Semi-weekly Bandon recorder. (Bandon, Or.) 1910-1915, June 26, 1914, Image 1

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    Oregon Hi6toricrSocifty
City Hall , 5, , o X
"Si
1
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SEMI -WEEKLY
Advertisers!
Job Printing!
1 The Recorder covers the
X Bandon field thoroughly
BAND
RECORDER
t A modern equipped job J
t department in connection J
VOLUME XXX
BANDON,- OREGON, JUME 26, 1914.
NUMBER 49
HALUWELL
BAD ACTOR
t
SHERIFF OF DOUGLAS COUNTY
SAYS HE WORKED HIS GAME
FROM SEATTLE TO ASHLAND
WAS IN JAIL AT ROSEBURG
A man trivintr his name as Capt
Halliwell operated among the ranch
ers of this section last spring, taking
subscriptions for several farm publi
cations, has a bad record according
to Sheriff Quine of Douglas county
in a letter to C. II. Chandler, a ranch
er near this city.
Halliwell represented to some of
the ranchers that he had an auto
Jmobile at Roscburg and that ho could
not get his machine over the moun
tainsat that time so was making a
walking tour. To others he told
that ho was going t San Francisco
on the Elizabeth and to still others he
told different stories. Theso things,
however, were not so material as the
tact that ho was around getting the
peoples' money and giving them bgus
receipts for the same, and after wait
ing fr a long time for their p apers
the people began to look Into the p re
position. Mr. Chandler wrote to
Sheriff Quine of Douglas county who
is an uncle of Mrs. Chandler, and
Mr. Quine replied that the man Halli
well had beat everybody from Seattle
to Ashland and then came over into
this section. Mr. Quine said in his
letter that ho had Halliwell arrested
at Ashland and brought to Roseburg
where ho was in jail all winter for
the same offense that he was carry
ing on here, and that he had let him
out abut April 1st.
Imnjediately.,after his, release Hal-.
Hwell came over to Coca county and
began his operations again and after
some time dropped out of sight, and
the people who took hia receipts are
out their money.
EMIL LEE, WELL KNOWN
HERE, PASSES AWAY.
Emil Lee, a longshorcsman, who
has resided in Bandon for a number of
years and owned property here, died
in San Francisco this week, and
his body will be brough to Bandon on
the Elizabeth for burial.
Mr. Leo had been suffering from
pains in his head fr somo time and
went to San Francisco to consult a
specialist. The x-ray machine was
Used to locate the trouble and it wan
fund that there was a tumor in his
head. An operation was performed
to removo the tumor, but was not
successful and his death resulted.
Mr. Leo had many friends in Ban
don, who will learn of his death with
great regret, and his bereaved widow
will have the sympathy of all.
PORT ORFORD CARNIVAL TO
BE BIGGER THAN EVER.
At the Commercial Club meeting
last Saturday night the main topic
of discussion was the Agate Carni
val. It was decided to hold the car
nival at Agate Beach on tho Cth, 7th
and 8th of August. President A. J.
Marsh took the position that there
was no such thing as standing still
and that the carnival must either get
better each year or deterioate, and
in harmony with this spirit plans are
being made that will make the 1914
carnival bigger and bolter than ever
before. There are three organiza
tions nt Port Orford the Circle,
Woodmen of tho World and Commer
cial Club, and it is the present inten
tlons to have each of theso provide
the entertainment for one day. Feed
for horses, a restaurant stand, bath
houses, swings, and boats on tho
lake will be supplied. A large danc
ing pavillion and agate display room
will be erected on the grounds, and
un unusually Interesting program of
port is being prepared. At least
this U along the plan Mug frmu
lated now, that will bo fully decided
upon nt tho nutting of tho Coidiiut
rlul Club th! evening. T he Agate
Carnival l Port OruM't Mggtt !
VvrtUliitf aet, and eyurylxHly I n.
