The Athena press. (Athena, Umatilla County, Or.) 18??-1942, September 17, 1926, Image 1

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    A
Entered at the Poet Office at Athena. Oregon, am Second-Claee Mail Matter
ATHENA, UMATILLA COUNTY, OREGON, FRIDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 17. 1926
SPAIN RESIGNS FROM
LEAGUE0F NATIONS
Germany Is Warmly Welcomed
by Assembly as a Mem
ber Friday.
Geneva. Spain Saturday resigned
from the League of Nations.
The official communique reads:
"The secretary . general of the
League of Nations this morning re
ceived through the Spanish . confeul
at Geneva a note from the Spanish
government, giving, formal notice, ac
cording to Article I of the League
Covenant, that Spain will withdraw
from the league on the expiration of
two years from date of receipt of the
note by the secretary general. The
document has been circulated to all
members of the league."
Germany was received Into ' the
League of Nations, Friday, amid
scenes of European reconciliation
which in their fire of enthusiasm has
been unexampled since the armistice.
Germany and , , France, through
Foreign Minister ' Stresemann and
Briand, committed themselves to per
petual peace and solemnly engaged
the honor of their nations henceforth
never to draw the sword but to settle
disputes by arbitration or compromise.
Two things stood out dramatically.
The first was Dr. Stresemann's pic
ture of present day Germany as grip
ped only by lofty ideals, determined
to dedicate her energies henceforth
to international co-operation based on
a high intellectual and moral plane.
This spirit, he said, had entered into
the very conscience of the German
people.
The second feature was the remark
able oration of M. Briand, whose
declaration that Germany and France
have had enough glory in the past and
need no further demonstration of
heroism, and whose proclamation that
the roar of guns had now been silenc
ed, evoked tumultuous applause.
THREE ARE DEAD
IN KANSAS FLOODS
Kansas City, Mo. Rivers and
streams in Eastern Kansas were
, spreading for miles over lowlands, in
undating farms, highways and rail
roads and causing, enormous property
damage.
Flood waters swept Burlington,
Neosho Falls, Madison and other
towns in the Nqosho and Verdigris
river valleys, following torrential
downpours of rain totaling from eight
to 11 inches.
Three lives were lost in the flooded
area of approximately 150 square
miles. Property damage will total
more than $2,000,000, it is estimated,
and the loss of livestock is reported
great. -
Little fear is felt for residents of
lowlands along the rivers, as ample
warning was received of the rising
waters. . "
Scores of farm houses were dam
aged by the overflow -while families
sought refuge in the uplands.-
AUTOMOBILE OIL DEALERS
(RE ACCUSED OF FRAUDS
With complaints on file against six
Portland . automobile- oil - dealers- or
alleged "unfair competition and sub
stitution of goods sold under a trade
name Portland motorists : have paid
at the rate of $50,000 a year for oil
value never received have been
brought to light, according to Dist
rict Attorney Stanley Myers., - ;
Filing of the complaints i Friday
afternoon was the climax, of an in
vestigation of service station method
and goods extending through two
months, during which the district at
torney's office found that cheap oil,
in several , instances, was sold for
high-grade lubricant at a clear profit
of 15 cents per quart.
. The allegations are covered by sec
tion No. 2180-4 of the Oregon code,
entitled "Unfair competition and sub-
sitution of goods sold under a trade
name or registered trade mark." As
sisted by Deputy District Attorney
C. W. Kirk, Mount visited hundreds
of service stations and garage dur
ing the past two months to buy oil for
a specially equipped car. The oil pur
chased, when poured into the pipe
which is supposed to connect with
the cran case, ran into a can con
cealed under the body of the car. The
can was then sealed and delivered to
a local chemist, who tested it for its
duality and compared it with the
brands it was intended to represent.
In six cases, according to the dis
trict attorney, it "was found that low'
grade oil, commonly selling for 20
cents per quart, had been substituted
for high-grade merchandise retailed
at 35 cents per quart. In several in
stances, the prosecutor declares, filt
ered, reclaimed oil was sold for newi,
When Mount made his purchases,
he took care that the man serving
him repeated the trade .name of the
oil asked for, he sets forth in the
complaints. His investigation had
the cooperation of the Independent
Dealers' association, and no com
plaints were filed until clear cases of
substitution had been established,
Kirk asserts.
