The Bend bulletin. (Bend, Or.) 1903-1931, June 08, 1910, Image 1

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    THE BEND BULLETIN
VOL. VIII
JiltND, ORKGON, WKDNKSDAY, JUNU 8, 1910,
NO. 13
.
WATER GASES
BIRD'S EYE VIEW OF WALKER BASIN IRRIGATION PROJECT, SOUTH OF BEND
COMPMISED
No More Disputes About Squaw
Creek Claims.
APPLICATIONS ARE AAIUNDHD
Company Obliged to Concede- Two-
Third! or the Quantity, l.envlnic
Sufficient Water Only fur
lit Stockholder.
Sibtkhs, Okkoon, June 3 The
37 water contents brought against
svtllers by the Squaw Creek Irriga
tion Co. and the lllnck Unite Laud
& Livestock Co., two Wurzwcilcr
concerns, which were to have been
heard here bcgluuiua: June I, have
ull been dismissed without the tak
(nit of utw testimony. The con
test of Anna K. Dnytou nuiiM
four claimants has been practlcall)
nbandoued. The J. N Qulberg
contest against James I). Palmer re
tnnlns 011 the calendar for hearing
June 13, and Water Superintendent
daxtou stays litre until that date
to take whatever testimony shall
be offered.
1'or several days prior to June 1
there was active preparation for the
hearings. Superintendent V. M.
Saxton of Baker City arrived two
days in advance, with his steno
raphcr, and had the Hardy Allen
hall well sawdusted, seated with
boards and provided with ample
tables. Attorney K. A. Letter of
Portland, representing n dozen ot
the settlers, had been on the
ground nearly a week familiarizing
himself with the situation. Attor
neys Vernon A. 1'orbcs of Mend and
John Gavin of The Dalles, repre
senting other settlers, arrived May
31, Gavin coming with I'erd Mc
Calliitcr, who drove his new Uuick
car from The Dalles. Wells Dell,
representing the Wurzwcilcr inter
ests, was also on band that day, as
well as Wurzwciler himself, the
Slaytons, Joe Howard and others.
Proceedings were informally
opened Wednesday morning early
by a street discussion between I'erd
McCallUter and W. Wurzwciler, in
which the latter became so excited
and boisterous that the neighbor
hood was roused from its slumbers
and had to get up to see about it.
Before the hour for the bearing ar
rived a considerable crowd had as
sembled. A number of ladies were
interested onlookers, among them
being Mrs. David i'ryrcar, Mm.
I'erd McCallUter, Mrs. George Mc
Calliitcr, and Mrs. Marcottc of
Gist.
When Superintendent Saxton
called the docket most of the cases
were passed, for the time being, in
t matlon being given that negotia
tions looking to settlement of the
. T
aBJtHHiSit
ISBBllllllllHBiiKMfeVTSHBSllLllBflP -SllWrA'
MMSgSSIasBMaasflaa
This cut illustrates the segregation aud the reclamation work planned by the Deschutes
Land Co. in the vicinity of La I'ltie, 33 miles south of Bend. The company's Cary Act
segregation embraces 28,000 acres of land situated in what is known aa the Walker Basin and
which will be irrigated with water from Crescent Lake.
Aside from the headworks and storage reservoir at Crescent Lake the system will in
clude 56 miles of main canal nnd 107 miles of laterals. Construction Is In progress on portions
of the work with promise of much being in working order by Autumn. The town of La Pine,
which is surrounded by the Dsschutes irrigated lands, is upon the Hill railroad on the cast
brunch of the Deschutes. The company has offices in Bend and Portland, as well as at La
Pine, l'rcightcr I'. S. If ipc was in Bend this week with a load of machinery for the big exca
va tor lo be ustd on the Deschutes Land Company's work the biggest excavator in the West, to
build which will require 3000
feet of timber. Government
foresters will this week com
plete their appraisement of
the timber on that part of the
canal right-of-way not on the
segregated lands. Then the
work of clearing will be taken
up at once, Manager Morson
says'. A second logging en
gine has been ordered, for
double right of-way crew.
"We have purchased nine
heavy horses and want 10
more," says Manager Morson.
"We advertise for 30 men and
do not get one. We jumped
waees to $1 a dav on the 1st.
None but first class men need apply. Our survey crew Ins already resurvcyed and staked Tp. 33 S,, R. 10 E. and Is working in 34-10."
