
ital Stock has been taken up by in­
vestors since May 22, 1926, and of
that amount over4300 shares were
purchased by residents o f the Copco
field o f service. During September
3088 shares were sold.
Copco has
some 3000 shareholders; more than
2200 o f them reside in the territory
served
At the present price o f $95 these
shares yield 6.31 per cent to the in­
vestor. This stock is non-assessable
by the company for any purpose
whatever, and is non-callable. The
dividends are exempt from normal
income tax.
Dividends are comulative and are
payable on January 30, July 30 and
October 30 o f each year.
On November 16, Copco 6 per
cent P referred advances to $96 per
share. This stock may be purchased
either for caah* or on a convenient
monthly investment plan. You can
start with as little as $5 per month.
Full detaiL will be found in the
C E N T R A L P O I N T G I R L W IN -
N ER O F E S S A Y C O N T E S T
Mary Stanley of the Central Point
high school won the first prize i
the Jacksonville anti-county seat re­
moval prize contest.
Miss Stanley
will receive ten dollars in cash.
Thesecond prize of $7.50 went to
Marie Gwin o f the Jacksonville high
school, third prize o f $5 to Harlan
Cantral of Ruch, and fourth prize of
$2.50 io George Manke, Medford, R.
F. D. 1.
The following fifth prize winners
each receiving a $1 prize, were also
announced:
Dorothy Blaylock, Medford; Ed­
ward Stanley, Central Point; and the
following all o f Jacksonville: George
Walter, Vivian Miller, Staney Grimes
Ingrid Johnson, Louise Weiss, Carl
Larson, Edgar Weiss and Robert
Grimes.
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H A S FRE SH S T R A W B E R R I E S
Berries A re G row n in Central Point
Prove Delicious.
Fresh strawberries the first «Jay of
November from a local garden here
would seem to some a myth, but to us
it was a real treat Tuesday after­
noon When J. B. Stevens brought us
in a nice big box full o f the luscious
fruit that he had picked a few min­
utes earlier. Mr. Stevens has on his
vines some berries almost ripe while
there are a large number that are
still green. The vines have been only
slightly touched in places by the
frost but in other parts o f the garden
it still resembles July. The plot is
planted in Progressive and Mostibon
plants.
---------- + ----------
It’ s all over, now let’s get down to
business.
1. L. P A T T E R S O N
POI NT
W in ner s o f This Contest fo r Removal
are Annou nced.
B E C O M IN G
Suburb Is Movement
pressure is bringing about among the
well-to-do a country-mindedness that
Is resulting in the growth of large
country estates.
Relief Corp s Party
The Halloween party given by the
Relief Corps last Friday night, the
29th was enjoyed by a good crowd.
Ashort program was enjoyed by all.
The last day o f school especially,the
K eep Baaemer.t Sanitary
A very important feature about a teacher Mrs. Dr. Heckman was given
home Is a dry and sanitary basement. much credit. Our president, Mre.
In some localities, due to the nature Gleason looked very becoming in her
o f the soli and general topography of gypsy fortune telling garb.
the l^i, there Is considerable surface
Refreshments were served a t . 10
water. If the walls of the basement, o’clock, every one having a good
which Is the foundation, ore not prop­
time departed for home at 11 o'clock.
erly constructed some of this water
will find Its way into voor basement,
FREDERICK ST E IW E R
or If not actually seeping through will
cause It to be permanently damp,
which Is a very Insanitary condition.
To obviate this condition some form
of waterproofing Is used. This Is usu
ally mixed In the material nsed In the
outer coat of the foundation walls and
on the under side of the basement
floor, or may be a separate material
used as a backing. In either case such
application should keep the basement
wails free from all moisture under all
conditions.
Tree» for Comfort
How priceless are the spreading
branches of the great elm tree In the
backyard, or the falryllke whispering
silver birch. How much they would
be rolaaed If something should happen
to them. They are beyond price, for
mere money cannot replace them—It
takes years and yean cf summer suns
and winter resting. In the span of a
lifetime a fine old tree cannot he re-
placed, so It behooves one to cherish
Newly elected governor o f Oregon them and protect them In every way
by handsome majority.
Governor possible. If something destroy* a tree
Patterson will make Oregon’s best on one's premise* one should put out
another—It will not mature for the
governor.
oik who sets It. but somebody will
some day bless him for hla thoughtful­
C O U N T Y S E A T TO BE
M O V E D T O M E D F O R D ness and he will have made the world
a more comfortable place by the deed
Wednesday’s report from all the
votes counted and tabulated by the
Watch for Needed Repair»
Mail-Tribune assures the county seat
It Is a wise precaution, and often
a money-saving job a* well, to have
removal by a big majority.
For removal
..... - ............. 3227 a roofing man carefully go over the
Against removal
1987 roof In rase It la not o f permanent
Majority in favor 1240, or over 60 material and see that no repairs are
oeressary In It or In the flashing or
per cent.
gutters. Oftentimes the heat of the
This makes victory for Medford summer has warped parts of the roof
certain and city and county officials In such a way that the rain will seep
were busy today going over plans In when storms come
Slops or walk* that need repairing
for preliminary steps toward the
construction o f a new city hall and or replacing can tie fixed much easier
transfer of the courthouse records, Bow than after the bad weather nets
In. They will be needed then, an It la
booklet which will be mailed to yon pending the erection o f a new court­
beat to sea that they art in good coo
house in that city.
on request.
Ì
TO MOVE COUNTY SEAT
In the essay contest conducted by
the Court House Removal commit­
tee for the best essay on the saving
R ESID EN T CITY OF
to the taxpayers o f Jackson county
by the removal o f the county seat to
JACKSON
Medford, there were a large number
o f replies and the winners were as
follows:
First Prize— Robert Humphrey,
A clean Resident Tow n Make» For Central Point.
