The Bend bulletin. (Bend, Or.) 1903-1931, February 16, 1922, WEEKLY EDITION, Image 1

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    WEEKLY EDITION
The bend
1 4
71k
BULLETIN.
VOli. XIX
BEND MILL MEN
REFUTE TRADE
REPORTCHARGE
PINE MANUFACTURERS
GIVE STATEMENT
PRICK FIXING DENIED
AWnlrrii I'ltio .Mamifuetnrerri ,t
elation I'ln n No I'urt In lletrr.
iiiIiiImk Market, llerliirrit lly
It, ). TijIor nml II. K. Allen
(11 Unit! IVr. toTt.. IUnt llull.lln.)
WASHINGTON, Ki.1i. 15. TJio
federal Iriulu coininlinlon. In IU ro
port to congress today charged nc
1 1 vit cooperation lo ninliitiiln IiiiiiIjlt
prices by tlin Western l'luu Manufac
turers nmoclatlon, the Went C(innt
ItUmborniuim' nimorlatlou and pro
ducers of pi no In California.
ii.ii(ii3 ii:mi:i)
POltTLANI), Fob, lC.A.
Cooper, ecrotnry-manager of
W.
Ilio
Western Pino .MnmifncturarH assocla
lion iiiikIu u sweeping denial today
of charges tnnilii liy ilia federal trnilii
commlwtlon. JIu refused to go Into
u ilatalloil donliil.
Direct itatilnlH of tho federal trailo
commission's statement charging co
' operation to mitlnliilii lumber prices
were m into Wednesday by II. 12.
Allen nml I.. 0. Taylor, rospccllva
assistant general manager of tho
Jlruoks-Hcnnlon Lumber Co. nml Tho
Shovllu-lllxon Coinpuny. Hothcom
panlvs nra members of tho Western
Pino Manufacturers association.
HlMiiiliinllJuitlon Aim
"Tho Western I'lno Manufacturers
nmoclntloti hm always boon partlc
ulurly free of any stlgmn of fixing
or malnlalnlnR price or or curtail
I iik production," Allan mild. "Tho
association lias as Its purpose tha
obtaining of Information showing
tha amount of lumber shipped and
price paid In brief, tha data which
make tip any murkot report.'1
"Mr. Cooper has covered tho situa
tion," Taylor sla'.od. "Tho assocla-
t'on activities hsvo nothing to do
with price. Its function U In tho
'v.Uardlzltig of grades mid niton,
nnd In furnishing Its members with
Information on tales after tho sales
have beuu made, not beforo."
IIOMESEEKERS WILL
GET SPECIAL RATE
F. E. Htudebakor, traveling freight
and passongor ARont for tho O.-W,
II. & N., haH rocolved word from
Portland headiiuartors to the effect
thut tho Union Pacific wilt author
ize homoscokoru' rntos from Missouri
river polutH to all points on Us lines
In Idaho, Eastern Oregon, and Hast
en) Washington. A furd plus a nom
Inal nmount, for tho round trip will
bo charged. Tickets may be secured
on the first and third Tuosdays of
each month from March to Novom
iicr, Incluslvo.
PRINEVILLE NAME
OUTGROWN, CLAIM
Prlnovlllo hns outgrown hor name,
according to Ilov. It. M. aallnhor,
Methodist minister In that town. A
title that has any suggestion of the
term "vlllago" Is Inappropriate to a
community of that size, now thnt It
hns a railroad, n county high school
nnd an Irrigation projoct, tho Ited
mond Spokesman quotes him as say
ing. LODGE WOMEN PLAN
ON BASKET SOCIAL
Members of tho Pocahontas lodgo
will entertain nt 0 o'clock Hnturdny
ovonlng ut Bather's hall with if has
kot social and dance, I.ndlos at
tcpdlng aro nakod to bring baskets
filled with lunch. Tho publla Is In
vited. TWO MORE CASES OF
SMALLPOX REPORTED
Mrs. Ernest Daylan nnd daughter
I.ols aro roportod 111 with smallpox
Tho Boylan homo was nlroady under
quarantine, Mr. Iloyjnn., hoylnp.cotf
'trnctod tho dlsenso 'first.. i
. - V
ROADS RELYING
ON BEND MILLS
FOR BUSINESS
LUMBER ACTIVITY IS
IMPORTANT
OFFICIALS ON VISIT
Ihiipto) incut Condition Heller Here
Than Elsewhere In Norlliucnt,
Hays Vlin l'reli!ent uf
H. I', ti H. Ilnllronil.
Itallroads of the northwest are ro
lying on Demi's sawmill activities for
a very Important share of their
freight business at the present time,
was tho statement of W. I), Bklunor,
truffle manager nnd vice president
of the fl, I. A. H. railroad, In an In
terview Friday, lie. with W. r. Tur
ner, prcsldont, A. J. Davidson, gen
eral mnnugor, and 0. E. Votuw, su
perintendent of the H. I. & Jl wero
In Ilond on a trip of Inspection of
tho road and of business conditions.
