The Times-herald. (Burns, Harney County, Or.) 1896-1929, December 30, 1911, Image 2

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    (p
WE GUARANTEE- WE GUARANTEE-
til Ubrlet tued ty ot tobntrlctlx lextTtryortMwlih prompt
al) wool, ol rojxrlor Tloe ed of om n4 to taiail ettry teqslr
UltlnrqntlltT. wtntoloiir ei tint
WE GUARANTEE- WE GUARANTEE-
tht trlmmlBfttobc lottrlrt nU 'ir vorkm.ftiMp to I th Ut
bllltroflberalertilui ii.nlnid Ubor rn prodnw
WE GUARANTEE-
to ttt Uek t,.rh rlotlm m.e i.y 7VlA ClottlCS With US
at thai lll to ri" nl, " - -
(action
SCHENK & WILLIAMS
MERCHANT TAILORS AND OUTFITTERS
Burns, Oregon, Odd Fellows Bldg.
CLEANING AND PRESSING
J
She $iwcs-glcrato.
JULIA- V- I - - Wtr
t. TURP t. BECEMBER 3. IMI
P ORIFTION KATES-
Ose Tir
Mx MonUn
Three Monthi
n.00
.I.M
.X
The Times-Herald hopes the
proposition of water works and
sewerage will command the at
tention of the property owners of
Bums and that immediate steps
be taken toward the new charter
with provision for bonding for
such purpose. The report of
Engineers Cooper & Dodge is
now before them and is compre
hensive with a great deal of cor
respondence that will bear out
their estimates as well as show
what systems have proven most
satisfactory. Let's get busy.
The Blue ML Eagle insists it
is not knocking Harney county
but merely stating facts not only
of this section but all over East
ern and Central Oregon when it
refers to the big land holdings.
We admit the big land men and
that they have the best watered
area throughout the territory,
but not all the most desirable
land by any means. These hold
ings will have to be cut up and
the men who hold them are not
averse to have them so disposed
of. With the coming of trans
portation will come greater de
velopment, irrigation projects
that will properly distribute the
water, thus covering a much
larger area.
Two peddlers were arrested at
Burns for having beaver hides in
their possession. They demurred
to the complaint and were dis
charged on the ground that thelaw
did not say anything about hides,
but made it unlawful for a per
son to have beaver in their poss
ession. The purpose of the law
is not to incite quibbling by law
yers and drivelings by courts,
but prevent the destruction of
beaver. With the course of rea
soning pursued, even though a
man was caught red handed skin
ning a beaver he could not be
found guilty because that law
does not say any thing about dead
beaver. If a trapper caught a
beaver that had an eye and a
game warden caught the trapper
there would be nothing stirring
because the law does not say any
thing about having one eyed
beaver in possession, or again a
man could set up the defense of
sick beaver and as the law does
not say anything about sick bea
ver there would be no crime com
mitted. And by analogy if the
law made it a crime to have the
hide in possession all a trapper
would have to do would be to
tuck the whole carcass under his
arm and he could not be convict
ed because the law did not have
anything to say about beavers
with the hides on. No wonder it
takes three years to get through
a law school. Blue Mt. Eagle.
was accompanied on the trip by
Lee Finch and states they had
some trouble with deep snow
over the mountain but aside from
that the auto skipped right
along.
Dr. Marsden returned from the
scene Monday evening and
brought the first authentic re
port of the shooting. Taylor and
Perry had been working together
sinking artesian wells for Mr.
Carlson. Mr. Taylor is an ex
perienced man at the business
and it seems Perry had been sug
gesting that the methods be
changed or a well sunk at a dif
ferent place, at any rate the
shooting was in the evening
after they had quit work. Taylor
coming into the room remarking
that he did not approve of men
without experience giving him
instructions. Perry at once took
it up and Lou Bosenburg, who is
cooking at the ranch, entered
into the conversation saying that
Perry had not been giving Tay
a square deal. Perry became
very angry and told them he
could whip a house full of Bosen
bergs and Taylors. He kept up
his abuse and followed Bosen
berg around to the kitchen, la
ter returning and taking up the
quarrel with Taylor who was on
a bed in a corner of the room.
Perry kept advancing toward
Taylor who warned him to keep
away or he would hurt him, but
as he countinued advancing in a
threathening manner Taylor shot
him with a 45-caliber revolver,
the bullet passing through him
and entered Robt. Settlemyre
who was sitting on the other
side of the fire place. Perry lived
for eleven hours after he was
shot He was a powerful man
about twenty-five years old and
had the reputation of being a
fighter. Taylor is a man sixty
years old.
