Eagle Valley news. (Richland, Or.) 191?-1919, October 01, 1914, Image 6

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    -i"-Hrif-"
AMERICAN
American residents of Paris, who
seen In tho Placo de l'Opera en routo
VILLA DECLARES
WAR ON MEXICO
Sonora and Chihuahua States
Again in Revolt
First Chief Orders Railway Closed
as Precautionary 3Teasrue
Rebels Get Munitions.
El Paso, Texas General Francisco
Villa, dominant leader
ln JNorthern
Mexico, has denounced the central
nnnti-ol
government headed by Venustiano Car
ranza and announced his independence
in a statement sent to the Associated
Press.
This placed the state of Chihuahua
in .open revolt against the party in
power at Mexico City as well as
Sonora, the next border state to the
west, where Governor May torena pre
viously has proclaimed his independ
ence of the constitutionalist party as
as I
reprcenteqbyCarrari7.n..iii. om,i .'w
""-"'"Villa a"gents sent several carloads
munitions as well as troons to assist
Governor Maytorena, of Sonora, who
is in open revolt against Carranza.
This was followed later, according to J
reports received here, by the sending
of 500,000 pesos in Villa paper cur
rency to Maytorena officials.
This money, it was said, was being
placed in circulation in that part of
Sonora domniated by the Maytorena
forces to absorb the constitutionalist
or Carranza issue.
General Obregon, one of the Carran
za adherents, who heads the North
western military zone of which Sonora
is a part, remained at Chihuahua City,
said persons arriving from the South.
He was reported last week to have
been arrested by Villa.
Telegrams received here several
days ago signed with Obregon's name
said that he was returning at once to
the national capital. It was declared
officially that Obregon was held a pris
oner at Villa's house in Chihuahua.
WORLD-WIDE MISERY IS
CAUSED BY EUROPEAN WAR
New York Commerce in every spot
in the world has been seriously affect
ed by the European war, say belated
reports from missions established
throughout the world by the Persby
terian church.
West Africa is facing a critical sit
uation; Syria is in utter hopelessness;
Persia is chaotic, especially in finan
cial circles; missionaries in India are
unable to receive outside financial aid;
Chilean industry is prostrated and the
country is in a pitiable plight; the
poor in Guatemala have been driven by
hunger to confiscate the food stores of
the wealthy. Such are tho sombre
pictures of some of the mission fields
revealed by Dr. A. W. Halsey, secre
tary of the Presbyterian board of fore
ign missions,
Epidemic of Cholera Dis
covered Among Austrians
Venice Nine cases of Asiatic chol
era have -been discovered among the
wounded soldiers in Hungary, accord
ing to an official announcement by the
Following a complaint entered with
United States District Attorney
Jtmw by Thomas Erskino, British
eonul at Portland, the Department of
Agriculture instructed the forest offi
cers in Southern Oregon to ascertain,
if peeelble, the location of the power
ful wlreliNM telegraph plant that In
preMirmHj to b operating in the wood
t Jtewthern Oregon In the Interest of
tint German government.
VOLUNTEERS FOR FRENCH ARMY
havo organized a volunteer regiment to
to their drilling placo and carrying tho
j Hungarian minister of tho interior. I
The announcement has excited great !
; apprehension throughout the dual mon- (
' archy.
It is learned here that tho first sus
i pected cose of cholera in Hungary was
j that of a wounded soldier, who was
J brought, on September 15, to Bckesc-
saba from the ualician battlefield. I he
bacteriological examination clearly
showed Asiatic cholera.
The patient was immediately iso
lated. Sinco then eight other cases
havo been discovered, also among tho
wounded who returned from Galicia.
One case was found at Munkacs, an
other at Tokad (Tokay) and six at
Dumaszerdahelv. in Pressbere. imme-
! diately on the Austrian border, within
I an hour's ride of Vienna.
. , .. f n.
,ely. news oi ine progress ui iuo ngm-
mg against the Russians and Servians.
German Submarines Sink
rf r y-T i r. niii. ?
inree angusn tsamesmpsx
London The British cruisers Abou-
kir, Hogue and Cressy, of identical
tonnage and armament, wero sunk at
m. .... iivutKaua v. buu iiui ku
Sea. by five German submarinee, ac
Mlr'tonolnciaV
announcement?
1 nt i it. . i i - i i i .
' r irst me aoouKir was lorpcuoeu: as
J tho other vessels drew in to rescue the
rcrew, they in turn were sunk.
