Rogue River courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 1886-1927, November 08, 1907, Image 4

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    ROGUE RIVER COURIER. GRANTS PASS, OREGON. NOVEMBER 8. 1907.
TV Thousand Dames
On the Baltic Game
American Men to Claim.
To captive p ople andjain
their good wi.l and con
fidence, so as to lead to ex
tensive business relations,
we are offering them the
finest line of Groceries they
ever beheld for their mon
ey. Here are some facts
and figures thai you can't
evade.
New Nuts, New Comb Honey
, . , !ee the Pumpkins for Hallow'ein
J. Pardee, Sfte Grocer
Front St net
Grants Pmmm
With oar fruit growing, extenaive
timber interests, rich mine and such
thing to back ni op, what commu
nity can offer greater inducement to
the prospective homeseeker? And.
too. where can there be found a mure
aaperb clircate than this? No won
der people are inclioed to regard this
as" God', country."
THE ROGUE RIVER COURIER
GRANTS PASS. OREGON.
Published Every Friday.
Subscription Rataai
One Year, in advance,
Hi Mori Hm,
'Aire Months,
tlingle Copiea,
Advarllalna Rfttai
Fumlahad on application at the office, or
HiAtitmrimm ftnfi ...nlnilnn. nt run
dolence will he charged (or at 6c per line;
J - ' 11 l. an-
wuyi itiftiiutMj.
A. E. VOORHIES,,
W. E. WILLIS,
Pro pb.
Editor
Entered at the pout office at Grant.
Oregon, at aecond-claaa mail matter.
I'asi
FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 8. 1907.
Some of the Woodburn merchant
have been giving their oaitomera
short weight and now they are in the
toili of the law. The atate inspector
will toon round np the oltlee and
town of Boa them Oregon.
Many per too a are taking advantage
vttht drpreaaed financial market and,
acting upon the "pointer" which Mr.
Harriman had given them they are
ioveatlng their ainall aavlngalo bond
and atocki, expecting to lee the prlcea
toon begin to Dick np ataln.
Now that the apeoial low railroad
rate from the Eaat are to .till be
given until the flrat of the jear, we
oau have our friend and relatifea
who are already beginning"! to ihiver
in anticipation "of a long"wiiler
eaaon, come oat here and enjoy life
in ibii ideal climate.
Editor Murray, of the Klamath
Republican telli of at leaat one man
in that region who does not propose
O hil worldly noaaeaainna tnr
bom a other loralltT Jr
Faauiauy audi people" and "theyare
growing more nnruerou every day,
too.
When we read of the president of
the big life insurance comiianiea and
the Wall itreet gainMrra beiug sent
to the peuitcntiary for their wrong
doings, it certainly Jug ample
cause to believe that day when Mter
thinga are expected, ia not far off.
These ate the daya whan the
"knocker" get iu Ilia bent work. He
ia having the opportunity of hit life,
in Lis vain endravo' to create ana
pinion regarding the aoundiiem of
the local bank. Hut he la "potted,"
and bin poor effort will prove to be
worae than uelw.
bloih of Rbaine to aay ordinary indi
vidual who wa. taking the taxpayer!'
money and not returning any er-
vices. Snob aotiona on the part of
the.igreat organ aocounta, in a large
meaanre. for the way the masses
literally iwear by it.
After haviog weathered the atormi
of the paat aix year, the Gardiner,
Douglas county, Oregon, Gazette .no
camb. Lack of support i given as
the cane of the demise, by Miss
Martha Howard, who baa been con
ducting the sheet for the pant three
month.
Theae are the days when the
calamity bowler flourish in all bis
glory. Yon can hear him say, parrot
like: "I told you so, " and then he
proceeds to diaguose the ills of the
day, bat he seldom, if ever preient
a practicable remedy. He is oertainly
a deluaion and a snare and a nuisanoe
In any community.
Our cannery is mating a record for
putting np a fine pack and as a
natural contequenoe, the big, whole
sale house are anxious to secure goods
from this plant. Next year the es
tablishment will be very materilly en?