Mr. Morson has built a neat 5-room cottage at the Hcattic place, eight milea south of Rosland. which he boueht some time aim. T
central for the caual construction and serves as a model ranch for experiment work. T. G. Owen has been cmnloved n- nli-h- .ndnwr rr .,.
excavator, which will operate 33 hours a day two shifts of it hours each.
The road for moving buildings from Rosland to La Pine, a distance of a mile and a half, has just been cleared and the work of actual re
moval is expected to begin the coming week.
R. Fi. GRADING
CLEARED FAST
Work
Progresses RafMly
Vicinity of Bead
PAYMASTERS OFFICE HERE
Four Camps Have Been EsUMtcfced
by Chew & Sitka to Which My
Laborers Are Cetntog
Oeed Health Prevails.
disputes had been broached and it
might be unnecessary to take testi
mony. Shortly after 1 1 o'clock a
recess till 1:30 was taken, and the
parties got busy with attempts to
adjust out of court.
Sisters townsite people had filed
claims for water, each including
water lor domestic purposes as well
as irrigation. This added material
ly to the quantity of water claimed
for each acre, and the total for the
Smith quarter-section, where Sis
titers is located, was tlins greater
than would have been needed
for straight irrigation of the land.
Some modification of the claims ol
the Sisters lot owners was made
and upon the resumption of busi
ness after noon stipulations were
filed dismissing the Squaw Creek
Company's contests against Robert
Smith, Rachel and Prank W. Mc
Gaffery, W. N. Cobb, Jc?s and
William A. Wilt, C. L,. Uentson,
P. B. Davis and II. K. Allen, who
own bisters town property, and
William K. Burkhnrd, Josephine
Stocklcy, Prank Paul. G. W. Mc-
Furlunc, R. J. Griffith, and J. W.
Wilt, who own farm property, all
having reduced their claims to the
neighborhood of one miner's inch
to the acre. Attorney 1'orbcs
orally dismissed the ca.se of Anna
K. Dayton vs. J. W. Wilt.
This relieved the docket mate'
rially and presented the cases be
tween the Squaw Creek Co. and
(Continued 011 pajje 8.)
BEND is growing!
WE are growing!
Are. YOU growing financially?
QET IN LINE! HELP BEND!
HELP YOURSELF
By Starting an Account With Us.
H Deschutes
Banking and Trust Company
Affords Absolute Security
Fire Proof Vault. Modern Safe with Double Time
Lock. Burglar Insurance with a reputable
company. Ofllciuls heavily bonded.
Conservative Banking
for Conservative People.
The Deschutes Banking and Trust Company
h. B. DAIRD, Trei. J. W. MASTHUS, Vice Tret.
M. O. COP, Cashier.
RUNAWAY ACCIDENT SERIOUS.
Hmll lirlcloon, Skull Fractured, Is In
Critical Condition.
I P. M. A report from the
hospital states that there is prac
tically no hope of Emit Krickson' s
recovery. Meningitis has set in.
limit Krickson is in the Bend
hospital In a critical condition, with
a badly fractured skull, as the re
sult of a runaway accident which
occurred last Sunday.
On Sunday afternoon Krickson
and Oliver Johnson were driving
towards town from the Sisemore
place when the neck strap, holding
the neckyoke, broke, letting the
tongue drag on the ground. The
horses took fright and bolted.
"Keep them out of the fence."
cried Krickson. This, says John
son, was the last he heard from
bis companion before the latter
jumped from the rig.
The horses had run but a few
hundred yards when the tongue
stuck in the giouud, stopping the
wagon, from which the horses broke
loose, and throwing Johnson out
Johnson, bruised and cut, called to
Krickson, and 'receiving no reply
went back on the road, where he
found. Krickbon lying on the
ground, his head, which had struck
a rock as he fell, in a pool of blood
Johnson placed the injured man in
the shade and ran to town for help.
au auto was rusued to the scene
of the accident and the sufTerar, his
wounds temporarily dressed, taken
to the hospital.
On the left side of Krlcksou's
crown is a fracture 4 by 2 inches,
besides other serious injuries about
the head.
Krickson is 47 years of age, a
brother of Olc Krickson, and re
cently was employed in building
the foundation of the hospital
building. "
PRODUCTS EXHIBITED HERE.
