The Times-herald. (Burns, Harney County, Or.) 1896-1929, February 07, 1914, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    r
i
r
CITY OF BURNS
tttlra-
COUNTY
OF HARNEY
ounty In The State
The Biggest City In The Biggest
The Biggest County
County In The State Of Oregon I
Of Oregon, Best In The West
VOL XXVII
BURNS, HARNEY COUNTY, OREGON, FEBRUARY 7, 1914
NO. 13
W
aW ' ,S
Mtmw.
- v
DISCUSS WATER WORKS
AND A SEWER SYSTEM
Representative of a Contracting Firm
Makes Persenal Investigation and
Gathers Information to Place Be
fore Bonding Houses. Must Have
Both Systems to Meet With Favor
The city council hold a special
meeting Tuesday evening for tee
purpose of consulting with I. Iv
Bufton. a representative of a
contracting firm with head quar
ters at Portland. Mr. Bufton
came here to look over the possi
bilities of installing a water and
sewer system in Burns and want
ed such data and information he
could secure to place before bond
ing houses to ascertain what
their attitude would he should ,
we decide to vote bonds for such I
purpose.
The Times-Herald understands
that bonding houses have not
points ami immediate action along
the line of voting bonds will de
pend to some extent upon how
his report is received by the
bonding houses.
Result of Public
School Examinations.
The following are the names
of those who received a grade of
80 per cent or more in one or
more subjects in the Eight
Grade examination just held:
Eight Grade, Burns Ray
Skions, Ed Goodman, James
Young. Elbert Taylor,
GROUP OF LAST WINTER'S "SHORT COURSERS" JUDGING HOGS.
LATEST DEVELOPMENT LEAGUE NOTES
I III I M lBJMBMSMBasJSJBJMSMMSJSBJSJSBasapWfli ' i-iay. 111 "fiTTEat'T ' ""gf' 'MIT1 11! !' "-H
T
i ' j ' attain iMiTMliftMBBM. Eaffl jIk
, m ill 1 ' bU II Wm-rill
fcA,A,rWMlL Jh & " in&far -4 fsrfst1 "ft JXffSSk" fife w I J'l' P
M HHsfll "sflsisSSSSSsl Efc ' L 8
H "' "99CwAflHMB ' - smBki iiiHiinttsA'sMTW' i Tffliwff ' AsVHHstfsPV
Stock judging is one of the interesting and practical features of the Agricultural Short Course to
be conducted in Burns the week of February 16-21 inclusive by instructors from the Agricultural Col
lege. Prof. Potter will be assisted in this work this year by E. B. Fitts, professor of dairying. The
r ,. i free use of stable room and hay at the fair grounds during the week makes itnttrnctive to farmers to
"""" I LJ ! . - -t- B .. J!
Oliver, Nellie Reed,
been very favorable to financing Kjchardson. Carmen
bonds of towns that have no rail
road connections in the recenl
past but there is a decided optim
ism shown recently and it is now
considered a favorable time to
bring such investments to their
attentions. With this in view it
was the desire of Mr. Bufton to
secure such information possible,
together with a personal Investi
gation and discussion with the
feeling of the people of Burns.
noting the character of the lu-i-ness
structures, the relationship
of the town to the commercial
interests of the country as.an in
dication of its permanency. The
gentleman remarked the substan
tial business bio ks, the modern
school building, the immense
volume of business of the two
banks and the general prosper
our condition of the commercial
business of the town and is fav
orably impressed. He will place
this information before bonding
houses for their consideration.
There are few, if any, property
owners in Bums but are in favor
of water and sewer provided in
adequate system may be installed
at reasonable cost. Howev r, it
is the opinion of many that we
should not attempt it unless both
may be installed at the same
time, as water works alone with
out the sewer would not bring in
revenue to justify the outlay and
assist in taking care of the inter
est on the bonds.
Mr. Bufton took his departure
Wednesday morning for outside
Henrietta
Donegan,
Ella
Jennie Cook, Ilda Hayes,
Elliott, Helen Thompson.
Seventh Grade, those receiving
K0 per cent and better in Physi Physi Physi
oeogy: Charles Cawlfield, Pat
Donegan, Ellsworth Egli, Ralph
McKinnon, Neil Miller, Alex
Sweek, Willis Skienes, Taylor
Huston, Celia Byrd, Agnes Foley
Violet Harkey, Rhea Rhine,
Francis McGee.