Urged and it wilfthus'be enabled to
handle a much larger volume of busi
ness.
Our own Jonathan Bourse, by his
honest endeavor to actually compel
President Roosevelt to permit his
name to once more be uaed for that
bigh office, has "stirred op the ani
mals, " .polite! ally speaking aod all
the anti-administration organs are
now turning their gum on "Oor
Jonathan." But he has a big bank
accoont and, what is far better, he
baa pnblio sentiment at his back.
So, why should he fear what thee
fellows can do?
And so the railroads would show
tbeir hand by endeavoring to make
capital oo t of the financial depres
sion and if possible cause the people
to blame President Rooaevelt for the
trouble! Bot they cannot fool the
American people after any .uch fash- cam. and aome nervous .v'duals
ion. They have been watching the began to make inqnirie. long that
drift of matter, and can .ee which line. If the, bad any doubt, ir that
way the wind i. blowing. Instead of direction, what " ' "
weakening the President, in the ey. now be allayed by the fine ,.ho ng.
oftb. voters, they have onlv added made and published the last Courier
'aaMaaaWaaa , - 1 A i Mfl IPal IDTlB fil
hi. laoels. The m-tieris.uur nana r
settled. Perhaps it may ! the staouuy oi me .
1 1 TKa art
ano her case of "he gion wnom rney reprrBOU,.
Just both conducted upon a saie, couservn
luster to
by no means
torn out to be ano ber case
that laughs lant, laughs best.
wait and see what the President does.
Ibis week the school teachers of
Josephine county have fairly takeu
Grants Pass, while the annual
teachers institute is in session. We
are glad to have them with ns aod
wish for them a successful aud
profitable meeti
a grand work and
to even estimate its importance, it
therefore behooves them to make all !
tive banis and the depositor, have etry
reason to feel sscure about their
finances.
In our "What People Say" depart
ment, we olten quote people who
think they have a complaint to make,
but who do not care to oome out and
prefer to have
course they
may have a gooa excure. miming
, a succewful aud j uu u"
ng. T'.ey are doing "P"1
ind w. cannot begin leix name, withheld. Of
that if the real aothor of the article
the preparation pos.ible aod th.t i.j i qoe.on i. known, then it will not
the very rea.on why they are called b? ' 0,herwlM
I, a. a . Int.r. I ... a.
together, in order to have an inter
change of plans and ideas
We really did not begin to realize
how solid our home banking institu
tions were, notil , the little flurry
is better than none at all," and
doubtless this is one of the cases. We
much prefer to have people willing
to talk in pnblio about such matters
as they do in private. But it was
ever thus and doubtless will w,
thnsly to the end of time. nti,"
A promlnt rVBadn"ea, V,n
write, from Ashland to the v
ford Tribune, wanting that
help eetabli.h "hot ,ir.. Z
tlon at Ashland. He take. T'
to write after thi. fashion -"vl?
The Tribune i. .11 right, though J
i. full of hot air and balloon lo i
Thar, what i. I. needed to
up these old moiaback. in Rontk
Oregon. We need . hot ai, p?
A.hland to get the leader, out of kh .
Rip Van Winkle lethargy Our 7
editor, here are both good. reilgi(!?
men, but they have both been heV
long in the same .tall that they
too foil of prune to ran a live rir,.!
in a town of MOO people. Send I
newspaper man foil of hot air to hal
get awake. Onr .treet comai?
sioner ha. bcn walking in hi. ,i
alLummer. and our mayor and cii!
counci have plenty of pio. dre. J
bot thi. i. f,r thej g.
aocomplian nothing. They are a littu
the drowsiest we have had In lft
years." "
Greater Grants Pass
A Few Facts Which are Now Before Us
The Future of Grants Pass not to be handed Over to Capitalists.
1 7.
We are glad to know that more
branches ol th. Grange are to be or.
gaolsed throughout Josapine county,
within the next few weeks. Thi.
organization seem, to be junt what is
desired in the rural communities and
it i. accomplishing much good, all
over Oregon.