Many Samples From Powell Dutte
Ranch Show Productiveness
The Home Land Co. has ou ex
hibition in its window some excel
fent samples of grains and fruits
grown this season by Lee Hobbs,
who is farming the Dick Vande
vert ranch at Powell Duttes. The
grain was seeded October 20, 1909,
and the samples were pulled on
June 3. They Include a sheaf of
Scotch Fife wheat nnd one of rye
The wheat stands five feet high and
large, well developed heads are
forming. Mr. Hobbs has 135
acres of this wheat and he snys all
of it is as good as the sample.
The rye stands six feet nine inches.
A twig 4J inches long cut from
one of Mr. Hobbs' apple trees hns
11 small apples ou it, and another
twig, of similar length, contains 14
plums, llranches from gooseberry
uml currant bushes are loaded
heavily with fruit. These crops
are being grown on "dry farnilog"
land, aud are n fair example of the
excellent yield that the Powell
Duties section will harvest this year.
NEW SAWMILL IS fJOINd UP
James 0. Reed Greeting Piatt to Saw
13,000 feet Dally.
James K. Reed is erecting a saw
mill on the Lavcrne Reed claim,
some distance to the eastward of
the Silver Lake road and about two
miles south of Bend. The entire
plant is new and of the stationary
type. The machinery arrived last
week and is now being placed in
positlou. It is expected that the
sawing of lumber will begin in
about two weeks. The capacity of
the mill will be about 15,000 feet
per day. A planer and other ad
juncts will be added later.
Prcd Hunnel and the Reed fam
ily have several tracts of timber
that can be sawed to advantage at
the new mill, and there is much
other good timber available in the
neighborhood.
SMITH MILL TRANSPORTED.
First Load of aistSawmHI Arrives
In Bead.
The first load of machinery from
the Hightoiver-Smith mill at Gist
arrived in Bend today. Engines,
saws and all the machinery from
the dismantled Gist mill will be
freighted over this and next week
and installed nn the location of the
Pilot Butte Development Com
pany's mill, which was destroyed
by fire.
Although considerable delay has
been caused in establishing the
Smith mill here because of the dif
ficulty of securing heavy timbers
necessary for the framework, it is
now stated by 11. J. Ovcrturf, who
has charge of the new mill, that
sawing will be in progress in ten
days. At first the lumber cut will
be that required for the construc
tion of a permanent mill building.
Once this is complete and the en
tire Gist outGt installed lumber for
the market will be manufactured
and quickly cured iu the com
pany's big dry kiln.
LAIDLAW WATER CONTESTS.
Taking; of Testimony WIH Begin There
Next Week.
More than 0 water contest cue ire
to, be heard by Water Superintendent
Saxton at Laldlaw beginning next Wed
nesday, June 15, The Tumalo Irrigation
Co (Wittier) contest Mary J. Mulkey,
J. C. and A. R, George aud the Colum
bia Southern Irrigating Co; C. W. Al
len ha a cc agaiutt the C. S. I. C .
J. N. II. and G. G. Gerklug, Agnes K.
and J. C, George, I), M, Smith and C.
J. Mock; and George W. Winter con
testa the C. S. I. Co. et. al.
The C. S. I. Co. contests the follow
ing: C, W. Alleu, K. II. Bayley, J. W.
Drown, William I). Ilarnes, Cora A.
Drown, It. G. Dowser, William Drowu,
C. P. Decker, J. I.. Crouch, It. S. Cop-
thorn, W. II. Courtney, G. M, and J. R.
Crouch, J. I. Coen, W. I. Downing, V.
It, Dayton, J, N. II., J, O. and Grover G.
Gcrkim:, Angle M. Gibson, J, C, Agnes
M. and W. P. George, W. II. Hale, Al
bert Harper, A. L. Ilarader, A. J. K-er,
P. W. Leverenx. W. W. Long, Praok
Murk, Mary P. Mulkey, Charles J.
Mock, C Nagles, W. W. Orctitt, James
M. Pattoo, A- D. Parks. John P. Park,.
Christian Peterson, A. L. Parker. L. II.