Sixth Grade, those receiving
per cent and better in Physi
olegy: --Everett Eggleston, Llew
ellyn Hibbard, Milton Brown,
Raymond Horton, Bernice Har
key, Georgia Fry, Gladys Mc
Kinnon, Hazel Hibbard, Leora
' ioodlow, Marie Egli, Mary Ows
ley, Margaret Seethoff, Ruby
Dickenson, Regina Schwartz,
Dorothy Sayer, Cora Shepard,
May Riggs.
District No. 42, Harriman
Florence Talbot, Belle Fitchett.
District No. 18, La wen Lulu
Hayes, Othel Gotf, Earl Sitz,
Allen Sitz.
District No. 41, Lawen Bertha
Carter.
District No. 21. Van-Greeta
Anderson.
District No. 2, Harney- Her
bert Irving, Susie Lowe, Lee
Clark, Lolo Howser, Leora Han
kins, Robert Lowe.
District No. 29-Emil Stone,
Nellie Huffman, Ethel Turner.
Hazel Turner.
Note -Returns from the ex
amination are not yet complete.
T - -
bring in stock for judging purposes. Those who contemplate bringing stock should notify J. C. Leedy
Things That Never Die. Box oars have been fixed up
here for a temporary depot and
(From the East Side Literary as soon as weather conditions
News, edited by Vivian Gray. ) settle down work will be started
The old year now reposes in the on the new stone depot,
past,
Embalmed are the remains which
could not last.
Hatred, deceit, treachery, envy
and shame.
Have marred its once untarnish
. ed name.
This was its body of useless waste
But its soul was progress its pas.' .
word haste,
Its motives were pure as an
angel's prayer.
Unselfish was its mission diligent
its care.
The kind deeds of the past year
will never die
The battles fought then now in
victory be
Could we but strive as this year
glides past,
To accomplish something that
will last.
on a harp Bub-
through the
THE BURNS HOTEL
DELL DIBBLE, Prop.
Centrally Located, Good Clean
Meals, Comfortable Rooms,
Clean and Sanitary Beds
First Class bar In Connection, (live Me A Call
THE WHITE FRONT
LIVERY, FEED AND SALE
STABLE
We have oonfined our business entirely to the
White Front where we are prepared to care
for our customers better than ever before
HORSES FED FOB 20c. PER HEAD AND UP
Baled Hay and Grata for Bale at Market
Price. Good Hay in Stack $4.50 Per Ton.
Delivered In Burns, $0.50 Per Ton
The Burns-Vale Stage Line
36-Hour Schedule from Kailroad
Clone Connections Made With Trains East
Cofortable Conveyances for Prssengers.
Fare, $10. Careful Attention and Prompt
Delivery of Kxpresa and Freigha Entrust
ed to Our Care. Freight 2 l-2c. Per Pound.
R. J. McKinnon & Son
BURNS, - OREGON
One pure breath
lime
Will live to echo
years of time.
Some battle with self will uplift
the race
And prepare us to meet the
Master face to face.
P. II. Gray now residing in
Crane Creek (Jnp met with a
painful accident one day last
week by slipping on the ice and
falling on a bucket which he was
carrying at the time, a broken
rib was the result. He was do
ing as nicely as could be expected
until two days later when the
house caught fire at the roof and
Daddy regardless of broken
bones climbed on top of the house
with a pail of water. With the
help of Mrs, Gray and Ira Clark
who was hailed while passing,
the (lames were extinguished.
Since that time Mr. Gray's con
dition has been more serious.
Dr. Denman was called and gave
what relief possible.
Ralph J. Rimer our Pleasant
Valley school teacher Is casting
about for a location intending to
make our country his permanent
home. Having wandered away
from the East and crossed the
continent because as he express
ed ' 'there seemed to be nothing
there to stay for" he has been
agreeably surprised at the wait
ing opportunities of our country
and the progcssive spirit of its
people.
Railroad Prospects Brighter.
t ,
Judging from present indica
tions and current rumors, rail
road operations will be resumed
with vigor as soon as weather
conditions permit, and an effort
will be made to push the steel
through to Riverside at an early
date.