As stated in our last issue, Mr.
Settlemyre was an innocent party
stopping there for the night,
having a blooded horse which he
hoped to dispose of. Dr. Mars
den found Mr. Settlemyre in a
bad condition and held out but
little hopes for his recovery. He
was buried there. Deceased had
relatives in Kansas.
Taylot has not yet had a pre
liminary hearing as Justice
O'Connor was called to Winne
muccaas a witness in another
murder case that had occurred
just over the line in Nevada.
The Andrews shooting was wit
nessed by Mr. Carlson and Geo.
Sebring, Bosenberg being in the
house but not an eye witness.
These will be brought to Burns
perhaps next week when a hear
will be had.
WOULD HELP ALL AROUND.
SECOND VICTIM DIES.
Robt. Settlemyre died at the
Carlson ranch, near Andrews,
last Tuesday morning from the
bullet fired by Jack Taylor on
Thursday of last week which
killed Alfred II. Perry.
Sheriff Richarsdson left here
on Tuesday morning to bring
Taylor here, the latter having
zone to Denio after the shooting
and submitted to arrest, later
returning to the Carlson ranch
in.company with Justice O'Con
nor and V. Defenbaugh, the con
stable. Later the prisoner was
turned over to Deputy Sheriff
Mooro who held him until the ar
rival of the sheriff. Mr. Rich
ardson arrived home with the
prisoner yesterday evening. He
It would be a great thing if
Portland business men could
reach by letter their customers
in the Harney Valley and along
the route from Bend to Burns
within twenty-four hours. This
will come with the completion of
the cross-state railway. It may
come before then. An effort is
now in progress to establish a
daily mail service between Bend
and Burns and the ambition at
each terminus and along the
route is to make it an auto ser
vice. The importance of the
plan rests not altogether in the
immediate advantages that would
accrue to present settlers and
distributors of merchandise. A
daily mail service would be a
strong incentive toward rapid
settlement along this 150 miles
of almost undeveloped country.
Its ultimate result would be in
creased business, greater produc
tion and these in turn would
hasten railroad building. Any
influence that Portland and its
commercial bodies can give to
bring about this mail service
would be well worth their while.
WATER
. , t. -..-!- un..!f.n Miller, hlect
vn ccucp :tfm;. several species oi uacu.ua -- -.. . t..i. in-
"' " J i fin? nn.l the accclleraf- ler, waraer, ... , , s
el; Louel Smith. innpimn. -..
(Continued frontpage 1)
located on the low land east of
the city, with a stand pipe on the
hill northwest of the city, using
either cast iron pipe or machine
banded wood stave pipe for the
distributing system."
Very complete details submit-
t d in resiect to tho water sys-
becn confined and the accclleraf-
ied process made a success in
'many sewage disposal plants,
large and small, raiiures are
flnlv examples of poor design or
the imposition of abnormal con
ditions."
The report further states re
specting the disposal of sewage
or location of the tank:
"As the fall from the south-
,r Electa, Juan.U M.t y M V tti W ?? lM7 lJ
j,r Julian Byrd. Sonti ;,.' v
79.010.10
terns which we do not consider cast portion of Burns to the
niwasnrv to emote. The lienor-1 river is slight, we have provided
I for a pumping plant to raise tne
sewage from the dosing tank to a
level with the filters, a lift of six
to ten feet, with a view of plac
ing filters out of reach of high
water. An inundation occasion
ally will not damage the filters,
but a flood of considerable dura
tion would tend to clog the beds,
and to destroy the bacteria.
Another reason for raising the
sewage is to avoid a submerged
outlet"
In closing the report the engi
neers state they have a great
deal of correspondence of file
which covers almost every item
in the report and that this corre
spondence is open to inspection
by the city authorities at any
time.
Tho summary of the combined
water works and sewer system
show the following figures:
SjrMcin pumuj; from ell
uii cast iron pit.- for
distributing system 73.U10.10
AtUl 10 percent foreiigtRfer-
injc and incidentals $ 7,901.01
Sewer ijrstem complete - 3S.47S S7
Add 10 per cent for etif;iueer-
inj; and iuculentuls - - - 3,547 S'J
al summary:
GKNKRAL SUMMARY.
Gravity System using ma
chine banded wood state
pipe for pipe Hue. ami cast
iron pipe l,w distributing
system $110,680.40
Gravity system using ma
chine banded wood stave
pipe for pipe line ami same
pipe for distributing srs
tern ....... 7
MaintenancegrHvity system
per year 500.00
System pumping from veils
tisinft cst iron pipe for
distributing system $ 00.41 COO
System pnmptng from wells
using machine banded
wood stioc pipe for dis
tributing system - - 37.MJ5.70
Maintenance system pump
ing from wells per year 1,970.00
SEWER SYSTEM.