Efforts will be made to bring the
defendants to trial within a week,
Kirk says. The fact that several
large oil companies have used nation
al advertising warning motorists to
buy their oil in sealed containers
leads to the belief that Portland is
not the only place where substitution
of inferior grade lubricants has tak
en place.
Not only have " the autoists been
paying more than the market price
for low-grade oil, according to Kirk,
but many have found their cars dam
aged after using some of the lubri
cants sold under names of nationally
known and indorsed oils. Though
there is no way to estimate the
amount of repair bills made neces
sary through the use of poor oil, i
is known that many cars have been
taken to shops with "scored cylinders
or burnt-out crankshafts as the re
sult .oi improper lubrication,
THE RADIO STATION KOAC
TO: HAVE JEW FEATURES
New features f the programs to
be broadcast over radio station KOA
C, Oregon Agricultural college, start
ing September 27, will be four ..home
tudy - courses Seed Production,
Poultry Farm Management, Basket
ball Practice, and Theory and Nation
al. Government. Anyone interested
may enroll in these courses by mail
ing Js name to KOAC. Enrolled
students will be furnished the i com
plete list of lectures in the course
concerned! and .dates on which, they
will be broadcast, a list of text books,
bulletin or other- material 'relating
to the course, and an outline of each
lecture before it is broadcast.
The seed production course consis
ting of 12 lectures' will be in charge
of G. R. Hyslop, r head - of the farm
crops department. It will cover the
practicol phases of seed production
and distribution for Oregon and the
northwest. Alfred G. Lunn, profes
sor of poultry husbandry, will give
the lectures in the poultry farm
management course. Robert H. Ha-
ger, originator of the famous, "per
centage" system of basketball, will
give the lectures on basketball prac
tice and theory. Dri F. A. Magruder,
professor of political science, will
have charge of the national govern
ment course. Final examination
questions will be furnished enrolled
students at the close of each course.
Those who pass will be awarded a
certificate, but no college credit will
be given.
BIG CORN CROP PREDICTED
Total Wheat Yield Also Promise to
be Materially Bigger.
Washington, D. C With crops near-
ing harvest, more definite indication
of production this year was given by
the department of agriculture in its
monthly report. September 1 condi
tions point to a corn crop of 2,697,
872,000 bushels compared with 2,578.'
036,000 bushels a month ago and I,
905,053,000 bushels last year.
Spring wheat indications are for
212,109,000 bushels, compared with
212,719,000 bushels a month ago and
270.875,000 bushels last year. The
preliminary estimate of winter wheat
placed production at 626,482,000 bush
els. compared with 395,610,000 bushels
last year.
RELICS SHOWN SCHOOL
Major Schoff of the Canadian
Mounted Police spoke at the high.
school auditorium Friday afternoon,
September. .JO. He had a large col
lection of relics brought from,, many
far awav barts of the earth. The
most interesting articles in. .this, col
lection were the skins of lions, brown
bears, polar bears, leopards, zebras
and alligators. He had many robes
made by. African and Indian girls,
and also uniforms of many different
armies. One of the uniforms, he
claimed was the type . worn by Na-
poleen's soldiers at the Battle of
Waterloo. Mr. Schoff, although past
sixty is still giving active service t?
the King of England. He plans to
visit many schools during the winter
and will return to his duties in Can
ada next summer.
BEACONS ON AIR. JAIL
ROUTE BEING SELECTED
Beacon lights and emergency land
ing fields are being selected on the
Pasco-Elko air. mail route. The se
lections are tentative and subject to
the approval of the department of
commerce and are as follows:
' No. 1 beacon On Coyote Peak at
Haines, Oregon; caretaker, Mr. Jen
kins. ;
No. 2 beacon--At Clover creek,
Oregon, on property ' of Elson Me
Canse, who, will act as caretaker. ? -
: No. 3 beaeon Ladds Canyon peak,
on property of R. D. McKennon; John
Conway, caretaker. . '
No. 4 .Beacon and emergency land
ing field of 40 acres at La Grande,
Oregon,' on ranch of J. E. Reynolds,
secretary of LaGrande Chamber of
Commerce. ; Occupant of ranch will
act' as caretaker.
lNo. 5 Beacon, Hilgard summit, on
property of A. J. Stange, . manager
of Mt. Emily Lumber company. Care
taker, H. F. Stairet.