Vltwl t tttWwl Km WW'tlllg till MVl'llr
lug wktw tMull work will w gone In
it) h1 rWH44(lwi MjipolDMI'tirt
SEAMAN'S BILL WILL PASS
THIS SESSION OF CONGRESS
The seaman's bill will bo passed by
tho present session of Congress was
the news telegraphed from Washing
ton last week by tho president of the
International Seaman's Union of
America to San Francisco papers.
Aroused into activity by the Em
press of Ireland disaster, both the
Senate and the House committees
having under consideration the Lon
don treaty and the La Follctte sea
men's bill, have taken steps the past
week to enact the desired legislation.
The House committee on merchant
marine and fisheries on June 12 vot
ed to report fnvorably upon tho sea
men's bill and directed the chairman
to ask for a rule for its consideration
by the House of Representatives.
"This means that unless something
unforseen occurs .to prevent, that the
seamen's bill will be enacted into law
at tho present session of Congress,"
was the news wired to San Francisco.
"The passage of this bill will mean
freedom for the American sailor. It
will abolish the slave laws by which
the seamen of our country nro the
only persons who may bo punished
for violation of civil contract to la
bor, by being arrested as deserters,
detained and finally delivered back to
tho ship, or sentenced to a term in
prison, for the simple act of quitting
tho services of an employer. Under
tho present laws the seamen must
work until exhausted or go to prison
for 'disobedience of lawful command.'
Twelvo hours work every day, seven
days a week at sea is the minimum
often exceeded. In port fifteen to
eighteen hours a day, sometimes 30
to 40 hours at a stretch, are required
Then the vessel proceeds to sea and
without intervening rest, the men
begin their sea watches. With the
passage of the Seamen's bill nine
hours a day will constitute a day's
work for snilors while in port, except
in emergencies, and ats ca tho men
will Rave only watch and watch (two
on deck and three in fireroom."
Briefly stated, the objects of the
La Follette Seamen's bill are:
First T promote safety of life at
sea.
Second To give freedom to tho sea
men, to provide better conditions for
the seamen, and by sodoing inducing
a better class of men to follow this
occupation.
Third To put the American ship
owner upon an equal basis in compet
ing with foreign ships by eliminating
the differential in favor of foreign
vessels in. the wngo cost of operation
when competing with domestic ves
sels in taking passengers and cargo
from American ports.
WILL BOOST THE USE OF
OREGON MADE GOODS
Portland, Oregon, A new organ!
zation, The Oregon Industry League,
nas recently been formed m Portland,
the object of which is to conduct an
educational campaign for tho exten
sion of tho use of Orcgon-mado goods
of all kinds, for the encouragement of
all lines of industry in this stato nnd
for the moral and financial backing
of all Oregon institutions. L. Samuel
for many years prominent as a leader
on tKe movement for tho support of
Oregon industries, has been elected
president of the organization. Tho
campaign will bo carried on through
publications in the state, nnd tho
league may in timo establish an offi
cial publication of its own. Meetings
of all kinds, where the league can
propqrly send its speakers will be
covered and all largo conventions in
the stato will lie attended by its del
egates. Twenty-one leading civic and
commercial organizations of tho
state sent delegates to assist in the
establishment of the new league and
it is to bring to its assistance prac
tically every organization of impor
tance in tho state.
FOUR MILE WILL CELE
BRATE FOURTH OF JULY
Thero will bo a celebration at Four
mile, July 4th. Tho exorcise will
Hturt tit 10 u. in., when 1 J, Chat
burn of this rity will dolivor nn ml.
dre, after which them will ho u
lauki't dinner. Ill tho afternoon (hero
will lb dancing from 1:00 to 1:00 u ml
olhrr UIIiukohioiiIn, and diincllig uguln
at b'iOO i, m. Tlii-IU will o good iimj-
lc hiuI Mil who uttoiid limy n m
urM h( Hi wjll Imvo KW lima.