Second Prize— Evelyn E. Charley,
Health and Happiness the
Climax.
W o rld Over.
Third Prize— Rebecca Jean Rose,
Phoenix.
Fourth Prizes: Dorothy H. Blay­
Small Town Attracta
lock, Medford; Edith Sage, Central
Reaid enta o f Citiea Point; Margaret Osenbrugge, Med­
The strong suburban movement of ford; Catherine Hayes, Medford;
the last ten years Is recognized as a Jessie Nenthammer, Rogue River.
-------- * --------
tendency that is transformiiig Amer­
ican cities. With «Mils movement we
F IF T H G R A D E N E W S
are now beginning to observe various
Byrd Grigsby will shine shoes at
subsidiary tendencies that are conv Gleason's barber shop^ every night,
binlng with the suburban spread, and
better get a shine.
that may be in effect a considerable
Lloyd Whiteside and Paul Morton
compensation for forces In our na­
tional life that tend constantly to con­ are Coming to school Monday.
Rupert and Clifford Shaw are lea­
centrate our populatlou In city cen­
ters.
ving us Thursday, for Stayton. We
The sweep of homeseekers toward are sorry to see them go, and wish
the roomier sections outlying cities them success n their new school.
Is not only building up the purely resi­ Rupert Stayed with Joe last Tuesday
dential suburhan home section. It Is.
night, they report a splendid time.
around every large city, giving rise
Misses Mathews and .Blackburn
to a new type of living, in which
dountry-mlnded city workers are ven­ visited Miss Matthew's parents at
turing out Into one-acre or live-acre Gold Hill last Tuesday evening.
tracts which the family may develop
Fifth grade parents be sure to
as commuter furn-eg» — “ rubber-tired come to the P. T. A. Friday afternoon
farmers,” the ('alitTirulans dub them. and help us get the Gold Fish.
At the same time u not dissimilar Im­
---------- + ----------
pulse for occasional escape from city
CENTRAL
> V
FRIDAY.
Elected U. S. Senator. Best race
ever run, in considering a three
cornered fight with the winner a
total stranger to most o f the voter*.
Steiwer is a big fnan in every way.
Alaska C ou ple Here.
Mr. and Mrs. Emery F. Tobin
viaited at the E. C. Faber home last
week. Mrs. Tobin is a cousin of Mrs.
Faber. Mr. and Mr a. Tobin are from
Ketchikan, Alaaka, where he ia
assistant superintendent o f the New
England Fisheries Co., and Mrs. To­
bin formerly taught school 300 miles
inland from Ketchikan. The couple
were on their honeymoon trip, being
recently married and left thia week
for their northern journey. In speak­
ing o f the immense fish business of
hia company, Mr. Tobin stated that
fifteen million pounds o f frozen flab
are shipped annually to Chicago,
New York and Boston.
N U M B E R 29
CENTRAL POINT
CASTS VOTES
H A S S L I G H T T E N D E N C Y T O GO
DEM OCRATIC
Over 400 Cast Vote
All State Measures D e fe ate d
Here;
City O fficia ls R e-Ele cted to
Serve M ore Terms.
Central Point voted in two pre­
cincts and the precincts, including
city officials, brought out over 400
voters.
All o f the state measures were de­
feated in Central Point with the ex­
ception of the Eastern Oregon Tuber­
culosis hospital bill which carried
twoto one, and the Fish Wheel bill
which curried by a very fine ma­
jority. The rest o f the measures were
badly snowed under.
For U. S. Senator in Central
Point, Adams secured two little
votes, Haney, 113; Stanfield, 85;
Steiwer, 140.
Representative in Congress, Bord­
en, 167; Hawley, 176.
For governor, Patterson, 147;
Pierce, 202; Stallard, 13.
For county commissioner: Geo. Al­
ford got 166; Anderson, 168;.
County Seat removal: For the re­
moval, 164; against removal, 188.
City Ticket.
The city ticket was a “ walk
away’’ foe the present administra­
tion.
For mayor: W. C. Leever, 179; J.
E. Weaver, 1. Leever was the only
name appearing on the ballot
For reci>rd*r: L. Hatfield, 179; S.
S. Poague, 21 .
Treasurers F. A. Paxson, 183.
Councilman S o u t h w e l l , 173;
Scott, 176; Moss, 186; Lewis, 176;
Kindle, 17S, Whiteside, 176.
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MASQUARADE
PARTY GIVEN
The masquarade which was given
by the Freshman class, Friday the 29
proved to be an enjoyable evening
to those attending.
Doyle Mills, chairman of the pro­
gram committee, led the visitors in
the following games: Spin the pan,
Two Deep, and a musical game.
As
in all high school affairs the difficul­
ty o f getting the crowd together was
experienced, but this is to expected
when about eighty active young
people are together.
The decoration commit tee in spite
o f the fact o f time and material had
created a Halloween atmosphere by
decorating in orange and black, and
field corn.
Supper partners were selected by
distributing among the students pic­
tures o f ladies which had formally
been cut in two parts, consequently
a mad scrahle was made in searching
for the missing parts, thus finding
their pardner.
The refreshments which followed
thia carried out the Hallowe’en
idea in big red apples, pumpkin pie,
and generous cups o f cider
All types o f customes were to be
seen.
Perry Johnson, who was
dressed as a girl proved to be a
great source o f puxzlement to some
and merriment to those that knew
who he was.
Mr. Jewett, who
wore hla usual clothing and a
simple looking mask with buldging
eye* proved to he a puzzle to three
inquisitive Senior* who thought he
' was a Freshman hoy, but after a clo­
ser examination to their chagrin saw
their mistake. In general the cost­
umes were made o f Holloween col­
ors Orange and Black.