The Bend bulletin. (Bend, Or.) 1903-1931, June 22, 1906, Image 1

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    THE BEND BULLETIN.
X
i i in
VOL. IV
BEND, OREGON, FRIDAY, JUNE 22, 1906.
NO. 14
t
('
V
I
PROFESSIONAL CARD8
C. S. BENSON,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Bend, - Oregon.
W. 1. MYERS
LAND ATTORNEY
Vwttve yraMiprelal ptaillcr Ufcie llir IJ. H.
(.and (imM and Department of the Intnlof.
Alto enteral practice.
Office, LAIW.AW, OKlt.
U. C. COE, M. D.
Ol'l'ICIt OVJIK JIANJC
Physician and Surgeon
Tltl.ltl'IIONlt NO. 21
IIKNI) OKHOON
DR. I. L. SCOFIELD
DENTIST
UIIDMOKI), OKHOON
Will nwUe monthly vlalU
to lloml.
' " J. W. ROMSON
Veterinary Dentistry
Ot'lMCK AT HKNII I.IVKHV TUANSI'HU
CO. STAIII.KM.
IIKNI), .... OKHGON
a
NOTARY l'1'HUC INHURANCH
A. H. GRANT
Att fur
Liverpool, London (t Globe, nml
Lancashire Hire Insurance
Companies.
MINI), - orikion
Crook County Really Co
Real listntc Bouglit and Sold.
Life and Accident
INSURANCE.
orrHTiilwwi.ii'tiKiiiMiiiiKii mkioioi
TRIPLETT BROS.
Barber Shop & Baths
Best of accommodations mul
work promptly done
WAI.I.8T. MINI), OKHOON
JSenb Bulletin
IIOTII "AI'URS
One
Year
TWO DOLLARS
ipovtlnnb
5emiMeeM
Journal
I
60 YEAnC
EXPERIENCE
"Tradc Marks
flraintJA
IAkuninura Aff.
Anron landing aaatrh did duerlpllnn way
" 'llama taatm tCrouah Muim AC McalM
tpittat nollci, without chirm, In th
Scientific flttiericati.
A. handiomelr lllnitraled naatlr. JJraaH etr.
HUNH&Co.30,B'"d"' New York
Wonted.
To contract to deliver 750,000
feet of logs, to commence May 1st.
Hawkins Bkos.,
rrincville.
I5SJH1S
B
ccuso wo arc selling the same and better
quality at a closer margin, is a very good
reason why you will find our store the
best place to buy anything in the line of
Groceries, Drygoods, Furnish
ings, Shoes, Hardware, Sash and
Doors, Paints and Oils
m PINE TREE STORE
II. A. SATIIIIU, PROPRHiTOR
A Complete
DRY
At Mend,
Oregon.
tough, Surfaced
-LUMBERS
AH Widths, Lengths and Thicknesses
INCH COMMON
DIMENSION
SIIIPLAP
RUSTIC
T. & G. FLOORING
Reasonable "HADED CHILING LoHlber
WINDOW JAMBS n,ilPr .
Prices WINDOW CASING D fHf f
fl00j HEAD BLOCKS . ww Wst
U0" O. G. DASHBOARD AwkrC "
(Iradcs STAIR TREADS l f
Dry WATER TABLE D ' & P
3 O. G. BA'ITINS Co., or
Stock MOULDINGS A"5 C S- ' Co.
P. II. D. PATENT ROOKING
FENCE PICKETS
SHINGLES
ETC., ETC.
CUSTOM PEED MILL IN CONNECTION.
The
Pilot Butte Development
Company
BEND,
Tlinlwr Mint, Act June J, I&T.
NOTICE FOR PUELICATION.
U. H. Laud Oltlce. I.aVcvlcw, Oregon,
June . ly.
Notice U htrcliy siren that In compliance with
Iheproil.lonaoflhe Actuf Consrcja of Junes.
i7. entitled, "An net for in.- aileofllmlier land;
In the alatra of California, ore-sou. Nevada, mid
WaihliiKtnu Territory." aa cafended to all the
public Unit atalcaliy Act of Auiutt 4. !).
1 tarry I.. r.ltl,
of Portland, county of Multnomah, talc of
Oregon, haa Med In thla office hli
woni Malruicut No. j-mo, for the nrclicort he
Mid will ntfer proof tu (how that the land
mg!il la mote finable for Hi. tlmlicr or atone
than lor agricultural piittioiiea, ami to e.tab
lull liU claim lo wild lami Ufuie Hie KciUter
and Urcelvcrat likeilew, Oresou, on 1'fldny,
Hie JUI day of Aiigint, l6. ...