CHARLES J. SMITH, DEMOCRATIC
-
Pr. C. J. Smith, .democratic candidate for Governor, resides in Portland,
whoro ho Is well known a? a pljyslclan aiiil successful business man. He
was a member of tho Stato Senato front, 1002-1010, and stood closo to
Governor Chamberlain. Ho has njso, been ,a member of tho Stato Hoard of
Health and, Uio'Bonril.of Higher-Curricula."-"''- . -iJ-'Jfc ' '
Dr. Smith sfnsnt his early years on' an Ohio farm. He has-been a rest
dent of Oregon "slnco 1881. Dy those who know him hp Is said to be nn
Indefatigable worker and a closo student of public affairs. He has twice
travoled to Europo to Btudy foreign government nt first hand.
DENTISTS NOW LOCATED.
IN. FINE NEW OFFICES
Dr. L. P. Sorensci) and Dr. S. C.
Endicott, dentists, both of whom were
put out of business temporarily by
tho fire, have their new outfits horo
and Dr. Sorensen is located in tho
First jNational Bank building nnd Dr.
Endicott in the Ellingaon building.
Both have tho mst". modern equip
ment that is n tho market, with nine.
trie appliances and everything of. tho
very latest. . , ,
WEDDERBIRN MAN HURT
IN PECULIAR MANNER."
. I j. Carey, 'manairer of tho Wod-
edrburn. Trading company storo at
Rogue River, met with a painful' ac
cident Sunday' tlmt might have re
sulted fatally. He was going down
a steep trail on the river bank to
whero ho keeps his gasolino jboat,.
when a rock that had boon used for
yenrs ns a stopping stono gavo'way.
He fell headlong, striking his head on
another rock, lie was alone and roll
ed to the water's edge. The man wis
unconscious nt the timo, but on re
gaining his senses retumod to ' the
store and put in a call for the doctor.
Tho doctor found an ugly cnlp wound
that required several stitches ami a
numbor of minor bruisoa, but noth
ing sorious.-r-Port Orford . Tribune.
LARKY MILLER CONVlCTBI)
OF MYRTLE PQINT RORBER.V
Coquille, Juno 2fiAiI,arry Miller,
accused of robbing' tho 'Bank of MyV
tlo Point last November, was" fcfuntl
guilty this afternoon. TJho jury
was out five hours. ' M.illflVVi attorney
made a motion-for, now trial Jjnnied.
lately after tho Jury rutumed it ver-.
diet. The conviction, wob made. who),
ly on ciraimstnnclnl uvldenee.
Chri Kuaniustm who returned from
Portland hint night toUl JJwt ill
though ho tmw lota of jieoplu, liuatiit
wan quift In J'ortlmwl, and tlmt Port
I it ml people totd ttwt Win vulloy
town were all very (pint. Dniujou
MHUiui (a bv ub tivttf m Mty (own in
I ho alnlft ntmrMm f tfc few, uml
with prewpMl urnfto ut rwbuH4tt
Hwih wtU mm ilmM Ui $hh& AtUWty
)uit in u lwit um,
CANDIDATE FOR GOVERNOR
Brief Local News.
M. Bruor has lcen on the sick list
for a few days with an attack of la
grippe. '
Alfred Johnson, Sr., president of
the Alfred Johnson Lumber Co., is
in Bandon today, looking after bus
iness 'affairs.
Both Seeloy & Anderson's and
Craino's logging camps have closed
down u. til after the Fourth. They
will probably resume work again on
Monday, July (5th.
Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Nielson have
bought the furniture of Mr. and Mrs.
L. .7.' Brandenburg, and arc moving
into tho McCloskey residence re
cently vacated by the BrandeTiburg's.
The debris from tho fire is being
rapidly cleaned up and in a short
timo tho ground will be cleared so
that when tile time comes to start
the new buildings" everything will bo
in readiness.
Leo Mrras was down from Coquille
Wednesday looking after business
and shaking hands witli friends.
Morras & Son have their catterpillar
engine at Coquille and nro doing
road work near that city.
Miss Kate Rosa returned Tuesday
evening from Portland, whero she had
boon in attendance at tho Roso Fes
tival and the Grand Lodgo O. E. S.,
.being -a delegate from Occidental
Chapter f this city.