No. 6 Beacon, Blue Mountain lum-
mit, near Kamela, Oregon, elevation
4600 feet, Caretaker, H. F. Stairet.
N0i 7 Beacon and emergency field.
Summit Deadman's Pass on property
of Umatilla Indians. Caretaker, D.
H. Kline.
No, 8 Beacon. Twelve mile north
of Pendleton at East Block siding.
The selection party was ; out Sun
day afternoon selecting site'j; for bea
cons No. 9 and 10 and for eigh', in
termediary lrghts, located between 8
and the Pasco airport. . .
As soon a3 all sites are selected
and arrangements made, complete
data- will be forwarded tJ Wasljingr
ton, D. Ci for approval of the depart
ment of commerce. As, soon ..as ap
proval.., is, received ' 4hstallaticn will
follow immediately. v--.vvV:.'!' 'IX ;
Pennsylvania's Contribution to the Sesqui
'Lost part 0Fr finger
While adjusting-the working parts
of an electric pump at his home
Tuesday morning,.. E... .A. Dudley lost
the tin of the - middle finger of the
right hand. Coming to Dr. Sharp's
office,, the severed digit was hanging
only by' the skin just back of the
finger nail. Dr, Sharp amputaW the
loose ! part and dressed the injury.
Fay LeGrow, who was present, lo
quaciously remarked to Mr, Dudley
that it was well that he still had his
"trigger finger."
Iter ; ?4M re1 v ii'
1 fTV f .. jT 7 f-'filjimiinniiiiiw iinnm .m , ,
I li . ! . ' n I Jp u ;f
I " nil It A - A!
NUMBER 38
ATTEMPT TO KILL
MUSSOLINI FAILS
Eight Bystanders Hurt When
Bomb Hits Automobile But
Premier Escapes.
Here Is the Keystone State's, building at the great Sesqul-Centennlal Inter
national Exposition at Philadelphia, celebrating 150 years of American Inde
pendence. In this huge structure Pennsylvania Is displaying her progress
from the arrival of Penn to the present day. The building is one of the
handsomest on the big exposition grounds and has proved a rendezvous for
hundreds of thousands of people who have come from near and far to see the
magnificent exhibits established by forty-three of the leading nauous the
world. The Exposition continues until December ,
Rome. Benito Mussolini, Italy's pic
turesque premier and Fascist leader,
escaped the third attempt made upon
his life within a year Saturday.
The third attempt to murder the
fascist ' dictator was a dramatic af
fair ct but a few seconds. As the
premier was riding in his closed lim
ousine from his home to the govern
ment offices, Ermete Giovannini, 26-year-old
marble cutter, stepped from
a recess and hurled the bomb.
The bomb crashed the glass at Mus
solini's side and fell not in the car
but back on the running board and "
then rolled to the ground. The chauf
feur, scenting danger, although he had
not seen the assailant, increased his
speed. When the bomb exploded with
a terrific detonation the car was 20
yards away and was barely scratched
by the flying pieces of the explosive.
Mussolini escaped without a wound
but eight people in the street lay
bleeding from superficial wounds.
Giovannini was captured immediately.
LEGION MOUNTAIN
Legion, mountain, named two years
ago and called the highest peak in
the Wallowa range, is 10,076 feet
high, according tq barqmeter meaa
urements, made. by L. A, Stanley,
county, surveyor. He found the Mat
terhorpkpeak in the same neighbor
hood next in height and only 25 feet
lower. Eagle Cap,' the best known
summit in the mountains because of
its commanding, : Central location, is
rated at a little less than 10,000 feet,
In the party which Stanley led to
the summit of Legion peak was one
woman, Mrs, Roy Currey of La
Grande, the first of her sex to make
the climb. The peak and its ap
proaches are steep rock and cliff and
are rather difficult.
PLANS LAND AT SALT
LAKE INSTEAD OF ELKO
A SPLENDID PRESENT
Fay LeGrow is wearing a handsome
belt, a splendid present given him hy
H. W, Collins, president of the
Round-Up Association. The leather
is elaborately stenciled and the buckh
and loop are of silver inlaid with
gold and beautifully, ornamented in
filigree engraving. In clever design
on the buckle is Mr. Le Grow's name.