Sawmills on the coast are active,
but most of their output Is bolng
shipped by boat, Hklnuer explained.
Tho railroads must rely upon tho In
terior, and since Ilond Is tho most
nctlvo manufacturing center of tho
Interior northwest at present, ship
ments from hero aro of great Im
portance to tha roads.
I'litil Condition Hood -Tha
official mado a trip through
thu sawmills In tho morning, and In
terviewed local business men this af
ternoon, accompanied by J. T. Har
dy, traveling freight and passongor
agont, and J. C. Wright, station
neont hero.
Kmployment conditions ara better
hero than thoy. have found them any
wharo olso In the northwest, said
Skinner, although thoy aro Improv
Ing on tho coast and In tho Willam
otto valley. I'artland has tho groat
est unemployment problem because
It Is a point toward which Idle mon
scorn to gravitate.
CoiiMilldnllon Conldereil
Hklnnor stated that nothing actlvo
Is being done toward a consolida
tion of tho two lines running up tho
Deschutes, although It Is bolng con
slderod.
Questioned as to probablo con
structlon from Ilond south to Lnko
vlow, Sklnnor said that only Itobert
E. Slrahorn could give an answer,
but that ho understood that Strahorn
Is having success In furthering his
plans In tho cast.
a. w. Arnoiu nas requested an
nudlonco with officials of tho rail
road, to lay bafore them his plans
for a branch road to La Pino. Skin
ncr expressed doubt as to tho fen a I
blllty of the plan, pointing out that
such a road as Arnold contemplates
would havo fow advantages ovor a
wagon road.
OIL BULLETIN TELLS
OF LOCAL INDUSTRY
Under tho caption, "Utilizing Ore
gon's Junlpor Troos," tho Janunry
Issuo of tho Standard Oil Dullotln
prints nn nrtlclo on tho plant of tho
iianu juniper Products Co., con
structed somo two years ago for tho
manufacture of pencil slats. Tho ar
ticle, with tho four cuts used to
Illustrate It, covers an ontlro pngo
In tho Standard Oil publication.
SCORING AVERAGE
OF BEND BOY HIGH
Arthur Norcott, former Ilond high
school nthleto, has mado an average
of 12 points In each game of bas
ketball playod this year with tho
Mllwaukoo School of Englnoorlng
toam, of wlilch ho Is captain, accord
ing to n clipping from u Mllwaukoo
papor which his mother, Mrs. O. K.
Norcott, has received,
POULTRY FANCIER
PURCHASES RANCH
George P, Downs of Portland, who
has had considerable succoss ns a
rnlspr of purobrod poultry, hns pur
chased thq E, I). Anderson ranch of
Plalnvlow. Tho deal was liandlod
by Churlos Carroll of tho Ilnnhnm
Vails Ileiity Co; T
UUN0, UICHOIIUTKH COUNTY, OHKOOJi, TIH'ltHIM V, FKIIlllVUtY 1(1, 11)22
SEND BIG HAY
COUNTY FARMS
ASSOCIATION'S J'RICE
IS 512
ONLY SURPLUS GOES
I'lenly Left In County I'or Htctck
men Denclmten County Product
Hrlng Highest Prlre In Port
land Market, JtcKrtocI.
Showing tho benefit derived by
Deschutes county farmers from tho
county organization perfected by tho
Oregon Hay Growers association, no
less than 1800 tons of hay havo been
contracted ut a price of $13 on cars,
It was learned last Saturduy from
I), L. Jamison, county agriculturist,
In Hand on his weekly visit
from headquarters at Itedmond. Of
tho total contracted, 000 tons has al
ready been shipped, ho raid.