: Work is proceeding rapidly on tho
jrepair of the Dyer concrete building
occupied by O. A. Trowbridge, and
also o n C. Y. Lowe's building. When"
theso two buildings are completed
that part of the city will have a more
Imsinoii like nppoarnnco again.
J. L. Kronenburg sailed on the
Speedwell for Han Francisco, and
whllo thuro will look- Into tho money
elttmtlo. When ho retuniM tho peo
ple who lout their buildings In the fire
will know more definiU'ly what they
will do about rebuilding nt onco
.Mr. nnd Mr. I.. I- lirundonburg
lull on the Charm loduy for Mumh
Hold mImio Ml, HiiHt-lniilniig will
ak tiit, MjimmIwuJI for Him FruimlMo
r l willfJ'i))ulji for toinu lliiw.
Jr. tlmtutmUnig will return to Hull'
k unmrrnw.
SEASIDE CIRCLE HOLD
FAREWELL RECEPTION
At thcclosc of tho rogulnr meet
ing of Seaside Circle, Women o
Woodcrafe. held in IC. of P. Hall last
night, a farewell reception was ten
dered to Neighbor Grace Smith, who
soon leaves for North Bend, where
she will make her future home. Whil
everyone present seemed happy, there
was n feeling of regret, because
Neighbor Smith hns been one of tho
most faithful members of the Order
hero since it was organized eight yrs
ago. She has been the clerk of the
lodge for the past six years, during
which timo she has always mot the
members with a smile and all who
had dealings with lpr were given
cheerful greetings and pleasant
words.
Tho banquet Thursday night wa
well attended, tho dinbjg room was
beautifully decorated and as to the
good tilings to eat, only those pros
cnt can describe.
Neighbor Minerva Lowin acted as
toast mistress, and to forget Mr. Low
m would be doing him an injustice.
The responses to various toasts
showed that the good will of all was
extended to Mrs. Smith.
At the wee small hours all departed
for their homes wishing Neighbor
Smith health and prosperity in her
new home, and that some day she will
be back to Bandon to live. About 35
were present.
GOOD PROGRAMS AT GRAND
SATURDANY AND SUNDAY,
Saturday's bill of pictures featur
ing n two part Essanay comedy drama
"The Wedding of Prudence." The
Essanay players are at their best in
this story and will surely score a big
hit. "When a Woman Guides." a
Biogranh films nortravinc a nolitica
- - - ,
story in tho tenement district, very
entertaining. "On the Brink," a fine
Lubin character study of a wife who
was kept from going wrong througl:
tho love for her baby.
Sunday night's bill is suro to please
with nn Edisu two-part feature entit
led a "Romance of tho Everglades'
with Mabel Trumclle as leading lady,
It's a gripping story of tho Florida
everglndes nnd of a man who forgot
his engagement to a society girl when
he met a native daughter. But his
fickleness nearly 1st him his life at
the hands f her father and an infur
iated mob, when they believed him
rcspnsihlo for her death. "An Eas
ter Lily,' a ViUigraph comedy in
blnck nnd white, very good. Hearst
Sclig news films, chuck fjill of inter
sting events. Admission 10c and Cc.
HE RAILROAD ALMOST
REACHES EUREKA, CAL.
County Surveyor Connors returned
o Eureka from a trip to Sacramento
oming overland in a private machine
There remains about fifteen miles of
rails to be laid before the Northwes
tern Pacific "gap" is closed, accord
ing to Connors, who met somo of the
contractors while coming north. Rails
aro now laid past i Alderpoint and by
tho end of the week it is expected
they will be down as far ns Cain
Rock, leaving nbout 12 miles f "gap"
between the nrthern and southern
terminals. The rails aro being laid
nt the rate f a mile a day. It is be
lieved the grading will be completed
between Cain Rock nnd Inland Moun
tain tunnel in short order after the
Cain Rock bridge is completed which
will bo in a fow days. Onco the
grading Is completed It will require
less than two weeks to lay tho rails.
hurekn Standard.