The report recommends
the
septic tank system in preference
to the broad irrigation, these be
ing the only practical manner
of disposal of sewage, as Sil
vies River, the only other method
of disposal by dilution could not
be used for such purpose.
The description of the septic
tank system is interesting and
The Times-Herald would like to
devote sufficient space to give it
in full, but lack of space prevents
The estimate is made covering a
tank 75 feet long, 30 feet wide
and 5 feet deep, built of concrete
with concrete partition dividing
into two compartments, one for
septic tank and one for dosing
chamber, the entire plant includ
ing filter beds to cover an area
of not more than one and one-half
acres and the cost is estimated
at $35,-173.S7.
In describing the septic tank
and Alteration process the report
says in part:
"Under this method the sew
age collected in a tank holding
from four to twelve hours flow
of sewage. This tank is in con
tinuous operation, sewage being
admitted at one end and dis
charged over a weir at the other.
The effluent from the septic tank
is collected in a dosing tank, in
practically liquid form. The
dosing tank is provided with a
siphon or pump for flushing rap
idly onto a filter bed of crushed
rock or gravel and sand, and
from the filters the purified sew
age discharges through a simple
system of sub-drains.
"This arrangement permits of
an accellerated, natural process
of purification by the action of
bacteria. Under proper condi
tions these agents act as certain
ly as milk sours, or vinegar
works, or wine ferments. The
Total for both systems, us
ing cast iron pipe for dis
tributing water - Sl25.U37.h7
System pumping from wells
using machine banded
wood staveptpe tor distri
buting $ 37,825.70
Add 10 per centfo'engineer
ir.g and incidentals - 3,72 57
Sewer system complete - 35.47H.b7
Add 10 percent for engineer
ing an incidentals - 3,647.SS
Totalfur both systems using
machine banded w ood
stave pipe fur distributing
water J S0.635 00
.VUSO.MC INSTALLATION
The usual joint installation of
officers by the Masons and East
ern Star was held at their hall
last Wednesday evening and
proved a very enjoyable affair.
Only Masons and their wives and
Eastern Stars and their husbands
were present making it a nice
sized crowd of congenial com
pany numbering about seventy.
Mrs. Julian Byrd was installing
officer for the Stir with Mrs. W.
L. Marsden as marshal. The
officers installed were: Frankie
Welcome, Worthy Matron r Win
A. Gowan, Worthy Patron; Ag
nes aayer. Associate .Matren:
Ella Sweek, Secretary; Cassie
Smyth, Treasurer; Lizzie Dalton,
Conductress. Emma Gowan, As
sociate Conductress; Iona
Thompson, Adah; Eva Byrd.
Ruth, Cordia Laurence, Esther;
Ella Mothershead, Martha; Mat-
AUTOMOBILES
Eight hours to Bend over the fastest and best roads in Ore
gon. All winter service. Daily schedule in the near future.
ONE DAY SAVED
Lowest rates to Portland, Puget Sound and Eastern points.
,FK ARCHIE M'GOWAN Early abonl jour Transportation.
AT COST
at the
WELCOME PHARMACY
all articles on the counter
running through the cen
ter of our store. Buy a
A Real Bargain
J. C. WELCOME, Jr., Prop.
nil
.iv., . !j
Farre. urgamsi. ,-
Sam Mothershead. 1 M.. m-
stalled the Masonic oflicors as-,
isted by Tom Allen as Mnrslml. -(i
Results Count-.
por the liberal patronage we
have received during your. 1911
V1; li.XTIsN!) Ol'K THANKS
The pnst year's business far
exceeds imy previous year In
our business history.
I
T
HEREBUSTBEig
MH
NotHstliictioninnsJTj
ed alike lkstg0oil "
wens uisasoNj2
Wo have omet,n gi
after stock Inking JIB
you to call early nttcrjjj
He turned tne insianuw -
uceover to Worshipful Master .
Miller after installing the three
principal oilkers. Tho? inaUHwl
were: Worshipful Master. W m
Miller; Senior Warden. J. I- ,
Gault; Junior Warden. Win A.
Gowan; Secretary. Sam Mothers- ?
hid; Treasurer. J. C. Welcome.
Sr. . Senior Deacon. L udwig John- vi.
son; Junior Deacon. Irving Ml- 5
M2rV'I During jam,ar,,-Felmtr Doubly Trnihdi
Hansen; lyier. Alien .io"-"-
A tine banquet followed the in- yt
stallation ceremonies and a gon-
era! good time in n social vr
Two vocal selections were reini-
ered during the evening by Me- -
dames Farre and Mcllcwe.