My, hut how the Oregouinn "goes
after" one of the prominent official
nf Multnomah county! Even if he
doea hold the hiKh-aoumliug jtitle of
'Judge, "Hint paper alio w a not fear nor
favor, but proowda to givo hia record
1" "'in r that vroulil Hiring the
Why i. it that the Southern Pacific
hould discriminate againat the people
of Southern Oregon, by taking off two
of III paaaenger train aod run them
only from 'Roteburg to Portland?
The aervice ha. been poor enough at
beat and now it will ; be miserable.
Our people are highly indignant
over inch proceeding, and rightly so,
too.
From all over the land comes the
report that the prlcea of all com
modities are to come down very per-
ceptibly. This will Jbe welcome news
to the people who have to live on
moderate wages. Of course the trait
manipulators and Wall Street gam
blers will not care a bean. In fact,
they would probably rather have the
high prices prevail all the time.
Oue of the noteworthy events iu
Grant Paxs, this week, was the
grand opening of the new opera hoone.
The large and farhionahln audience
which accepted the kind invitation of
Manairer Kinney, enjoyed the program
which was afforded theiu. We are in
deed fortuuate in having uch a public
spirited man in oor community and it
ia dne to his interest iu the welfare
of the community that we now have
the Urgent and bent opera bouee iu
Oregon.
The BrraDe industry if nronerlv look-
ea alter oy the citizens of Grants Pass
will make Grant. Pass a city four times
a. large as Sacramento. Sacramento
was built and is being maintained
chiefly from the product, of between
20 and 30 thousand acres of vineyards
while Grant. Pass has much more land
tributary to it. which are more valuable
for grape culture than anv lands in
California or any other part of Ameri
ea, together with all its other valuable
resources. If vou would pause and
think for one moment what this means,
you will readily Bee what these indus
trie, will do for Grants Pass.
Capitalit. are now considering
the purchase of large tract, of land for
vineyards In this locality. They see
the opportunity which we are appar
ently yallowing to pasB un-noticed.
However, we understand that there is
to be between three and four hundred
acre, of TOKAY grape, planted here
this fall by people who live and are
doing business in Grants Pass.
It is to be hoped that we will not do
with the grape business as we did with
the timber. Only a short time ago
any one of us could have taken from
the government 160 acres of heavily
timbered lands and paid for it at the
rate of $2.60 per acre. These same
lands are now worth from $10 to $100
per acre. Reader, look back for a
minute on what you might have made
in the timber business. Do not tarrv
long with your gaze in that direction,
but look forward to the grape
business. Do not let it tret
into the hands of large syndicates.
Out of the thousands of timber claims
which have been taken in the past five
years, not over four claims were taken
by Oregomans who live in Rogue River
Valley. Let us profit by our mistakes.
The grape induntry as it now appears
is to be our salvation. If grapes con
tinue to grow in the Rogue River
Valley as they have for the past 33
years without a failure the profit would
be many times greater than had the
same amount of money been invested
in timber, as the profit is increasing
annually and continues indefinitely.
At the present time there seems to
be quite a flurry in the money market,
which now appears to be nearly at an
end, which we believe will finally work
out to bojthe best thing that ever hap
pened to the coust. Reader, did you
know that the banks of the Tacific
Coast have on deposit with the so
caned strong oanKs in the hast over
J
i .J-.-:
A FIVE POUND BUNCH OF TOKAY GRAPES
annual resources of Grants PaRRnrennp vinevnrri onr? tho Comnon J.
, .. unuijjavu VIIICJTBIU,
million dollars, we can safely state that men who have been up to the Nelson
k. -I . 1 . ...