Root. P. R. Relsdorfer, William E. San
del. I'red W. and George L. Simmons,
P. V. Strlther, George W. Snyder, Dan
Smith. Ctmles B. Spaugb, J. O. Thorp,
P. M. Tcwksbury, Tumalo Irrigation Co.,
Charles L., John n., Georjte W., Ira B.
aud Mrs. L. J. Wimer, and Perry A.
Wooley.
These contests pertain to the waters
of Tumalo creek. Many of them are
merely for the purpose of retaining
rights which, in the present situation of
the Columbia Sonthern irrigation enter
prise, might become uncertain if the'
Tumalo adjudication were permitted to
be completed without adequate repre
sentation of alt Interests.
New School House Pbumed.
School District 73, which em
braces the territory surrounding
the Richardson place four miles
east of Bend, is to .have a school
building of its own next term.
The school board for that district,
comprising Messrs. Richardson,
Nelson and Worsstaff, have had
plans and specifications for the
proposed building drawn up by II.
C. Kills, upon which public bids
will be asked for as soon as they
are approved by County Superin
tendent Ford. The new school
house will be 34x24 feet, and, it i
understood, will be built on or near
the Richardson place.
Entertainment Next Wednesday.
The Ladles Aid Society will give
an ice cream social on the J. N.
Hunter lawn next Wednesday
afternoon and evening.
Clearing the Oregon Trunk
ripht-of-way in Bend began last
Thursday and Contractor Olson,
who has the two-mile section ex
tending southward from the north
line of the town, with a force of 10
men has been clearing a length of
400 feet and width of 300 a day
stuce then. The trees are fallen,
brancLes trimmed and burned, BBd
.runks hauled to the edge of the
right-of-way. The trunks will be
used as posts er fired later. The
stumps will be removed when the
traders get at work. The buraiag
of the brush heaps is done at night
and makes an interesting scene.
Last week Paymaster Dewey en
tered upon bis duties here in the
newly-made offices in Lara's Hall,
which now are shared as headquar
ters by Divison Engineer Cryder
man and Malcolm McPhee, repre
senting Contractor Henry. All di
rect payment of labor from Madras
to Klamath Reservation will be
made from this office, by check on
Bend, while time checks will be
issued at secondary offices along
the line, likewise cashable here.
It is understood that uch checks
will be good on date ol taue, with
out the necessity of BMtwrhig.
Chew & Silke, wau have the
construction contrast for i mite
south from Bend, thaw far have
established four camps. One of
these U situated oa the somh side
of the lava field, one on the north,
one at Wetweather Springs, and
one oa the Central Oregoa Canal
tyi miles east of the Rosland road.
Pipe for the pipe line to supply
water to camps, steam shovels and
drills along the grade will be
freighted in from Skaaiko as soon
as possible, while a big steam
shovel will be installed aear Wet
weather Springs in July. To all
camps many laborers are commg
daily, while the Shaaiko road ia
reported literally crowded with
railroad freighters brmgiag in sup
plies aud construction equijHueat.
Nelson Brothers have taken the
grading contract between Trail
Crossing and Redmond. These
are brothers of the Nehwu who
originated the Oregoa Trunk and
died last year.
Dr. U C. Coe of Bead, (a charge
of all the medical work, has eteab
(Continued oh page 8.)
TFe First National Bank
OF BEND, BEND, OREGON
Or. U. O. OOC. Prld.nt E. A. SATHtR. Visa Pr.ilUr.t
O. 8. HUDSON. C-lM.r
OaolUI futlr paid ... tSS.OOO
8tokholdiVIIbtlltr S2B.OOO
Surplu- ..... 92,000
A Bank is Strong
When it has the business, confidence and support of the people.
A Sank, like a man, canpot do business ia community and
not be known by ita conduct. It it ia managed properly, af.
fords the people absolute safety and fair dealing, it -will
receive their builuess and they will continue to patronize it.
Busintxs Stays Only Whir it k Wall
Treated.
Almost everybody In this community does more or less busi
ness with The Pint National Dank of Dend, and we expect,
by fair treatment and progressive methods, to coatiauc to
provide a Dank tlmtTHK PUOPI.B KNOW IS GOOD aud ose
that is a benefit to the entire Dend country.
Our first consideration is SAI'HTV. Note our large cash re
serve, which is always several times the amount required by
the United States Government,
U. C COB
V.
DIRECTORS: ' ,
M. A. SATltr.R C. S. HUDSON
P. SMITH U. C. XM.IS
J