PARSONAGE REPAINTED
The new Baptist parsonage, form
erly the home of Mr. and Mrs. M. L.
Watts, has been repainted on the ex
terior this week, by J. CHarrood,
assisted by Dean Pinkerton. T;
FIRST DEER OF SEASON
Friday morning Dean Dudley jitnied
to the mountains, and at lunch time
he returned to Athena with the first
deer of the hunting season. He was
accompanied by Everett Rothrock,
Dean's friends feasted on venison
steaks, , and- proclaim him to be thy
luckiest hunter in this bailiwick.
SAW A BEAR
While in the . mountains hunting
deer., Saturday, ale Stephens and
Norman Mclntyre saw a bear. Bruin
was within twenty feet of Dale who
could not get his rifle in action in
time to shoot 'before the bear dis
appeared in the brush. K
SMUTLESS WHEAT
Ten growers of Walla Walla coun
ty have , each, ; agreed to plant one
pound of albit wheat seed for experi
mental purposes this fall. A pound
will plant cne-sixtieth of an acre and
under favorable conditions should
produce 80 pounds of seed, according
to A. W. Kasten, county agent. Albit
is the new smutless winter wheat
developed at the state experimental
station.
Beginning October 1 the southern
terminal of the Elko-Pasco air mail
route will be changed from Elko to
Salt Lake City, it was announced by
Walter T. Varney, contractor for the
route, which serves the Pacific north
west. The arrangements to be
temporary, he said, until March 31.
The schedule as suggested by the
pestoflice department will provide for
departure from Pasco at 6 a. m., de
parture from Boise at 9:20 a m..
and arrival at Salt Lake City at
12:50 p. m. The northbound plane
will start at Salt Lake City at 9:15
a. m.. leave Boise at 1:15 p. m., end
arrive at Pasco 4:35 p. m.
The new schedule will permit an
earlier arrival at Pasco than at pres
ent, "and will eliminate the flight
over the Owyhee mountains between
Boise and Elko, They are more than
9000 feet high, and a forced langins
upon them In winter would be dan
gerous and possibly disastrous to
pilot and plane, fliers believe.
FRENCHMAN BREAKS
CHANNEL RECORD
St. Margaret's Bay, Eng. George
Michel, 40-year-old French swimmer,
broke the world's record for swimming
the English channel here when he
completed the crossing in 11 hours
and 6 minutes.
Michel left Cape GHz Noz, France,
at. 8:32 p. m. and splashed ashore here
at 7:33 a. m., thus lowering the record
ot 12 hours, 42 minutes set by Ernest
Vierkotter, German swimmer, August
30.
It was Michel's 11th attempt tor
swim the channel.
Michel's feat was the fourth time
the channel had been crossed this
year. It was the 32nd attempt.
Other swimmers to make the cross
ing this year were Gertrude Ederle of
New York, who established the wo
men's record of 14 hours and 31 min
utes; Mrs. Clemlngton Corson, only
mother to swim the channel, who ar
rived back in New York recently, and
Vierkotter, whose record of 12 hours
and 42 minutes was beaten by Michel
by one hour and 36 minutes.
AMERICA HAS MOST JEWS
AT THE ROUND-UP
Athena will be practically deserted
tomorrow, when business will be sus
pended and the inhabitants migrate
down to Pendleton, to attend the clos
ing day of the Round4Up.
DUMMY TRAFFIC COPS
The city council has installed a new
and better system of regulating traf
fic in turning the busy comer at
Main and Third streets, by installing
two dummy "traffic cops" where one
was in '. service before. In" the new
system the turning markers, connect
ed with a white marginal line paint
ed on the surface of the pavement,
have been placed in such position as
to do away with'the sharp turn that
has heretofore existed, and caused at
least three cars to smash into the
front of the Athena Hotel. ,
The Car Is Waiting
heed Smoot Wins Utah Nomination.
Salt Lake City. The republican
state convention has renominated
Reed Smoot to succeed himself as
United States senator from Utah. The
action was taken Friday by acclamation.
Five Killed In Midwest Floods.