L. C. McCoy, the engineer in
charge of the construction work,
thinks that they will be able to
get to Riverside by the first of
AuguBt, if not sooner, as they
will shoo tly the crossings be
tween here and that point and
afterwards put in permanent
bridges, as they done between
Juntura and the tunnel last
summer.
There has been an element of
good fortune in the past cold
spell for the bridge crews below
here, as the freezing weather
checked the water from flowing
off too fast and taking out the
false works and coffer dams
built in the river channel. If we
have any amount of cool weather
for the next month, the snow
will go off slowly and will not
Market Report.
Receipts for the week have
been Cattle-748, Calves-15, Hogs
5243, Sheep-6243.
Cattle liquidation has been ex
tremely light this week and busi
ness not very brisk. Packers are
showing a preference for prime
hay and grain-fed steers weigh
ing from 1060 to 1800 pounds.
Of course, this variety is com-
paratively scarce and most of the
transactions are in medium and
heavy bullocks. Reef outlet is
narrow. Decreased receipts have
cause floods and the consequent undoubtedly had a sobering effect
damage to the temporary bridges.
Work on the bridges is being
pushed by the new management
and it is hoped to get the steel
all in without any delay on ac
count of floods.
We expect to hear of building
operations at Riverside just as
soon as the boosters of that little
townlet are assured that the steel
will get in there this year, and
on prices, but trade is not active
f.i yet. A few good butcher ca: -lie
were sold during the week,
but the market was slow. Bulk
prices were as follews: Prime
steers, $7.26 to $7.60; prime cows
$0.25 to $0.00; Heifers. $6.50 to
$6.75; Calves, $8.00 to $9.00;
Bulls, $5.50 to $5.75.
Swine prices climed to $8.15
Thursday as receipts have been
win ue K.au to see maiourg grow vcry Bmal, 8ince Monday when
as it is better to have the country J the 8econd largC8l run of tneyear
developed and towns built than ' urrivcdi Buying was brisk all
to have expanses of sage brush weok and price8 maintained a
from which to draw trade. 1 8lronR fronL Bulk of choice
Every new settler that comes to ; liKht noga brought $8.00 to $8.05,
this section of Malheur county is1 but occasional 8ae8 were made
just another booster for this sec- ... , ... w ir i)mB,i MmH
tion, and if the road wasn't built
on and towns were not developed,
the settler wouldn't be here and
we wouldn't get the benefit of
his presence nor would we get
the country developed and put in
a productive condition. -Juntura
Times.
Moit Profitable Age and
Types of Beef Cattle.
Successful livestock growers as
well as dealers in livestock and
meats, must know the market
demands and then grow animals
that will meet them. This is the
cardinal principle of the industry
as announced by Mr. Forestel,
expert buyer for the Union Meat
Company, in his livestock de
monstration before the Oregon
Agricultural College Short Course
Students. Farmers that raise
livestock for beef and pork, often
aim at the production of animals
as big and as fat as they can be
made. When those farmers take
the 1 nek to the markets they are
disappointed and often angry be
cause it brings less per pound
than the smaller animals. Beef
animals are sold with the highest
margin of profit at from one to
two years of age. A grower
recently Bold a yearling steer in
the city market for $06 at the
same time that another grower
sold a two-year old for $117.
There is no profit at all is car.y
ing be f animals after they are
two or three years old.
It was further pointed out that
types should be developed that
carry high percentages in the
choice parts of the carcass.
Everybody wants porterhouse
steak and prime ribs, and these
cuts must bear the loss of the
chuck, which is about 42 per cent
of the dressed beef. And then
people wonder why beef is so
high. Hut growers will profit by
knowing the facts, if they choose
their beef types accordingly.
Ci mi Mm' I'lirtlnml Correspondent;
What is expected to be the
most important session of the
Oregon Irrigation Congress ever
h 'ill will be called to order at the
i Imperial Hotel in Portlrnd on
I February 13 and will last for two
i days. It is expected that fully
200 men. representing all sec
tions of the state, will be in at
tendance. About 40 organiza
tions of water-users, ditch own
ers and commercial bodies ntw
belong to the congress and each
is expected to send five delegates,'
William Hanley, president of
the congress, has announced that
one of the most important pro
blems to come before the busi
ness session at that time wiil be:
"How too Finance the Individual
Projects in Different Locations
and Give the Owners the Right
to Install their own Irrigation
Plants." It will be contended
that each municipality or project
shall have the right to make its
own rules and regulations in the
same way that a private cor
poration handles its own affairs.