Of tho !12 prlco, not to exceed
one dollar goes for association
charges. As n matter of fact, accord
Ing to E. E. Duller, of tho Grango
hall district, county organizer, tho
avemgo cost has been between 70
and 80 cants a ton.
Ircliuliii liny 1'iivonxl
A sufficient nmount of hay Is be
Ing retained In tho county to take
caro of tho needs of cattle and shoep
mon who aro having to feed during
tho winter, tho shipments being mado
representing onlyti part of tho coun
ty's surplus. At that, members of
tho association cannot help contrast
ing tha prices they aro now receiving
with tho $6 to $7 a ton which was
tho best many expected early In tho
fall.
Tho association has been placing
I largo orders of Doschutcs county hay
In tho Portland market recently ut
an f. o. b. cars prlco of $12, regard
less of tha fact that Yakima hay with'
a favorable freight differential of $2
por ton Is bolng offored at $8 and
$0 on tho same basis, whilo Hcrmls
ton hay Is going nt $10. 50.
SETTLERS VOTE
NEW DISTRICT
Formation of tho West Sldo Itec
tarnation district In Deschutes, and
Joffcrson counties was voted Satur
day at tho organization election held
ut Lower Drldgo by sottlers within
tho proposod district boundaries
Nlnotcon votes wero cast.
O. E. Stadlg and JFrod Wnltor wero
chosen as dlroctors, whllo It. S.
Townc, J. A. Scott, and I. D. Vedder
tied for tho third placo on tho dl
rcctorato. Which of tho thrco will
servo Is to bo decided later.
FAVORABLE WINTER
FOR SHEEP, STATED
Tho present wlntor promises to bo
ono pt tho best for tho shcop bus!
noss that has ever- been oxperionced
In Control Oregou, nccordlng to Tom
Cronln, slusop raiser who was In from
his ranch on Saturday. Thoro
Is plenty of feed, ho says, and Indi
cations point 'to u hlghor prlco for
wool next spring.
BURNS MEMBER OF
ELKS LODGE DIES
Word of tho death of Harry C.
Smith, for many yonrs n rcsldont of
Uurns, was recolvod this morning by
members of tho Ilond lodge of Elks.
of which Smith' wns a member, Kun
oral sorvtcos will bo hold In Hums
nt 2:30 o'clock Friday afternoon.
CLASS PINS DONNED
BY B. II. S. SENIORS
CIobs pins wero donned Inst wook
by tho seniors of tho Ilond high
school. Thq class has votod not to
adopt tho gray.cupB and gowns which
ha,ve been tho rulo In tho'hlgli school
here, commencement' tlmo.
TONNAGE FROM
REAL PROGRESS
MADE BY BEND,
MILLER NOTES
B. W. L. & P. SHOWING
PLEASES
FUTURE IS UNCERTAIN
Director of llrnil Public Hrrvlre
Company Conrrmeil Over Power
Houm Problem Presented by
Irrigation Development.
Gratification at tho substantial
progress made by Dend, satisfaction
with tho showing mado by his com
pany , through changing war and
post-war conditions, and concern
over what ho looks on as an eventual
complete undermining of tho com
pany's Investment In Dend through
tho various Irrigation development
programs now under consideration,
was expressed Wednesday by Kamp-
stcr U. Miller, director of the Dend
Wntort Light & Power Co. In a
statement mado to Tho Dulletln
shortly beforo leaving Dend after
a wcok's visit In tho city from head
quarters In Chicago, ho expressed a
desire to cooporato In reaching a
fair solution of tho problem.
In his statement, Mr. Miller said:
"I havo spent tho last ten days
looking over tho gonaral conditions
In Ilond and examining tho affairs
of tho Dend Water, Light & Power
company. I think tho peoplo of
Dend havo reason for gratification
at the progress tho city, has mado
during recent years. Whllo thero
has been no great Incrcaso in popu
lation, signs of substantial, improve
ment aro everywhere apparent. Tho
fact that mills and other industries
ara. Tunning full time, and that
thero Is work for all who want it
are Impressive to ono familiar with
business conditions in tho cast.
Rate Ktuyx 1av
"I am satisfied with tho showing
tbo Jlcnd 7Wutor, Light & Power
company has made, considering tho
turmoil and general upsetting of
business conditions during and fol
lowing tho war. When wo under
took tho operation of this property
about ten years ago, Mr. Drown, Mr.
