Grants Pass daily courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 1919-1931, October 11, 1919, Image 1

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WE'RE TELLING THE WORLD :: CON" Uy:OY IT"
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VOU X., No. 21.
GBACTfl PASS, JOSETHnni OOCKTT, OREGON, HATUtDAY, OCTOBER II, 1019.
WHOLE MMBER 9799.
M)
liftt
REDCROSS HAS
MADE PAYMENT
WITHOUT DIE
TVUNH I.V liH4 AH ITH I'llO RATA
CW UllKAT I5,0H),MM WAH
KVXU
IN
XutlkiitK Hut Dollar NutMtrrliUon to
Il Accpfcdj Half of Morwjr to
lUmwin With Loral ltuter .
A meeting of ths dlre tor of the
.Rod CroM was held yesterday noon,
and reports were made by the presi
dent, secretary and treasurer and
Mr. Mom, secretary of the home ser
lc com in It tea.
The local chapter lial the option
of conducting a campaign (or Ita
pro rata or the $ K.. 000, 000 war fund
drive or remitting out or Its treasury
the amount slloted to It. Inasmuch
as the treasury showed a' balance or
bout $1700, sufficient for the esti
mated need of the year, the amount
of I'JM was ordered forwarded to
the northwestern division office, and
as a consequence Inure will he no
campaign (or war funda In Novem
ber. However, $x7.M have been
loaned since January 1, on local
asca.
It was. disclosed, . however, that
there will ho a drive for mcmber
ahlps In the Hod Cross, commencing
November 2nd and endlnK Novem
ber 11. This la a national drive and
It la exported Ihnt every one will re
new hla tnombenihlp In the Uil
Crim rir the coming year. Nothing
but dollar subscriptions will -ho tak
n and hair or the money will re
nin In in the local treasury. A. K.
Onss ban heen appointed chairman
t the membership 'drive and an ur
gent request la made that nit prr
aona give ot their time aa liberally
a they have In the past to make thin
4rlv6 successful.
It was also shown by the reports
made that 410 cases, alnre .Innunry
1, 1919, have been handled by the
dome sep-lce committee, Involving
mil phase or soldier's affairs. The
recent visit of a niirao who saw ser
vlro In France, brought the report
that Josephine crtuqty chapter wbb
wplcndldly orKnnlr.ed to take rare of
the probloma of fta aoldlora and their
families or dependent.
A commit teewns apttlntnd, with
C. I, Thompson aa Its chnlrmun, to
nominate director (or the coming
.your and to hold un election over
the. county, ,
lteport waa made that advices had
been received from the division of
fice that It would not be nocessary to
keep forfnture use the rooms occu
pied In the courthouse aa sowing
room.
One of the questions Involved In
ho penco-tlme program of tile Tied
Cross, la the questlontas lo whether
the Red Cross should take over the
handling or civilian cases not con
nected in any manner with those
men engaged In the recent conflict,
and Alias ,Tane Allen, of the site
bureau or health, was called upon
to make a statement concerning her
mission to this country at this time.
v Miss Allen stated that money re
'veivufl rrom the sale or Rod Cross
At iimps at Christmas time for the
care of tubercular patients, had been
allotted to Josephine 'county, and If
r few people would express their
desire to have visiting nurse come
to this county for a period of three
monthsA without expense, the state
board of health would be glad to
eond one ns soon as they could find
a person competent and qualified to
accept such a position, ,
The luncheon was served by Mrs
Alice Malloryv who has served all of
the Tied Cross luncheons since the
organization of the local chapter in
April,. 1917.
IEIIT
mi it in
Mold I . Wnur nikI Rob lUrh I'mm
sciigrn. of IWI.OOO.OOO Ruble;
tlio Poor Am Hpared
llivtoum, Cancssla, Oct. 11. Six
robbers, travelling 'aa passengers
commandeered the Russian steamer
Constantino on a recent trip between
this port and Constantinople and
robbed a selected .list of wealthy pas
sengers of 30,000,000 rubles. The
robbery was conducted with the dar
ing and finish of an American train
hold-up.
The Conatantlne carried merchants
from Tlflls, Baku, Bagdad and Evl
van, proceeding to f onetantlnople to
purchase goods, with cash In gold
and Romanoff rubles for the purpose.'
There was nothing to Indicate the
character of the robbers until the
shlpiwaa within 12 hours or the Bos
puorua, whuu Uiu captain and crew
at th point or pistols, were ordered
forward and the engines stopped.
The leading merchants were lined
Up, as their names were read from
a list, 'and their persons and bag
gage searched. It was a rase or all
firearms on the deck and arms aloft.
The rrew and the humbler passen
gers were not tnolested.