This was the severest loss the Brit
ish navy has suffered during the war.
British cruisers and torpedo boats
came quickly to the assistance of the
doomed vessels, and it is reported sank
two of the German submarines, while
threo others escaped.
The three crusiers carried more than
2000 men, but no estimate has yet
been made of the number of saved or
lost. The fate of the cruiser Pathfind
er, sunk recently in the North Sea by
a torpedo, proved how quickly a ship
may be sent to the bottom by an under
water attack and it is therefore be
lieved that the loss of life is bound to
be heavy.
The steamer Flores took 287 survi
vors of the sunken ships into the Dutch
port of Ymuiden. The steamer Titan
picked up 114 men, one of whem after
ward died. Twenty of the wounded
were kept on board the vessel, while
the others of the wounded were trans
ferred to British men-of-war. The
Lowestoft, another British craft, res
cued a good number.
The German policy of keeping the
German battle fleet in harbor and at
tempting to pick of! British ships one
by one thus far has resulted in tho loss
of three 12, 000-ton cruisers, the Path
finder of 3000 tons and two small craft
destroyed by mines.
German Wireless Station
Sought in Southern Oregon
. Washington, D. C. On complaint of
the British embassy,, the Department
of Agriculture has begun a search for
a mysterious wireless plant supposed
to be operating in the mountains on
the Pacific Coast. Information fur
nished to the department is vague, but
apparently the plant, Is busily engaged
in sendnig messages uncensored by tho
Federal goverment. Forest rangers
who patrol the mountains are under
stood to havo received orders to look
for the wireless outfit.
Queen Visits Refugees.
London Queen Mary, accompanied
by the Belgian minister to Great Brit
ain and several of her ladles, visited
the Belgian refugees In Alexandra pal
ace. Her majesty was much interest
ed In these unfortunate people and
gave expression to tier sympathy, As
she entered Ute dining hall, where h
nw batch of refugee hud Just arrived,
she wmk greeted by a wild outburst of
cheering.
fight in tho French army, are here
Stars and Strlpos.
ORDER WIRELESS
STATION CLOSED
Navy Acts Regardless of Liti
gation as to Rights.
Contention Is That President Has
Full Authority to Enforce
Strict Neutrality.
Washington, D. C. By order of
President Wilson and with tho assis
tance of the army and navy, tho wiro
less station of tho Marconi company at
Siasconset, Mass., was closed Saturday
because it declined to recognizo the
right of the Federal government to ox-
ercise a censorship over the plant.
Tho Navy department took no cog
nizance of the fact that the Marconi L
company had filed in a Federal court
an jappUcmtlonf oran njuneUon ,,to re
strain the naval officers from closing
or censoring the Btation. The wireless
company finally decided to offer no re
sistance and the station was closed nt
1 p. m.
Tho Navy department made public
the telegrams that had passed between
the department and Ensign E. B. Nix
on, U. S. N., in chargo at tho Siascon
set station. Tho statement follows:
"At 1 :23 p. m. tho Navy department
received the following message from
Ensign Nixon, government inspector
at the Siasconset station:
" 'Siasconsent, Mass., Sept 26, 1914
The following letter was received
when your instructions were delivered
to the Marconi man in charge of this
station:
i acknowledge receipt or your
lctterof instructions relative to tho
cessation of all radio communications
at Siasconset, Mass., and would ask if
you are prepared to carry out your or
ders by force.
" ' "Marconi Wireless Telegraph
Company or America."
" 'I request instructions.
" 'E. C. NIXON.'
"At 2:17 p.m. the department re
ceived the following:
" 'Siasconset, Mass., Sept. 2C Sea
retary of the Navy, Washington, D.
C. The Marconi company withdraws
letter previously sent and the station
was closed at 1 p. m. E. B. NIXON.
Portland Airman Missing.
Los Angeles Search was instituted
lato Saturday night at Coast points
near hero for trace of Silas Christoffer
son, Portland avitator; C. Frenah,
mechanician, and Lieutenant Morrow,
of the government aviation school at
San Diego, who attempted a flight in
an aeroplane from San Diego to Los
Angeles. The aeroplane was last
sighted during the afternoon flying
over the water near Newport Beach.
Tho machine was not equipped with
pontoons.
Bishop Spalding Killed.
Salt Lake City Bishop F. S. Spald
ing, head of the Episcopal church in
Utah, was instantly killed here Satur
day when an automobile In which ho
was riding struck a curb and over
turned. Bishop Bpalding'a skull was
badly fractured and his neck broken.
