The Columbia press. (Astoria, Or.) 1949-current, July 02, 2021, Image 1

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    The Columbia Press
1
Clatsop County’s Independent Weekly
www.thecolumbiapress.com
Home sweet
motorhome
Finding fun ways to celebrate Fourth of July
A member of Fur
and Feathers 4-H
Club shows off his
rabbit. The group
won the Mayor’s
Trophy in Warren-
ton’s 2019 parade.
Bottom left: Miss
Clatsop Coun-
ty 2019 Ranisha
Speed.
Bottom right:
Those riding in Big
River Excavating’s
big rig spot some
friends.
By Cindy Yingst
The Columbia Press
See ‘RVs’ on Page 4
Vol. 5, Issue 27
July 2, 2021
City struggles with
RVs as residences
Homelessness isn’t a problem easily
solved.
Yet Warrenton leaders are deter-
mined not to allow their city to be-
come a haven for illegal camping as
Portland has. You won’t find rows
of ramshackle tents surrounded by
mounds of trash, human waste and
hypodermic needles.
Unless you look really hard …
Police and private citizens have spent
the past few years clearing the woods
and vacant spaces of “illegal campers”
and removing tons of garbage.
But what to do about people living
in campers and trailers on public and
private property?
“We’re not the only community
that’s facing this,” Warrenton Police
Chief Matt Workman said.
His agency takes many calls about
homeless people who are causing
problems or making a home where
they shouldn’t.
“We’ve never been
proactive on this; we’ve
always been reactive,”
he told city commis-
sioners during a work-
shop on recreational
vehicle issues.
During a quick sur- Workman
vey before the meeting,
Workman shot photos of RVs that
were illegally parked or had people liv-
ing in them outside of approved camp-
ing areas. Of the 256 RVs he counted,
a fifth appeared to have people living
in them and another nearly one-fifth
possibly had people living in them.
50 ¢
Photos by Cindy Yingst
The Columbia Press
After 16 months of life-altering
COVID restrictions, Clatsop County
residents are ready to party.
Local cities and community groups
are getting together to ensure a
grand celebration of the nation’s
245th birthday.
Warrenton residents will see
a return of the city’s traditional
old-fashioned Fourth of July parade
after last year’s pandemic-predicat-
ed hiatus. However, the car show,
firefighters’ barbecue and other
events won’t make a comeback until
2022.
“Parade planning is going great,”
Parade Director Mike Moha said.
“We have well over 50 entries al-
ready and … the final few days we
usually get another surge. I have
heard nothing but excitement from
everybody about the parade. The
people are ready.”
See ‘Fourth’ on Page 6
When to go
Warrenton parade: 3 p.m. Sunday
Astoria fireworks: 10 p.m. Sunday
One of state’s oldest unidentified person’s cases is solved
On July 11, 1963 – nearly 60 years
ago -- the body of a fully dressed de-
composed toddler was discovered by
a fisherman in the Keen County Res-
ervoir southeast of Ashland.
The little boy was wearing mid-
dle-class clothing -- a red long-sleeve
shirt, gray corduroy pants, a cloth
diaper with blue diaper pins, and
“jumping jack” white shoes. He was
wrapped in a blanket and handmade
quilt.
Two heavy pieces of iron were
wrapped in the quilt to weigh the tod-
dler down in the water.
It was a case that drew a lot of atten-
tion at the time and investiga-
tors, many of them with their
own young children, worked
tirelessly to solve the case.
But the child was never iden-
tified. The little body was bur-
ied at Hillcrest Memorial Park
Cemetery in Medford.
The Jackson County Sher-
iff’s Office took over the case
and, for the next 58 years, 23 detec-
tives and deputies worked the case
with assistance from Oregon State
Police and the Federal Bureau of In-
vestigation.
The case was reopened in 2007, the
tiny body was exhumed and a
DNA sample was collected.
The National Center for
Missing and Exploited Chil-
dren created a composite
image in hopes of producing
some investigative leads.
The University of North Tex-
as Center for Human Identifi-
cation extracted a DNA pro-
file, which was uploaded into CODIS
(the Combined DNA Indexing Sys-
tem).
Still, there were no matching family
members in the system.
See ‘DNA’ on Page 3