The captain was ordered to navi
gate his Hhl( close to shore, the pile
of flrearnit was tossed Into a life
boat, and the rohlM-rs moved to land.
They Immediately disappeared In the
hills of Anatolia. The members of
tKo crew who rowed them ashore re
ceived a handsome tip.
tGGS $1.35 DOZEN
LI
Ixtndon, Oct. 1 1. .I'roflleerlng in
3Ks Is attracting the attention of
tho food ministry because or com
plaints which are reaching It from
all iwrts of the country, in some
London districts the retail price Is
ll.STi a dozen, and the cheapest Is
II. If this condition continues. It
Is 'announced, the ministry will step
In to protect the consumer.
mU AXI QfKFA
VISITIXU HOOVKIt
Santa Hnrhani. Cat.. Oct. 11.
King Albert and Quoun Ell-
nboth and. the Crown Prince o(
Itelglum arrived here today for
a three-day stay at the home o(
Herbert Hoover.
IN MAHONING VALLEY
Youngstown,' Ohio, Oct. 11. The
lirst' Iron mnnivfuclured In the Ma
honing Valley eince the stoel strike
began, was poured rrom the blast
furnace here early' today. Activity
at other plants Indicates that they
will attempt to manufacture Iron
soon.
ROBBERS USE PEPPER
INSTEAD Of PISTOLS
Cleveland Ohio. Oct. 11 Sly rnh.
bers'thlB morning held up the pay
master ot the Samuel Emerson com
lnny, In the lobby of the building,
and after throwing pepper In his
tnce escaped In -an automobile with
$11,000. .
MKKIMjKHS fig
Pomona, Cal., Oct. 11. A seed-lc.-s
Tig has foeen developed here by
W. 'P. Bollnger, after several years
'r'jor. iHortlculturallsts are iild to
regard It as a distinct addition to
fig culture.
BANDITS Itl DK
OUTDO WILD WEST
GERMAN GUNS
BATTER RIGA '
FOR ATTACK
HMM'K MCTTIHH Tlt(Kl'H TO
KVAt H'ATK CITV; KKHITINO
CXJXTIXriM SKK MITAl'
Captain of Htiutir Koroetl by Mu
tiny to Imnd at Heme While Tak
Ing 1iuiM4oiib to Antl-ltolHlutvllts
london, Oct. 11. 'It was stated In
autnorltlve quarters this afternoon
that the German-Russian attack on
Riga was carried out Friday underkhe
cover of a hMvy bombardment by
German guns, forcing the 4etts to
evacuate the city.
Copenhagen, Oct. 11. A German
telegram from Mltau says the right
ing between the German and Lettish
troops continues between Mltau and
Riga. None of the troops subser
vient to the German government par
ticipated. lndon, Oct. 1 1.- "tiormany's
new war" Is featured In this morn
ing's papers In connection with the
'fighting at 'Riga. The whereabouts
ot General von-Der Colts continues
to be a subject or contrary rumors.
Klume,. Oct. 1 1. -The jitoamer
Persia, hound from Genoa to the
Orient with 'munitions for the anti
holshevlst forces, has arrived here.
The crew mutinied and the captain
was for ed to land at Klume.
M.wa.iNK PICI.Vri.Ml SHOPS
AUK nXKKI) BY STItlKKH
New York, Oct. 11. Every maga
sine printing establishment In this
city has been closed as a result of
the "quarrel between certain local
unions and their International un
ions" according to announcement by
the Periodical (Publishers' Associa
tion or America.
The publishers also announced
that "three very larg publications
have already completed plans ror
peramnent removal a'nd their print
ing machinery and paptr supply Is
now being shipped to Chicago."
SALE ARMY SUPPLIES
S
With the American Forres In Ger
many, Oct. 11. Twelve hundred mo
tor trucks abandoned by the German
army In the area taken over by the
Americans as port or the armistice
material were sold recently to a
syndicate ot German automobile
dealers. This deal virtually conu
plotes the work ', of the Coblenz
branch of the Cijlted States liquida
tion commission.
The sale of surplus property of
the American aTmy at the Antwerp
base which also hns been completed
brought to the government $ 1 4,000,
000, most'' f the goods disposed or
to the Relglan government, bringing
a better price than could have been
obtained In the United States.
By the sale or a part or surplus
stocks of the American forces In
Germany, much of which was sold to
German civilians, the sum 'or $11,
000,000 'was realized. Among the
material sold recently to German
dealers was 2,000,000 pounds or
candy or a kind not particularly In
demand among the American sol
diers.
Oakland. Cal., Oct. 11. Street car
operatives on strike here voted today
to return to work at noon, union
official!) announced, under the terms
of settlement arranged by the state
railroad commission.
FLY NG A N
WINNER IN THE
E
LKW MIXMLA 9:24 . m., OCT.