Tho car wa driven by a young daugh
ter of Judge William If. King, who is
one of the btknown Democratic
politicians in live Weet nnd exrepre
Ncntutlvo In congrew from this din-'
trlct,
Hoarding Cash by Hank
Denounced by McAdoo
Washington, D. C Socrctnry Mc
Adoo hhR adopted stringent measures
to urgo National bunks to extend legit
imate credit and chnrgo normal inter
est rates on loans. Ho telegraphed to
tun National bunkn in tho four reserve
cities in tho South that tholr requoata
for additional crop-moving fum!n from
tho Federal govormont would not bo
granted at this time, anil rnado It clear
that his action was taken in connection
with reports of excessive interest rates
and restriction of credits.
In a statement made publio with tho
telegram Mr. McAdoo declared that
thoro was an extraordinary hoarding
of monoy by banks throughout tho
country and piling up of reserves with
out occasion. Ho said rcporta to tho
controller of tho currency showed that
money-hoarding had been carried on by
banks to an extreme degree, and an
nounccd that ho expected to focus at
tention on tho guilty banks by issuing
a dally list of tlioso with excessive re
serves.
Although tho Federal government
has no power over state banks or trust
companies, tho secretary explained
that state superintendents would bo
naked to furnish avallablo information
on money-hoarding In such institutions
Ho characterized monoy-hoarding by
banks as tho agency most likely to Im
pair confidence and injure business.
London Watches Sky for
Attacks by Air Craft
London England fa becoming more
and more apprehensive about German
aeroplanes and Zoppclinn. Prepara
tions havo been rnado in tho English
capital against such an attack.
It Is gcnorally conceded that Zeppe
lins could hardly mako a trip over ns
well defended a country as London in
tho Unytimo becnuso of tho guns on
high buildings. At night tho flight of
a Zcppolin over London would bo com
paratively safe.
For wookB lights about Buckingham
Palace have not bcon lighted and with
in the last few days only about one
third of the London street lights havo
been turned on. Stores, theaters, ho
tels and other public places havo been
asked through tho nowspapcrs to re
duce their lights to the minimum that
London may not oiTor a bright glow
for tho guidanco of aorinl navigators.
Masonic Sign Said to Have
, Saved SO from Execution
Ostend The power of Freemasonry
is illustrated by a story told hero by
citizen of Louvain, who, with tho Ma
sonic sign, says he saved CO of his fc
low citizens from being shot to dcat
by German troops.
This group of citizens, according to
the recital of the Belgian Mason, had
been lined up for execution. Tho Gcr
man firing party had aimed their rifles
when tho narrator gave a Masonic
sign. Tho German officer commanding
the firing squad happened to bolong to
tho craft. Ho recognized a brother
Mason and ordered tho Louvuin Free
mason to lenvo tho ranks. This meant
sparing his life.
Tho Louvain citizen, howover, re
fused, saying: "My follow citizens
are no more guilty than I am. If you
aro going to kill them, I Bhall bo killed
with them."
The German officer then ordered the
release of tho entire party.
Red Cross Society Said to
Be Swamped by Wounded
New York Tho number of those
wounded in battle in Europo is already
in the hundreds of thousands. The
hospitals and churches of. Paris and
Berlin and cottages on tho battlefield
aro filled, and many other wounded lie
exposed in trenches, according to Ern
est P. Bicknell, national director of
tho American Red Cross, who arrived
hero on tho steamship Olympic, from
Liverpool. Mr. Bicknell, who left
New York on tho battleship Tonnes
see, tho American vessel which carried
gold to Americans in need in Europe.
spent several weeks observing condi
tions in tho countries at war.
"Tho truth is," Mr. Bicknell Baid.
"inat over tno thousands of square
miles already battle-swept there have
been loft almost countless thousands of
men helpless from ghastly wounds.
Some havo been gathered into trains
by tho Red Cross surgeons and nurses
and taken to hospitals In tho larger
cities.
"Let no man imagine the American
ted Cross can do too much or enough.
Nurses and surgeons aro needed more
and more, and also medical and hospi
tal supplies."
Cathedral Ordered Spared.