ITEMS FROM W.t VtM.
io new school house was far a
igh completed to hok! the ,
me
pnniii'h comnl
Christmas celebration which w.us S
. r A- r"t .... a.M.k "
a high success, santa w mu c - ,
u.m nvor tho trot? to the delight S
' a i i 1 1 jc - m m um a re-
mrjm Mjcm m mm m
KE3.M&m tei
mJjjP1 WRNS. OREii
SI)
of the children. GO or more poo- J. iMVtW LiS HW?lKVXlWitfrX Y$aJ
pie attended, everyone received f Ix 1
A turkey and chicken -
. - .! iM)fi j. it'aestssBsjjJ
E. B. REED & Si
Corn a full line of
FANCV AND STAPLE
6om latv arrival an
a present.
dinner was served and everyone in. ,.. ..... mut Ik-
went home with a contented look ; A I wwunb, dm u mu
on their face. Mr. Breithaupt P e.tho , cash or m gl
of the Experimental Station w eJuLcty by
a welcome visitor and received a '".j,, l)0 j ,n ,he
warm welcome. Come again. X.MJoy for lmMl,.
Mrs. Alfred Whitney's two - Ilt0 colljotion. I am forced to do
children are recovering from the jj in imjor t0 mwi iny oblign-
Dukes disease. .:., (,, V. CU'.VKNOKK.
Mr. Will Welty has been quite
sick but is on the road to recov
ery. Mrs. Heffeditz returned home
on Christmas eve from Burns
where she has been for the lust
two weeks nursing her sick
daughter.
The severe wind storm of the
night of the 22nd passed without
as much damage as susiiected.
We were rather surprised to find
ourselves right side up with care
the next morning we imagined
the storm to be worse than it
really was.
Our new neighbors Mr. and
Mrs. Wilson and daughter Viola
were heartily welcomed among u
on Christmas.
Mr. Alfred Whitney baa re
turned home from the Experi
mental Station.
A dedication service will be
held in the new school house on
Dec. 31st at 3 p. m. The service
will be conducted by the Rev.
Mr. Holloman. there will be spe
cial music.
Sunday School as usual at 2 p.
m. every Sunday. All are in
vited. Reatos for -male, all sizes and
engths, price 20 cents per foot.
Any one desiring Reatos address
W. A. Ford of J. 0. Alberson.
lberson. Oregon.
UlMIMSTKWVIV MIIICI!.
Notice is hereby given tlmt the
undersigned 1ms been duly n- '
pointed administratrix of tlw es
tate of Charles Williams, deceas
ed. All iiersons liaving claims
against said estate re hreby
required to present the same to
me, proiwrly verified Rt Kdey.
Oregon, within six months from
the tittle thereof.
Dnted this 23rd day of December.
1911.
Ht.iZAHBTit Thorn.
Aminislrstrix.
NOTICK FOR PUBLICATION
lITBmTBiH..!Dorr!i t '
ami, Onto. IwnrailMf 1. 11 1 I
.ol I, fctnt fiv tfc Mf V o
o Bark, uraaoa wto M trnttmrnW i
in a H..4 BU, llfc. ta
itortlu XL . K-. MIIOM
rtt. MnWu. k llwt Mlio UlMtltoa i
fll tMumuttoa ttaot, b xiakiuti
rlttai U. tW U4 tlun 4wllM, Wfata '
KvstaOT nJ IU.lfr. kl (. oioo . u
lk Mk .tr JfT. I'"
C llllatnt u-. ollx.il
HroMn JokMa, I. M McHktll iiiu.
M MliMu4tlnli MIIM lll X-fb
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION. J
flum. Orvfoa tHrmtmt M, t I
AfMlttiu, uf MrKos.i iiu. wU
lulf 4. 110 ttift'U NosMii'1 fultj . 4V l
K, m t) )(! MfMln h A fl t Hum
Jfttlloti m lf Ha J wwMu'iih f. (''
Ui stbtih rkaln lo lie il Uii J in i
u lur ih lUirWrr hn4 Nitr t l.i i
ttfrf 'tx uu ttir JWb dy l Jaruf i i,
' Uttnttit nm w)m
UlK'W Ki'tnonl klli MltrUr I.- . i
It Mri'hul li i.l i irhsmn t,o J t
H -r t Huriis Ofguii
TKA GAIIOKX MlXCi: MK,iTIw
HVI.K OUVKS. IWI.K S HHT PICtuKt
swiiirr (urn, nm
1)11.1. rtCKLKS.