He liniur. aa vrllurtwa Orn foludexter, or
ITIurvttle. orruoii, aud Jainca 1). Ilonryman, of
Hcnd.OtcKOii. . . ,
Any and all pcraoua clalmliiK adversely any of
llic almvc iletcrllwd lmlare roiueatnl to file
tliclrclauna In lliU olflcconur befote the Mild
lint dny of Auuuil, 1906.
fljaM IN WATBON. KegUUr.
CONTKST NOTICE.
IIIU'AKTMHNT OV TIIH INTKKIOK.
I'. S. I.aml Ofllce, The IMlleii, Oickoii,
June 7, 1 90S.
A mindful content nlTui!lt liavlUKliecit filed
In thla ollk-o by Mclltaa C Cooin, conteataul,
onaliut hoincatend entry No. usfio, made October
7, wi. rprilicHjiiiiU.iuwi ec M. tp iu ,
r II V, W 111, by Kunciie 1. Aahlinc
coutenlcc. In which It U alleged that
Mid lttiBcuc I. Aahliiie.lmachnuKtllilamldcnce
theicfroui for more than alx nioutlia lt .l
that mid trad U not aetllcil uwiu and cultlvutcd
by auld patty rnpilred by law aud that
aniu mtiurea aim cxitis inai aam ai
leged alMcucc wan not due to lila empWmeut
In the army, navy or marine corpa of the 'illicit
notified to appear, reioud and offer evidence
loiichiiiKaild allegation at lo o'clock n. m. on
July 11, 191, before II. C. KllU.al' H. CoiiimU
iloiicml hUodice In llcnd, Oiegun.aud that final
hearing will lie held at 10 o'clock a. in. on July
H, loui before the KruUlcr aud Krcelicr at
the V. H. I.aud Ofilce, The Dallra. Oregon.
The old coutcataut having, In a proper affida
vit, filed June 4. guo,.ct forth facta which
how after due diligence peraoual aervlre bf thla
notice can not be made, It la hereby ordered aud
directed that auch notice be given by due aud
proper pubtlcuttou.
Jljjulio MICHAKI.T. NOI.AN, KegUUr.
Hlutcalti time otwiir, aald pnillca are lit,-euy
Stock of
and Moulded
At Bend,
Oregon.
OREGON
A
NOTICE OF SALE OF UNPATEN
TED SWAMP LANDS.
Notice is hereby given that the
State Lntitl Board will receive scaled
bids until two o'clock i. m. July
2.), 1906, for auy interest the state
may have iu the following described
unpatented Swamp Lauds, to-wit:
The NEK. N14 of SEtf, SWtf
of SE and SEtf of SWJf of
Section 24 and W of Section 25,
Tp. 25 S., R. 6 5-:., the lands in
Section 25 being uusurveyed.
All bids must be accompanied by
an application aud affidavit to pur
chase iu accordance with Section
3302 of Bellinger aud Cotton's Code
ami declaration as provided by Sec
tion 3303 aud by cash or check for
full amount offered.
No bid for less than $1.00 per
acre will be considered.
The right to reject any aud .all
bids is reserved.
Applicatiousymd bids should be
addressed to G G. Brown, clerk
State Land Board, Salem, Oregon,
aud marked, "Application aud bid
to purchase Unpatented Swamp
Lands." G. G. Bkown,
Clerk State Laud Board.
DAted this 26th day of April, 1906
R. D. WICKHAiYl
Attorney - at - Law
OFl'ICIt OVKK UANK
UKNI),
ORUGON
GALA DAY AT BEND
State Land Board Present
at Farmers' Institute.
INSPECTS IRRIQION WORKS
Governor Chamberlain Speaks to Set
tiers and l'ralf?cs tue Country lor
Its Rapid 0ec1kpment.