Mie means 100 more towns tne place, wnere they saw over one thous
sire of Grants Pass to be built
w C "fv-o JIVUUV.CU VII UIIC
Pacific Coast or add the equivalent to vine without cultivation; men who are
our many prosperous towns. However, j looking carefully into the future of
in the buildine of our town and locality, i this town
. , " J ' ww nicjr uc
it is not money that we want, so much lieve as we do, that the grape industry
as people, people who have a desire will solve the permanent monev mak-
and will to work towards building up j problem for us, Something which will
YOUR DOG
If ho is woll kept, ho is fnrnishod by nat
uro with a slook flossy ooat; a littlo ox
oroiso on n warm day piws hi.n pants;
ovoryboily jjivos hitn outl's, and you suroly
ou-lit to ho willing to furnish' his collar.
A cood collar adds more to tho appoanuuv
of a dog than a yard of podigrtv, it marks
him as a rvspocted moinlvr of sooifty
one with frh nds. You will lind a swell
hno of Manhattan Dog Collars at
JOE WHARTON'S
Paddotks Old
Bkvtle Dm
permanent resources for our localitv
whioh cannot be shaken by the money
gamblers. What could be more effect
ive than grapes? See the different
ways in which they could be handled.
Were the entire Rogue River Valley
planted to TOKAY grapes we could
not supply the market of the cities of
the United States to say nothing of
foreign countries.
Reader if you have more lands which
are ailuitt.1 tn crmmi niiltii,. ik.n
1 u 1 1 tuaii vuu
one hundred and fifty million dollurs as 1 and your family can plant and take care
n .... if... fti..l Vl'k... t. o.. it .a 1 i t .
" "; " ' iwi iiu u . ui, piani wnat you can and make it
there would be a possibls flurry in the ' possible for a few more families to go
money market Grants Pass for instance into the grape industry, in our valley
which has a large reserve fund in the by selling them the lands which you
Eastern hanks, could wire Chicago and cannot utelizc, Do nut retard the de
New York and send its entire reserve j volopment of your locality by holding
fund to Portland by wire and in turn on to lands you cannot develop. Turn
wire Portland to send the same amount them over to people who want to use
io mem ov nisi express, in this wav : them now. ;f u . .
i return their large reserve to their own , ten or twenty acres of land which vou
I iiun. n.v.iiu iixuib. .never oeiore in are going to put into grapes this year
. the history of modern finance have the procure it now before the price gets
so called . strong banks of the Fast out of your reach.
I positively refused to transfer a dollar I If w"e had 50.0m acres of grapes
of these reserve funds and by having planted around Grants Pass producing
so refused, have they not done the , $;?00 per acre annually, figure the re
heat thing for the Pacific Coast which suits. The present Source, of our
could have happened You know locality are about one million dollar,
the Eastern banks did not serve the 1 per annum. Did vou ever stop to
purpose, therefore it resolves itself in- think how long the "people have been
to a business proposition that not only working to get our resources up to
the banks of Grant. Pass but those of , that amount? Over 50 years How
the Pacific Coast will never send their , many acres of grapes would we have
reserve funds to Eastern banks. You to plant to double our resources' It
know that h t.nmt -ha.. .t.u... I c.wurves. 11 ,
. .. "- wouiu ciouole the population of the
!:. r;hi:t. r" u ,ht: u'wn- duuw the Wuiation. ia it
" , "J ,'",,'1"',v" , fart that vou will double
gold finding its way into the business property values.
cnanne s west of the Uoky Mountains. ! At tins ,Kint we call your
.1 ,.,( ., . .. . lno loiiowm,. afluiavits made by within two snuar. f tii 7"
'ii-i is con- nvinv nnim n... i.....: .... . . umic3 alla
-e the ' city; ,,ln I pf d belief
- v u ?u e:irn nr rri... ...n... ...
. nun wuiuams lour
bring millions of dollars annually of
ioreign money to our town to bui d
and stimulate all industries.
C. H. Sampson, first being duly
sworn, deposes and says: That I am a
resident of Grants Pass. Oretron. and
have a small vineyard two miles north
of town, which is but three years old,
and that I harvested and sold one hun
dred and thirty-two dollars per acre
worth of grapes from these lands this
yer- C II. SAMPSON.
Subscribed and sworn to before me a
Notary Public for Oregon.