Now York Count Von Uernstorff!
tho Gorman ambassador to tho United
States, recolved tho following wIm1h
dispatch from the German office at
iorlln; "Tho German Wornmcnt
states officially, In contradiction of tho
ihvih Agency report that tho. German
nrtlllery purpoeJy destroyed Important
buildings In Itholrris, that orders wero
given to tfjrnro tho cathedral by all
means,
NEWS NOTES OF
CURRENT WEEK
Rcsumo of World's Important
Events Told in Brief.
Tho hospital ship Hunt from New
York hnn reached England.
Rebels In Moxlco havo destroyed
many miles "of rallronda west of Vern
Cruz,
Official confirmation hiiH reached
London of tho appearance of cholera in
tho Austrian army.
A Gorman prisoner who escaped wih
rocaptured after living for 20 days on
raisins and raw snails.
British war offico admits tho sinking
of threo of her warahlpti In tho North
Sea by German submarines.
A hodcarrlor on n San Francisco
skyscraper slid 13 stories down a rope,
burning out tho palms of both hands.
Vessels from tho Dalmatian coast
roport that tho bombardment of Cat
(aro by French ships and land forces
ha begun.
A British detachment numbering
800 South Wales border men and 400
Indian Sikhs were landed near Lao
flhan, China.
Bccauao reportcrawcro required to
enter tho back door of the official
press bureau in London, the war writ
ers havo gone on strike.
People In VIonna'nro rioting bccminu
of tho government withholding the
war nows. Several persons have bcon
killed and many arrests made.
An Amsterdam dispatch says tho
Berlin VorwacrtB was suspended for
three days for saying that the German
advanco was In reality a retreat.
AnothcrfGrlmBby trawler was blown
up by n mlno in tho North Sen. Tho
crew all escaped oxcept one deckhand,
who was killed by fnlllng debris.
Tho European xvar hos not affected
tho date of opening tho Panama Pa
cific exposition. No nations have
withdrawn their Intentions to partici
pate Berlin army headquarters admits
that one mortar shot was fired against
th, cathedral of Uhelrnn, aa otherwise
it would Iihvu teon Impossible to drive
away tho enemy's observation posta
there.
Russian troops occupying Senlawa,.
18 miles northwest of Jaroslau, says n
Petrograd dispatch, found that tho
town had been sacked by Austrians.
A largo number of Austrian soldiers
wero captured.
Tho correspondent r"of the Italian
newspaper Corrlcro Delia Zerra "at
Trieste soya that two Austrinn torpedo
Itoals and one destroyer were sunk by
floating- mines lost Friday on tho coasL
of Dalmatia,
A South Shields dispatch to the Cen
tral Nowa of London says that tho
Norwegian steamer Hcsvik has been
destroyed by striking a mine in the
North Sea. Tho chief engineer and
ono asalstant were killed.
A Pretoria dispatch to tho Router
Telegram company says it ia officially
announced that tho German post at
Schuckmannsbcrg, near Zambesi, South
Africa, surrendered without opposition
on September 21 to tho Rhodcsian po
lice.
Tho military correspondent of tho
London Times saya tho question of
officers is a Borioua one. An examina
tion of English casualty lists shows
tho loss of 1100 officers In killed,
wounded or missing. This Is two out
of every fivejimong thoso nt tho front.
Loans by Portland banks havo'in-
creased S2,G00,000 despito decrcaso in'
deposits, claims State Superintendent
or nanks, who pointB to conditions in
Oregon as evldonco that criticism of
Secretary of Treasury McAdoo, that
bonks aro hoarding monov. does not
apply on tho Coast.
Router'a Constantinople correspond
ent says tho former Gcrmun cruisor
urcsiau has been renamed MIdirll and
tho Goobon Sultan Sollm. Tho corres
pondent adds that the cruisers, accom
panied by Turkish gunboats and tor
pedo boats, havo been engaged in gun
practice in tho Black Sea.
"Popo Benedict XV. tho now Pon
tiff, Iibb a great lovo for America and
Americans, looking up to our govern
ment aa a model to all and an examplo
of tho best on thin earth," says Car
dinal O'Connell. "The holy fathor
writ a meagt of sincere good will to
tho people of this land," ho adds.
A Berlin dispatch to tho Ruotor Tel
egram company by way of Amsterdam
sayn a warrant Iihh been Issued for the
arrest of Abbo Wotterlu for high trea
son. Abbo Weltorlo Is a membor of
tho Rolclmtag from AlHaco.orralno
Hiid recently declared the neonlo of
iat provlnco wero waiting for tho.
'Vencli HoldluiB to roneuu them,
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