On the night of Feb. 14 a ban
quet will be given to the visiting
delegates at the Imperial Hotel
in celebration of the effective
work done by the congress since
the last session.
Equipped with stock from the
Oregon Agricultural College, car
rying expert instructors from
that institution and also a number
of farmers who have proven that
hog raising and dairying are
profitable pursuits in Oregon,
the Southern Pacific demonstra
tion train will start from Inde
pendence on the morning of Feb.
2, concluding its trip at Albany
on the 14th, in the meantime
having passed over all S. P. and
P. E. & E. lines. Arrangemen's
have been made for two lectures
with demonstrations at every
stop. This train is intended to
take the advantages of the Col
lege direct to the barn door of
the farm and stands for prac
tical farm education.
ARMS EMBARGO TO BE
LIFTED BY PRESIDENT
Wilton Preparing Executive Order to
Permit Importation of Arms Into
Mexico by Both Sides in Revolu
tionary Struggle. An Anti-Foreign
Uprising to be Guarded Against
A late Washington dispatch
says: That President Wilson
was preparing an executive order
raising the embargo on the trans
fer of arms and ammunition from
the United States across the bor
der into Mexico, was persistently
reported, though without confir
mation, today.
Despite the fact that the re
port was unconfirmed and that
neither at the White House nor
at the state department was any
one found who would discuss it.
there was high authority to the
effect that the story was true
and that the order would be issued
tomorrow.
from
coast.
the former place to the
Identify the Insect
Then Apply the Spray.
Sprays should not be applied
to plants to rid them of insects
until it is definitely known that
the insects are harmful. The
mere fact that they are present
in considerable numbers is not
sufficient warrant for Spraying.
they may be harmful, but again
they may be either rw utral or
beneficial. If they are injurious,
they should be combatted, but if
tlicv lire ln'iwif 'wifi 1 )li,. .jI.'.mI.I
It was understood also that the be encouraged, since it is definite
ly known that the destruction ot
the natural enimies of harmful
insects has done much to increase
the number of harmful pests.
"Begin the work of control
by carefully studying the insect, "
says Professor H. F. Wilson, en-
cabinet had discussed the em
bargo question. Secretary of
State Bryan and Secretary of
War Garrison would say nothing,
but apparently were aware that
some new move was about to be
made in the Mexican situation.
Advices to Bryon indicated that i tomologist in the Oregon Agri
President Huerta was becoming cultural Colleire. "If you can
desperate and the state depart- identify the insect, and it is
ment was momentarily expecting ' harmful, then apply the standard
news of Ton eon's capture by the; spray according to directions.
If you cannot identify it, then
rebels
Orders to Admiral Fletcher
were believed to have been issued
this afternoon for the American
warships at Vera Cruz to be
ready for any emergency.
It was plain that a serious
a n t i - Amei icin demonstration
was looked for in Mexico City
with the h flint nf th.' imli'irir
Believing that alfalfa growing on .,, which M the
is of vast importance, not only , afternoon progressed, was tacity
to the livestock interests of the admitted to be on the program
The bustle about the navy de-
to be brisk and to dale has taken
care of the supply.
The sheephouse experienced a
temporary slump this week, as
killers drew off unexpectedly,
and mutton and lamb sellers had
considerable difficulty in dispos
ing of their stock, especially if
quality of sheep and lambs grad
ed less than prime. Wethers
were unsteady and about 15
cents lower. Ewes fell a quarter
and lambs an equal amount the
early part of the week. A few
top sales were made Monday at
the same level which ruled here
ten days since, but business was
draggy thereafter. Bulk prices
on Friday were; Prime yearl
ings, $5.00 to $6.86; Prime ewes,
$1.50 to $4.75; Prime grain-fed
lambs, $6.50 to $6.75. Poor
quality mutton hard to move at
any price.
Hw .. Your BoiUr?
It has been stated that a man's
stomach is his boiler, his body is
his engine and his mouth the fire
box. (s yoqr boiler (stomach)
in good working order or is it bo
weak that it will not stand a full
load and not able to supply the
needed energy to your engine
(body)? If you have any trou
ble with your stomach Chamber
lain's Tablets will do you good.