Grants Pass, Oregon, Nov. 8, 1907.
E. L. CHURCHILL,
Notary Public.
Compare this with what thev tprm
the rich grain country.
J. X. Nelson, first beinir dulv
deposes and says: That I am a ri.
dent of Grants Pass, Oregon and that
I have one grape vine which is a volun
teer and to my best knowledge I h-
lieve had over one thousand pounds of
maritetable grapes on it this year.
JOSE X. NELSON
Subscribed and sworn to before me a
Notary Public for Oregon.
Grants Pass, Oregon, Nov. 8, 1907.
E. L. CHURCHILL,
Notary Public.
635 vines per acre: make vour nm
estimates as to the true value of these
lands.
W. B. Sherman, first hei au.
t sworn deposes and says: That he is a
; resident of Grants Pass anH that t,
the:W. B. Sherman RoalM. r
recently purchased from C. H. Sampson
the grapes on t-n vm.. .u:u -
- . ..v. III II Hrc
corned) in Eastern banks.
I
crate, of TOKAY grape, and that
these vines are but four years old.
W. B. SHERMAN.
Subscribed and .worn to before me a
Notary Public for Oregon.
Grant. Pass, Oregon, Nov. 8, 1907
E. L. CHURCHILL,
Notary Public
TOKAYS $1.75 per box, four crate,
per plant, 535 vines per acre, use your
arithmetic.
The Realty Company ha. raised a
tent over these two vines and will
undertake to preserve the fruit on
them until the middle or last of the
winter.
We the undersigned do hereby swear
that we believe the statement, herein
are true, namely:
That land, can be bought, cleared,
and planted to grape, and Jcaredlfor,
for aix year. for;$125 per acre and if
properly cared for would produce it
leastO per acre the third year, $80
theffourth year, $160 the fifth year,
$250foerlacre:the!sixth vearlanH tinn
- w yvvy
or more per acrefeachfyear thereafter
ior an unlimited number of yean.
And we further believe that the"vin
yard would be worth$2,600 perfacre at
me enu oi maritime.
A. H. CARSON,
Redland Vineyard.
C. H. SAMPSON,
Fruit Grower.
LINCOLN SAVAGE,
.Supt. County School..
H. L. ANDREWS,
Secy. Commercial Club.
W. H. FALLIN,
County Assessor.
GEO. S. CALHOUN, .
Merchant and Miner.
R. H. O'NEILL, Merchant
W. B. SHERMAN,
Manager W. B. Sherman
Realty Company.
Subscribed and Sworn tn K
Notary Public for Oregon.
urant. Pass, Oregon, Nov. 8, 1907.
E. L. CHURCHILL,
Notary Public
Is it not a fact that the 1
actually worth at least $1,000 per acre?
Reader you can buv all that n,i a,.t
from $20 to $50 per acre. You had
better do it now. This is not only ra
"Land of Milk and Honey" but it will
soon be a Land of Grapes and Money.
JThe above affidavits indicate that we
can make 300 per cent each year for
six years on our investment If a man
would prove to you that you could
make twenty per cent per annum on a
ten years' investment, you would fall
all over yourself to get it Here is
300 per cent and with verv little i nvest-
ment, very little if any risk, very little
worn to.lake care of and it doesn't take
a man with years of experience in this
line in order to make a success of the
grape business. All that is necessary
is to make a careful selection of
grounds and attend to the plants well.
The climate of the Rogue River Valley
will do the rest.
We should all work together for the
upbuilding of our town, county and
valley. If you cannot boost don't
knock. Do not worry over present
financial conditions. Your money in
the bank is just as good as ever. How
ever, to remove the slightest doubts.
would it not be well to make a change
of base and invest in grape lands as
the clearing house eprtific atoa are ac
cepted at par in exchange for said lands
and by so doing you will not only bene
fit your own purse but you will also
assist in building and maintaining a
greater GrantsPass. t-.j - ;
For Choice Grape Lands'
See th
W.B.Sherman Realty CoT