Witli the closing of the gap be
tween San Francisco and Eureka thd
Southern Pacific will be in a position
as soon as-the financial situatjn of
the country becomes settled, to go
ahead with the construction of Die
piece of road between Marsiifield and
Eureka and thus have a practically
water level road to San Francisco. It
is known that this has leen tho plan
of tho company for many years.-
Marshfield Record.
NORTH BEND EDITOR
OFF ON ANNUAL VACA'HON
Ivdgur McHunlol, editor of Hie Coo
iiuy llnil.or, umii)punled by hi fam
ily, loft wmily fur III Miiiuiimr vu
tution in tfoyllwrji fluA, 'J'Jioy
MYRTLE PT.
TO CELEBRATE
UPPER VALLEY TOWN PREPAR
ING FOR BIG TWO DAY'S RACE
MEET AND CELEBRATION ON
JULY 3RD AND 4TII.
Myrtle Point is preparing for a big
two day's celebration July 3rd and
4th. The annual midsummer races
will be held at this timo and an ex
cellent program is being prepared.
The enterprising peojplo of Myrtle
Point are advertising their celebra
tion very extensively by posters nnd
through tho press f tho county. Wo
have a quarter pago ad in this issue
announcing the events.
Myrtle Point pcoplo have always
responded with a good crowd when
Bandon has celebrated, and this year
when we ore not celebrating, would
be ngood time to reciprocate.
WILL OPERATE PURSE
SEINE NEAR BANDON.
Bandon has a company of local
capital, says the Marsiifield Sun, that
is going yito deep sea fishing on a
largo scale. They propose to operate
a purse seine in the open sea. "This
method of fishing has been aplicd,
and successfully, outsido tho Golden
Gate at San Francisco and in north
ern waters. The fish sought for nt
Bandon are salmon, but all members
of the fi n ny tribe that come in con
tact with the purse seine will be taken
This seino is operated by means of two
boats, two crafts being generally us
ed for the purposes of drawings the,
ends of thd net together after it'h'as '
been laid out.
"FU FU, THE BAND
LEADER," COMING
A real live comedy picture with the
punch behind it is as rare as a chick
en's tooth. When you seo "Fu Fu.
the Band Leader," a Keystone spec
ial feature in two parts, at tho Grand
next week, Friduy, July 3rd, you want
to icavo your worries outside, and
get ready for the richest lautrh that
has tickled your anatomy for a long,
long tune.
"Fu Fu, the Band Leader" of flow
ing hair and wnviner nrms is somo
freak and the stunts pulled off in the
vinago suro makes some fun. Wo
don't want to tell you the story, tho
films can do that much better, and be
sides it keeps you guessing what's
coming next. Remember "Fu Fu"
will play at tho Grand next Friday,
July 3rd. Watch for posters.
NOTHING DOING IN
BANDON JULY FOURTH
Thero is nothing scheduled for
Bandon on July 4th, although pre
parations were under way for a grand
celebration when the firo put a quie
tus on tho whole uffair. Bandon peo
ple will probably celebrate with tho
qther towns of tho county. Some are
going to Myrtle Point, others to Marsh
field and still others are going to
Fourmile. There are also a number
of picnic being planned' by Bandon
folks.
BIG FIRE SALE IS
PROVING GREAT SUCCESS
The big firo sale at Trowbridgo's i
proving n great success. Wednesday
morning when tho doors were opened
at 10:00 o'clock tho street was lined
with people waiting to get in. In fact
tho throng was so great that only a
purl of them could get in at u time
nd the doors had to ho closed in a
short timo so tho people already In
the Ktoro could bo wafted upon,
I horo wore n grout many g ood
largains for t hebuycrH, und tint fuct
that so many people ure taking ud
vunUigo of Hid sale Ih another ovl
euro inui it iiuy to udvnrlo, Mr.
'rowhrhlgo ntrrlod ii Imlf imgo ud.
In both Friduy' und Tuumluy' Ru.
ttwr, Niinouudiig llm big nI mid
IIiijn Hid now itf (ho uu wh fiiudu
mown lo M'Vi) liouu'nd Isolde fi
mvt mmni fwiwon, who wt ijuit
I j Ik J ' T T
19 fjsijioiiij.