That the Deschutes valley con
tains the latent possibilities of a
great development mid that remark
able strides have becu made iu the
past two years in the transforma
tion of a barren desert waste into
a new and prosperous common
wealth was the united opinion of
Governor Chamberlain, and the
other state officials who were the
guests oi the Deschutes' Settlers
Association at their institute held
in Bend Tuesday, June q, A devel
opment, in magnitude and thor
oughness so great that it was diffi
cult to fully realize its importance,
was the verdict of these state offi
cials. The institute Tuesday was the
third of a scries being held by the
irrigation associations of Laidlaw,
Redmond and Bend. Recently it
was learned that the governor and
other state officials would soon
make a visit to the segregations of
the Columbia Southern Irrigation
Company und the Deschutes Irri
gation & Power Company, and
plans were made to hold an institute
at Bend at the time of their visit
here. The appointed day dawned
bright and clear with a cool breeze
fanuing the air, the committees
were early at work performing the
last necessary duties for the day's
program, and the visiting crowds
soon began to appear, with them
the governor's party consisting of
Governor Chamberlain, State
Treasurer Charles A. Moore, Attorney-General
A. N. Crawford, State
Engineer John H. Lewis, and State
Land Agent Oswold West. These
were accompanied by F. S. Stanley,
general manager of the Deschutes
Irrigation & Power Company, and
Jesse Stearns, a prominent stock
holder in the company.
The Trout Barbecue.
The day's exercises opened with
a grand trout barbecue and basket
dinner on the batiks of the Des
chutes. Tables had been built in a
suitable place, at which from 500
to 600 people were served. It had
been advertised as a trout barbecue
aud about 1500 of these toothsome
fish were served to the hungry peo
ple, besides many other very edible
foods furnished by the ladies of
Bend, Laidlaw, Redmond, Rosland,
Sisters and the surrounding country
iu general. To some this large
number of trout served at one occa
sion might seem like an un
warranted inroad on the game sup
ply of the Deschutes, but when it is
considered that this number is only
about an average week's catch in
this vicinity during the fishing sea
sen, it is readily fccu with what an
abundance bf trout this stream is
stocked. Besides trout and other
delicacies, bear steak was served to
those who wished it.
Mayor.Goodwillie welcomed the
visitors in a few words. Mr. Stearns
replied in a very happy and witty
speech and then everybody partook
of the good things before them.
A bevy of Bend's young girls,
decked in dainty white caps and
pretty aprons, assisted in the serv
ing of the dinner,
One featiire of the barbecue that
deserves special mention was the
manner in which visiting ladies as
sisted iu the work of serving aud in
the abundance of good things which
they brought iu their baskets. Bend
ladies have expressed themselves
as being very grateful and much
pleased with .the evident desire of
their lady guests to do all they
could, to make the day a great
success.
am
' Trie Institute Program. .
Iu the absence of the president of
the Bend association, A. M. Drake
called the audience, which had
gathered in the church, to order
and presided. The first speaker was
II. V. Jones, president of the D. I.
& P. Settlers' Association at Red
mond. Mr. Jones spoke briefly of
the harm that can be done to a new
country by false rcporjg regarding
the presence of friction between
the settlers aud the irrigation com
panies He vigorously denounced
such rumors as false as far as the
settlers of his association, were con
cerned, and said that' everything
was perfectly satisfactory.
Governor Chamberlain followed
with a few very pleasing and sen
sible remarks. He first pleaded
for harmony of action between the
settlers and the developing com
panies; pointed out how paralyzing
to a proper development of a country
any iuharmony would be; he urged
that all should strive together id
the development of this magnificent
new country. In the governor's
.opinion one requirement was the
.necessity for the new settler to
.'study the new conditions. A differ
ent soil to work with, a different
climate, and an artificial method of
supplying motsyiic to the growing
crops required study by the new
comer to reap the best results.
Governor Chamberlain expressed
himself as well pleased with the
work of the D. I. & P. Co. He
said its ditches and entire reclama
tion works showed the marks of
permanency. "
The one thing hat impressed the
governor to the greatest degree
was the remarkable development of
this regiou during the past two
years. At that time he had made a
visit here. Then he found a few
scattering cottages along the river
and two or three buildings on the
townsite. Now he was entertained
in a prosperous little city with well
laid streets, beautiful lawns, a fine
g-avity pressure water syscm and
new public school building suit
able to cities many times the size
and age of Bend. Where before he
found barren desert wastes now he
could count prosperous ranches by
the score.
Regarding the part the state
land board would take in contro
versies between settlers and irriga
ting companies, the governor said
that the board was determined that
the rights of the settlers should be
protected at all times as well as the
interests of the companies.