H, AKJUVKU AT KKIfMX TO
BAY AT 1:12 p. m.
RETURN TRIP STARTS OCT, 20
Sergeant HcKee and Iieut. Kiel, of
Oregon, Are Among the leaders
in EaMbound Flight
8a n Francisco, Oct 1U- Lieuten
ant Maynard, the "Flying Parson,"
leader of the westbound aviators in
trans-continental airplane derby.
reached' San Francisco today at 1:11
from Mlneola, X. Y... from whence
he left at 9; 24 a. m. on October. 8.
Blnghampton, Oct. 8. Major
SpaU, eaatbound, arrived here at
2:51, Lieut. Kiel arriving at 3:50.
San Francisco, Oct. 11. Interest
In the trans-continental airplane
derby today centered In the semi
final dash to the. Pacific of Lieuten
ant B. W. Maynard, the "Flying Par
son," who arrived at Mather Field,
Sacramento, at 11:50, only 75 miles
from his destination, and that of
Lieutenant C. Kltfl ot Oregon, and
Major Earl Spatze, who arrived at
Buffalo en route to Mlneola shortly
lefore noon.
4toth the eastbonnd and westbound
aviators expected to completed the
first hair or their trips today, with
time to spare.
Captain U H. Smith, who led the
eastbonnd filers up until today, lost
his way in a heavy rain near Cleve
land today, and made a' forced land
ing and broke' a propellor. He ex
pects to continue hla flight later to
day.
Sergeant McKee, mechiniclan for
Lieut. Kiel, Is rrom Medford ud is
known in Southern Oregon. Lieut.
Kiel has also made several nights In
this state.
Washington, Oct. 11. The return
trip or the army airplanes In the
trans-continental race will start on
October 20, the army air service
announced today. The planes will
be held at the coast stations ror re
pairs, S. S. SCHELL
FINE PIECE
"A regular boulevard the finest
that I have seen In the state south
of Portland," was the statement
made the other day by one ot the
paving Inspectors, In speaking of
the six and a half miles or new pav
ing from Crania Pass south to the
Jackson county line.
A fine compliment to S. S. Schell,
who Is now putting the- finishing
touches to the job.' It is all com
pleted" with the exception of spread
ing the asphalt on a short stretch
near the Sixth street bridge, but
this has been held up for the reason
that a car ot asphalt ordered from
son r ranctsco several weeks ago,
has been lost through re-routing,
due to the cave-In at a tunnel near
Kennot, Cal., recently.
Mr. Schell, In the meantime, -is
making good headway In repairing
Sixth street In Grants Pass, from I.
street to the bridge, and the work
of scarifying is about finished. He
will soon begin sctve operations on
his Becond contract, trom the Jack
son county line to -Gold Hill, in
which undertaking J. L Calvert of
this city Is also interested.
Good progress is reported being
made on the new 'bridge across the
Rogue at Rock Point.
PLAN
DERBY
TZ
Admiralty and IJyd aX london Ms
credit Rumor, an, They Have Re
ceived No Notice
Archangel, Oct. 11. Two thou
sand lives have been lost In a wreck
of an unnamed British snip on the
Norwegian coast, according to a
wireless "dispatch from Helslngfors.
London, Oct. 11. Neither the ad
miralty nor Iloyds hare received In
formation relative to the wreck of a
British ship on the Norwegian coast.
These soirees discredit the report.
If the loss of life In the wreck re
ported Is as large as indicated, the
disaster will mark a new record in
the annals of the sea. It would seem
probable that the ressel lost was a
British transport bringing British
soldiers from Archangel, from
Whence Great Britain has ben em
barking large numbers of men, but
It Is not known that troops ships
have sailed recently from Archangel.
PROHIBITUM BLLTj SO
. VV TO THE PRK8IBEXT
Washington, Oct. 11. Following
the refusal or union' longshoremen!
New York today to unload rive ves
sels en route from Europe, Secretary
Baker announced that soldiers will
do the work.
L
1N DISTRICTS 7, 8. 9
Petitions have been presented to
the county court requesting the court
to call special meetings in road dis
tricts 7, 8 and 9 for the purpose'of
levying a special road tax oot ex
ceeding ten mills (or the graveling of
the main thoroughfares in said dis
tricts. . JDistrict No. 7 is the Fruit
dale and .Murphy sections; Xo. 8 'is
the iProvolt-Wllliams section, and
Xo. 9 is the section in the vicinity
of the River Banks 'Farms.