Chicago. Five lives were known to
have been lost and" 2,000,0fl0 worth
c! damage had been done at Terra
Haute. Ind, and Jacksonville, IlL,rin
the third flood to sweep the central
west in ten days.
FOOTBALL ACTIVITIES
Coach Stolzheise issued his call
for football men the opening day of
school, find was" well answered with
fifteen men. . .He says that his men
will be in fine condition after about
three weeks of good stiff practice.
He hasn't given any of ,th;e fellows
a permanent. -pofettibn 6n the team.
The first eame will be Friday Sept
ember 24, but the opponents are not
yet known. It will be a practice
game for the boys. There are sever
al challenges from other schools.
PRESCOTT WINS
Enthusiasm vied with attendance
during the closing programs of the
annual Walla Walla county fair,
which terminated a three-day exhibi
tion Saturday evening. Prescott com
munity, with a display "featuring
grains, fruits and dairy products,
was awarded blue ribbon honors. The
upper county community Beared f-SO
points out of a possible 1000.
IT
v '
NEW MOUNTAIN ROAD
Weston Leader: Before snow flies
nine miles of mountain highway from
Toll Gate toward Table Rock will be
completed, according to Albert Bak
er, forest ranger. Seven miles of the
road have been finished. Maximum
grade3 are seven percent and most
grades do not exceed five. Automo
biles may now drive to the high point
at Bene springs, which overlooks the
head waters of the Walla Walla riv
er. The forest service has used twen
ty men, six horses and a tractor in
this work.
18,.
CANADIAN HARVEST
Hundreds cf students and office
clerks left Winnipeg on leave of ab
scence to answer an emergency call
for harvest workers in grain fields of
Calgary, Saskatchewan and Mani
toba. Thousands of workers, it was
said, were still needed. Harvest
hands from western Canada have
been auirmented by 1,335 men from
the United States. Immigration of.
ficials reported that many more were
enroute- from the south,
Population In Nation 4,400,000;
000,000 in World.
New York.- There are more Jews
in the United States than in any other
country In the world, says David
Trletsch, a German-Jewish scholar and
authority of Jewish statistics, in the
Jewish Tribune.
Estimating the Jewish population of
the world at 18,080,000 an Increase
of 150 per cent since 18S1 Mr.
Trletsch says tho number of Jews in
this country is 4,400,400. Poland has
a Jewish populutlon of 4,000,000 and
Russia Is next with 3,600,000.
New York leads the cities of the
world with a Jewish population of 2,
000,000. Warsaw is next with 400,
000, followed by Chicago and Vienna,
with 300,000 each.
WALLA WALLA STADIUM
Walla Walla school district has
paid it share toward the stadium
ground project, amounting to over
$0000, and the 40 acre tract has been
tranufcrred to the school district,
Whitman college and the Stadium
club. Erection cf seats for fall
Karnes is in progress and streets
leading to the grounds are being pav.
ed.
France to Reduce Army Personnel.
Paris. Reduction of tho French
army, as agreed upon by tho cabinet,
met with rather general public ap
proval. Tio plan provides for the
gradual reduction o the strength of
the army by 2700 permanent and 1200
temporary officers, bringing the total
down to 128,000, which Is 7000 fewer
than the pre-war figures. Other meas
ures include modification of the terms
ot army service, raising the minimum
Bge limit ot conscripts from 20 to 21,
in preparation for a bill reducing the
term of compulsory service to one
year.
MARY E. REEVES DEAD
The Weston Leader reports that
Mrs. Mary E. Reeves, an aged pion
eer woman of Oregon who resided in
Wwsturi for many years, was found
dead in her bed recently at the home
of her daughter near I aCrosse, Wash
ington. She wa the widow cf the
lrtUs Jesse Reeves, and was highly re-
'spected in -this cemmunity.
Olymplu, Wash. - Suit brought by
178 depositors of the defunct Ilwaco
State bpnk against John I'. Duke,
former slute banking supervisor and
Oltior. was dismissed by Superior
Jidgo George I). Simpson of Lewis
cuunty, according to word received
here.
Portland Oil Men Held for Fraud.
Pcrtlami, Or. Six Independent
service sturlon proprietors are under
arrest on charges of substituting iu
terior motor oil for quality products.