Foley and I sot for oursolvcs as a
standard, tho best posslblo service
at tho lowest posslblo rates. It Is
gratifying to us to realize that we
wero not compelled to ask for an
Incrcaso of rates during or since tbo
war; nlthough prices wont up by
leaps and bounds all over tho United
States. Our rates aro probably as
low as any in tho United States,
with fow It any exceptions. This Is
In part duo to tho fact that wo de
velop our powor in tho city of Dend;
our powor plant Is In the'eenter of
our distribution system.
"I am of course somewhat con
cerned about tho situation rogardlng
our future powor supply. I find
that tho Water board has granted
water permits tor irrigation that
will in effect destroy our power
plant by taking away practically all
Its wator. It Booms to permit tho
taking n'way of our proporty piece
meal, by tho various irrigation In
terests.
Many Projects Btnrtlng;
"The North Canal company Is
about to start Impounding wator at
Crane Prairie; tho Tumalo district
Is planning storago at Crescent lake;
as soon as Its financing arrange
ments aro mado tho North Unit will,
bogln work on tho Donham Falls
reservoir. Euch ono of thoso ac
tivities will take n part of the river
flow necessary to tho operation of
our plant. Whllo wo deslro to co-
opornto In every way posslblo with
tho stato nnd tho trrlgatlonlsts In
tho final utilization of tho waters ot
tho Deschutes for tho groatest pub
lic bonollt, wo cannot ot course sub
mit to any -such undermining ot our
investment. Until tho mattor Is
stralghtonod out by making daflnlto
provision for ropnylng ub for tho
proporty which It Is proposod to
destroy It will bo impossible for us
to secure additional money tor tho
construction ot a new plant.
"Tho destruction ot this powor
plant nnd tho propor provision for
Its roplacomout is a mattor In which
tho citizens of Dend, no loss than
tho powor company, aro vitally con
cerned. Tho location of tho plant
(Continued, on r,oge,8.)
AGRICULTURAL EXPERTS BRING
VITAL MESSAGES IN LECTURES
GIVEN DURING FARMERS' WEEK
BURNS MAY BECOME
. NEW MILLING POINT
Crtilso of (I'oremmrnt Timber Or
dered On Headwaters of HIIvlcs
Itlver, Ilouicn Hopes.
Ilellef that Harney county's timber
harvest Is to start beforo long Is
held In Durna as tho result of the
announcement of Forest Hang
er Itobert Dennett of the Malheur
National forest that he has been In
structed to cruise all the government
timber at the headwaters of Sllvles
river, says tho Harney County News.
The work will be started as soon as
snow conditions permit.
Burns, It Is considered by the
News, Is tho only logical point for
tho manufacture ot this timber.
WOOLGROWERS
WILL BE BUSY
To meet with sheepmen using the
Deschutes, Cascade, Santlam, Ump-
qua, and Fremont forest range, E.
N. Kavanagh of the district office
in Portland, Is in Dend to present to
wool growers a series of questions
ranging from matters of general pol
icy to those connected with Individ
ual applications or grazing permits,
Among questions which sheepmen
are considering at tho meetings be
ginning today aro the eradication
of scabies, affiliation with tbo Ore
gon Wool Growers association, and
extending cf moral assistance in tho
matters of tariff, financing, and
freight rates.-
FATHER AND SON
BANQUET PLANNED
A Father and Son banquet, to be
attended by Doy Scouts and their
fathers. Is planned for March 10
Scoutmaster J. Edgar Purdy, Scout
Commissioner E. L. Payne and S. W,
Moore, secretary of tho Scout coun
cil, arc on a committee with Stanley
Darling and Harold Dorr, member
of tho troop, to arrange tho banquet.
They will meet Saturday evening at
G o'clock at the Deschutes garage,
New patrol leaders for tho Boy
Scout troop were elected at the last
meeting as follows: Troop No. 1,
Itobert Keyes: No. 2, Franklin
Toomey; No. 3, Paul Johnson; No.
4, William James.
FORM COMMITTEE
FOR STATE SHOOT
Organization ot the joint commit
tees ot tho Commercial club and
Trapshootlng club for arranging de
tails and financing ot the state shoot
to bo held here In June was effected
last week. H. E. Allen and It. S. Ham
ilton represented the Commercial
club, and H. N. Buchw'alter, Dr. J. C.
Vandevert, D. H. Pooples and II, D.
Innts wero present ns members of
tho Trapshootlng club committee.