CHKKSK, COCOA iWTS. CltlMIFJtHtH
MAS COXFKCTIONS, OltWGKS. IJX$l
Prices The Lowest For lljjjh jntS
f. 'rW. V. 5.', tT 3WS.S9' w
.:
! k,(i.'
YOU
ARE
VmVttiMW&VtJWtXltMtVttWim!ll
CANDY KI1CHEN-.
No Ixx-attd Next Door North of the French llolel
Wanted -A girl for general
housework. See Mrs. McIIose. '
jt
irKtokyyww ir itntMigi&i
NEW AND FKI3II LINE OF Cllk'lSTMAS CONFECTIONS AND BOXLS
Alixed Nuts, Dates, Candies, Home Made
lioarhound, Candy Boxes half to three pounds
Your Christmas Patronage Solicited.
Satisfaction (juaranteed
T
5
"A
0. A. C. SHORT COURSES
llrKlnJan. X Continur KOI 11 IIKKS
Every citizen of Oregon is cordi.il!) invited to at
tend the short courses of the Oregon Agricultural
College, beginning Jan. 3. Kleven dihtinrtiu
courses will be ofrerel in Agriculture, Median u
Arts, Domestic Science and Art, Commerce. For
estry and Music. Every course is designi-d t.
HELP tho student in his daily work. Make thi
IWVITpnia pleasant and profitable winter outing. No in
111 T 1 1 liU Rion. Reasonable accommodations. For !x-auti
ful illustrated bulletin, address
II. M. TENNANT, Registrar. Corvalhs. Or.-
l-ariner's lluslncs Omrsc l Ciirrnpondcrue
fit
ou
TO
HV llnvv Opened Oilier in the .V2j
lluildinu in llnrnn, it ml an h
IC
Furnish Accurate,
and Complete Abslni
Title to all Lands in HarftE
Buy and Sell RealEa
Lare and Small Tra.
TO
I
rite hire Insurances
Strongest Old UneCtw
8,000 acre tract irrijeatedg
be-t in Central Oren-p1
i i j , ni
ciass colon i.aiion projw.p
Ml
ff
una
II m
if-
llttsitWHH Int runt etl To Ui
Prompt unit Cart ful Atlcnikfi
MOTHERSHEAD& d
Rooms I and 5 Masonic llurfi
CLOSING OUT
AT ACTUAL j
I In i.h .. .iulu.ii-, F.innintr Macliuii r , WaB'&.(
I'.uil.lmj.' iii.ih n. llarilwnri. I'aintx Oik GU
war.-. Ciai.Tv. (Jrwi-riui, SIkhw, tifii'- FurnUl,
ami RidinU j
I'RICES THAT WILL IMY YOU 10
iTIu-sc jnmmN mu t be moved at onro
in ll.iriu-) i'..ij,ty.
.1
al FS
K
V? .BEk Vr
Short and Direct Route to Portland and
Other Western Oregon Points
ri
i pl'Lnn Joints Meat Market S
i-'viiUj liuuiUUUU
and
Central Oregon
via (lie Deschutes Branch of (he
Oregon-Washington Railroad S Navigation Co.
Through Car Service between Rend and I'rtaMI
" t I I. M II I HI I.l.
I.v II. ml i ,0 ,.
I.y, UoJuiuii.I 7 81A.M.
I,v. 0.l City 8.00 A. .M.
I.V MeUilliw 8:!CiA.
I.v. Mailrni 0:WA. M.
Ar. Deocliulen Jt; I :r I'. M
Ar. The DmIIm :Hf, I', j,
Ar. Portland IlilSI. J.
0-11 "" uu "w N- AK"l 'r ii.f..r,..lUH ,jir.1
WM. MeMUlUlA Y
(.INIIIU lA--i M, . ,s,
I'OIUJ AM), ulil.ii",
l-v l-uillunil
I.v. 'lUlhilU,
U. HvmUiiIm Jr.
Ar. MmlrM
Ar,M4liM.. . .
Ar, 0wtmtjr .
Ar IMiuuihI
Ar. Iltnnl ..
I V A l
I in Ui A
1 1 10 I. M
i au i'
'. 16 I1
11 0J
I. W I
7 ', I'
K V, V
or ail rt.
IO
Burns IVIeat Wla
II. J. IIANSHN, lrprhtor
Heel", Pork, Veal, M
Sausage, Bologna, If
Headcheese, WientfJ
;,l"l''TilliiiiK' in u lli'hl d.i-4 M(,,,t J
"N IIHllll U
Wholesale and m
Prompt and Satisfactory
Anv and all the time.