Acting upon the eaid petitions the
county court has called a special
election to be held in the various
districts on the 3rd day of Xovem
ber, 1919, at 10 o'clock a. m. (or
that purpose.
i.naer tne taw tne districts can
levy up to 10 .mills on .the dollar,
and upon doing so cooperation can
then be had with the county court,
state highway commission and the
federal government. This will be
the means of several thousand dol
lars 'being spent on the roads of the
above dbOslcts during the next years
and ceiirflnly shows the progressive
spirit of those 'living in the various
districts.
Seattle, Wash., Oct. 11. Unless
something unexpected happens.
trains will be running over the gov
ernment railway In Alaska by 1922
or 1923, John W. Hallowell, assist
ant secretary ot the Interior, predict
ed, bere recently upon his return
trom an Inspection tour over the
road. The railroad is being built
trom Seward, on the ocean, to Fair
banks, on the interior river system
Within a Kew weeks the United
States senate will take up a bill ap
propriating $17,000,000 ror the com
pletion or the railway.
PKKSIhKXT ltKTTKU; i 4
MVST RpiAIVyRKJ
. -
Washington, Oct. 11. Pres
oeni, wiison naa another goo
night's rest and hlsi conditio:
shows improvemenjjtias-salil
at the White House today, but
he
for
lng
standing his continued Ira.
' provement.
REPOR
DOWN 0!
I STEAFsiER
will be rorced-to st ar.In- fced
an extended Sxjriodj acctfrd-
to Dr. Grayson, tiotwith-
T
T
ATTKIBl'TKB THEIR FIGHTING.
QUALITIES TO OUR FIXE ED
' fCATIONAL SYSTEM
DENIES HE WAS A REPORTER
"Our People Are Thrifty and Wtfl
Pay," Says King, Rot Most Re- -
cefve Help Temporarily
On Board King Albert's Special
Train, Oct. 11. King Albert gave
yesterday in the first interview which
ha baa granted in the United States,
some of the Impressions be tiat ab
sorbed since be came here. He said
the day he landed that one of the .
purposes of hla coming here was to
obtain ideas and lessons applicable
to 'Belgium. Something was said of
American troops and his majesty,
himself a soldier of brilliant attain
ments. Immediately became enthu
siastic.
Your armies were wonderful," he
said. "Even your own 'people did .
not think, dfd they, that yon could
send over two million men in a year?
And such fine soldiers -they were.
They seemed to be born fighting
men. I do not know bow to say it
in English, but there seems to be
something in yonr soil which grows
such men. They went 3,000 miles
to fight for an Ideal and wherever
I saw one of them he knew what he
was fighting for.
It was a tribute to your educa
tional system that they were all so
intelligent and that they could be
trained In so short a' time."
Pointing to a school house in a vil
lage his train was passing, be said:
See, the schools are the largest
buildings, and It is so all over your
country. Everyone here is educat
ed. Not only have you lower schools
and high schools and colleges but
Institutions of research, where the
young men inay get such splendid
training. They are the peak, the.
summit."
Pointing to the broad fields past
which the train was speeding bis
majesty went on:
Here there are large farmers and
small farmers. It Is well that it is
so, for the ownership of land makes
for Increased production. The Unit
ed States is fortunate. It has more
than it needs of everything and out
or its abundance it can supply sus
tenance for Europe. Tlfls year and
the next will be the tworst. After1
that we should be able to sivpply ou
selves' with food. It is well you 'use '"'
machinery to harvest your crops?-" rn '
Belgium It Is not so. Before the war
all the work In our fields 'was 'done'
by hand." ' ; u-T u
There was a wlstrul ?abttf- In Mflsf -
voice aa though he were thinking 'of
the men who would go to the harvest "
no more. $ irT .-..td-.v-r
All your peopleare-prosperous,''' T
he continued. They? have-' money;
When I was in Nesw York' 1' was- In
the stock exchange,' that fs the tern-
YANK
1
HAS
1
ALBER
ter ot the world's finances.''!':-!"
Turning brfeflyta lAWrlcarf in- 'r
vestments In Belgium,- Albert said
proudly: .-i.t rO, -uN, I
"Our people are thrifty , and: they
will, pay their debts.'' ,i: ,- v r ,.6
Keenty interested Mn financed he
nodded . approval . at the st ggdstton'
that .the purchase of l,Iberty! bonds' ''
had ; itanght loseons of "thrirt" and'
commented on the f aot that what he
called "state bonds'," were not widely
held -until patriotism opened an un- ?
explored field, f ---. " ..:
"But everyone had money, to buy
tnem.iwith,'t. he added with a smile. '
The king's face grew grave when' '
labor -unrest -throughout the world "
was mentioned and he spoke Inter-.-'
estedly- of the conference of capita!
and-lffbdfrat Washington designed to'
find a solution, .r.-'nio a-'.i-s-t '
"It is well," he added, "that there'
can be a conference. There can be
(Continued oc page I.)