NAMING OF TRUSTEE
ENDS LONG SESSION
Conclusion of the two day credi
tors' meeting in tho bankruptcy case
of the Farm Products Distributing
Co. hold before Referee a. C. Mor
gan, was reached last week
with the election ot Frank M. Davis
ot this city as trustee, and designa
tion ot Qeorgo Jones, Bert Shuey,
and Douglas Johnson as appraisers.
MRS. MANNY HAS
PHOTO OF LINCOLN
An actual photograph ot Abraham
Lincoln Is tho property ot Mrs. Car
rie D. Manny of Hits' city. It Is
small, but a very excellent likeness
ot tho great emancipator, taken dur
ing his prosldoncy. Mrs. Manny re
ceived It from an uncle who was
a soldier in the llnlon 'army,
No. Ql
INTEREST SHOWN IN
PROGRAM
DAIRY CHANCE
SEEN.
ur
Importance of Silo Empluulzctl Iau
Connection With Stock Industry
Cooperation Between City
And Farm Advocated. 1
Experts Jn various branches ot
farm work, coming In tho main from
the Oregon Agricultural college, ara
being heard by interested audiences
In Bend for tho six days covered by
the Formers' Week program. Farra
management, tho Importance of di
versification in Central Oregon, co
operation between farm and city,
stock feeding, range rehabilitation,
boys' and girls' club work, livestock
diseases, and methods of rodent con
trol were among tbo subjects de
veloped during the first thrco days
of the week. Sessions are continu
ing in the circuit court room in tha
court houso building.
Tho romance ot natural things, the
thrilling side ot farm and country
life, and the bright sidq even ot dis
ease and adversity, are to bo sensed
In the address of W. H. Lytle, who
spoke Monday afternoon. Ho did not
follow a set speech, but rather took
up the diseases of stock as they were
brought up by those who bad actual
problems in combating them.
Grub Make Trouble
Catarrh, a common disease of
sheep feeding in corrals during tha
winter. Is known In other loeallUes
as "grub In the head," which Is mora
descriptive; for the dlscaso is a lar
val growth of the sheep botfly, tha
eggs being laid In the summer and
becoming attached to the animal's
nose membrane. They grow large
during the winter, producing the ca
tarrhal Irritation.
Holes bored In logs are filled with
salt for tho sheep, and coal tar Is
spread around the bole so that the
sheep will get it on his nose, said
Lytle In describing the cure. The
tar acts as a nose balm; and is of
fecttv whether tho.trouble Is a true
catarrh or the grub described.
The cure for hoot rot, said LyUe,
Is to turn tho sheep out so that tha
rotted portion of the hoof will wear
off. Then tho diseased animal
should be run through a trough con
taining a' dip compounded ot S per
cent carbolic add, 3 per cont of for
maldehyde and 92 per cent water.
If the animal Is too lame to bo turned
out, a knife may be used in cutting
away the rotten part, beforo tho dip
ping. Goiter Cure Discovered
Goiter, occurring In human beings
as well as among sheep, cattlo and
particularly goata, in higher alti
tudes, Is most frequently caused by
lack ot mineral In tho water and
food. How a euro tor It .was discov
ered is interesting. It was noticed
that deer and othor wild animals
were not afflicted with goiter. Tho
only thing tho wild life bad which
the tame animals did not, was the
use of the salt licks far up In tha
timber.
Investigation of tha salt licks
showed that they containod a,
percentage ot iodine. Iodine was ac
cordingly painted on tho backs of
the animals, and the goiter tendency
disappeared. Iodlno was also found
to bo a euro for the disease In hu
man beings.
Poison Plunts Many
Lytle showed speclmons of wild
onion, lupine, wild parsnip, larkspur
and other poisonous plants occasion
ally found on tho rauges and In the
pastures ot Central Oregon. The
only antldoto for most ot thorn Is
potassium permanganate, tho amount
which a fifty cont piece will hold
bolng mixed In a pint ot wator ;Xor
cattlo, and all that a ten cont "pleco
will hold tor sheep, as a drench.
Tho stiff lamb trouble Is almost
entirely due to these poisons, said
Lytlo. Lupine Is a poison only whon
overripe, which occurs in a wet au
tumn, tho, seed, in the form of, a
beau, being poisonous. Thq wild on
ion, or death camas. which the, .In
dians usod, n committing suicide,
(Contluuod on Page 8.) "