State Treasurer Moore then
spoke briefly. Mr. Moore is a
practical irrigationist with a ranch
in the Klamath country. He
urged united cfor flu, the part of
the settlers.
John II. Lewfc, state engineer,
told of plaus to. secure proper laws
in Oregon covering irrigation
questions and water rights.
E. l. James of Laidlaw told how
important it was that the new
comer ghauld not allow himself to
become discouraged aud said that
the man who stayed and labored
the "sticker' not the "quitter"
was the Que to reap the profits in
after years.
Dr. U. 0. Coe spoke ou the sub
ject of a pure water supply. He
explained why barrels, ouc-tets ana
other utensils used to hold water
for drinking a.n,d qther purposes
should be frequently cleaned, and
showed how disease germs were
prevalent in the sediment that ac
cumulated ou the sides and bottom
of such receptacles. He urgently
recommended that all water be
boiled during the hot seasou, es
pecially ditch water. Dr. Coe also
urged tome actiqn by the settlers
that would keep the river free from
contamination from carcasses and
other sources.
Rev. J. C. George of Laidlaw
was the last speaker. He told of
his unbounded faith in the country
and prophesied great development
for the future,
Tito Reception.
The local association had re
quested the use of the A, M. Drake
lawn on which to tender a recep
tion to the governor aud his party.
A large number of Japanese
lauterns were suspended among the
tress and the illumination therefrom
gave a very pretty effect. Two
(Continued oil page 5, column 4.)
CONTRACTS ARE LET
Work on Oregon Trunk
Line Will Soon Begin.
SO SAYS A LEADING OFFICIAL
Money to Finance the Undertaking Is
Provided What the Surveyors
Are Dolnz South of Bend.
The prostXCt for the hetMnnfntr
of railroad construction nn n,r rw.
chutes river grows brighter day
oy aay. a prominent Oregon
Trunk Line official, writing to a
party at Madras last week, said:
"Contracts are let and work has,
commenced. There '(3 no "longer,
any question as to the intention
or financial ability of the Oregon
Trunk Line Co. The road is to be
built now."
This means that within a few
months Madras will enj'oy railroad,
communication with the outside
world. And when Madras gets a
road, it is only a question of a few
months longer until the road
reaches Bend. That is the sub
stance of railroad news regarding
the Oregon Trunk Line. Its
officials some time ago announced
their purpose to build from the
mouth of the Deschutes river to
Bend.
On the Natron-Ontario Survey.
The railroad surveyors aud
engineers who have been working
inthe vicinity of Wagontire moun
tain stopped over Sunday in town
on their way to the sum
mit of the Cascade mountains
near Crescent lake, says the Burns
Times-Herald, where they will
again work west until they meet
the other crew coming eastward.
There are three crews working on
the line at present, the pay roll
aggregating $6,000 per month and
work is pushed rapidly. The levef
country between Crescent lake and
Wagontire will be run through this
winter. Mr. Buck, the foreman of
this outfit, informed us that he was
on a branch line to Lakeview and
had progressed 64 miles in that
directiou when ordered tft the
mountains to work on the main
line and get it through before snow
would block their progress. He
says all railroad talk heretofore has
been by promoters but now with
real Harriman interests at stake
the thing would be on the move
until all construction work is com
pleted. Surveys are practically fiuished
to the Narrows where work has
been going on from the Ontario end
since last October. The main line
will be somewhere between Ft.
Rock and the knolls about 20 miles
north of this place, with feeders
both north and south, so when this
road is completed Eastern Oregou
will be amply supplied with rail
roads. Coming From California,
One road that is actually doing;
construction work but which doesu't
attract the usual atteution in these
parts, is the Gould line building
from Madeline to Alturas. This
road will eventually be extended to
Lakeview and there are those who
think Gould has his eye on Port
laud aud will ere long push his
road northward from Lakeview
through the Bend country to that
port.
A correspondence of the Sacra
mento Bee from Reno uuder date of
May 30 says: All doubt about the
extension of the Nevada, California
and Oregou railway, (the Gould
hue; trom Madeline to Alturas,
Modoc county, Calif., was removed
last evening when Superintendent
Duuaway said to a Bee represent
atives "On the inoruiiiK of Tune
1st a large party of workmen will
begin the construction of the road
to Alturas. The new line will be
40 miles long, aud will open up one.
of the richest agricultural aud
timber countries in the Sierras.
Materials are on hand for the ex-,
tension, and trains will soon run
into Alturas "