They strengthen and invigorate
the stomach and enable it to do
its work naturally. Many very
remarkable cures of stomach
trouble have been effected by
them. For sale by all dealers.
Estrayod One red and white
muley cow branded a script fig
ure four or an oar lock on right
Bide came to my place in Drewsey
(.bout three weeks ago. Owner
please come prove property, and
pay charges and for this adv.
P. J. UPfen.
Tonawama tonight
state, but also in its relation to
the up-building and maintenance
of soil fertility, the State Sup
erintendent of Public Instruction
has set aside the entire second
week of March as "Alfalfa
Week." Every school in Oregon,
including the one-room country
schools, will be expected to place
special emphasis on the subject
of alfalfa. In the lower tirades
this instruction will be in the
form of story-telling by the
teacher and comments and ques
tions by the pupils. In the upper
grades, all the written composi
tion of the classes will be on the
subject of alfalfa and its relation
to other industries.
The "Passion Play"
For Farmers Week
Tonawama management has
secured the three-reel feature the
"Passion Play" for the Agri
cultural Short Course week.
These pictures will be seen on
the evening of Feb. 18 and it is
the intention to secure the ser
vices of Dr. Benson, pastor of
the First Presbyterian church, to
lecture during the production.
The two evangelists, Revs. Lewis
and Matthews, who will be here
at that time assisting in the re
vival services, will also be asked
to render vocal solos between the
reels. This feature has been
secured by the management at a
price that will permit the pro
duction at the regular feature
prices of the house.
Upon first being advised of
the date of the short course
Tonawama management begun
to figure on some good pictures
for the farmer visitors and later
learning of the revival meetings
it was decided to secure a feature
that would fit in well with all
concerned.
Two shows will be given that
evening, thus making it possible
to seat all who may desire to Bee
the "Passion Play." This pic
ture of the life of Jesus Christ is
one of the most instructive and
interesting ever placed on a
Bcrene.
partment indicated that prepara
tions were being made for excit
ing developments in the very
near future.
Admiral Fletcher, it was said,
had plenty of marines at his com
mand and undoubtedly could pro
tect the railroad between Mexico
City and Vera Cruz and cover
the escape of foreign colonists
note the effect it has on the
plant. If the plant shows signs
of insect feeding, the visitors
that cause them are eating in
sects and can be controlled by
arsenical sprays. If the plant
shows curled leaves, wilted sur
face, creasing, uneven and dis
colored tissues but no nibbled
areas, the visitors are sucking
insects and can be controlled by
contact insecticides. But of the
plant shows no signs of damage
the visitors are probably either
neutral, or predacious insects in
search of harmful insects that
they feed upon. The plant often
shelters the hunter as well as the
game."
Finest alfalfa, timothy and red
top hay baled may he had at the
Goodman feed barn is south Burns
Dr. Geo, G, Carl Is prepared
for special attention to all dis
eases of eye, ear and nose. Eyes
tested and glasses fitted. 60tf .
THE FRENCH HOTEL
DAVID NEWMAN, Prop.
Strictly First Class. Splendid
Service, Fine Accomodations,
Commercial Headquarters
Sample Room In Connection, Reasonable Rates
BLUE MT. STAGE CO.
Daily Line, Burns and Prairie City
8CHEDULE:
LEAVE AKKIVK
Burn 6mm Canyon City ti:'ii) i in
Canyon City 7am Prairie City 10 am
Prairie City 2:30 p ni
Canyon City 7 pm Burn .., 12 noon
Fare, Burns-Prairie City, - - $ 6.00
Round Trip, ... - u.oo
Express Rates 2 1-2 Cents, Irairie to Hums
PLEASANT, SCENIC ROUTE ALL THE WA Y
L. WOLDENBERC.sProp.
THE
WELCOME PHARMACY
la The Place to Trade
-WHY-
First: Promptness, accuracy and fair dealing.
Secend: Wo carry a well assorted stock of Drugs, Chemi
cals and Druggist Sundriei.
Third: We guarantee every article we sell to be just as
represented or your money refunded.
If you are a customer of ours you know this. If not, be
come one and be convinced.
J. C. Welcome. Jr.