Grants Pass daily courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 1919-1931, October 02, 1919, Image 1

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    . w IT'S THE CLIMATE : : WE'RE TELLING THE WORLD
: : COME AND ENJOY IT "
JJMjj University of OreJLttran' M-
M lit l till
VU- X., No, lil.
OF
E
INVKhTIUATING UK.VDH . 11M
HAITIXKHH AND PHOHPKUITY
IN MIMMIHKIITI
'OHE MULE FABMS" PAY WELL
Manx Former Iturk-rikinnwl Tenant
Now Worth Thousand and Sport
Good Automobile
Chicago, Oct. 2. Exceptional bap
pliiww, contentment mid prosperity
among-too negroe of 'Mississippi 1
reported by a committee of Chicago
white mid negro inun after nn Inves
tigation of condition (n Uiat Halo.
The committee won tloloBHtoJ to visit
Mississippi by the Chicago iAorla
tton of Common-, the federal bureau
of labor and by 'organized labor to
which had been referred a question
of aiding the return of Southern
born negroes to the South.
A written statement prepared by
tho com mil toe said: '
"The happiness, contentment and
prosperity among the "colored race
In Mississippi In much greater than
the committee expected to find. We
know no place where greater happi
ness and prosperity prevail among
thorn."
School faVilliles were found tn be
NEGROES
OUT
H BECOM
LAND
1
Kood. rhurehes adequate. housing
condition being Improved rapidly
and race relation good, according to
. tho report, while the Industrious ne
gro la afforded excellent opportunl
tloa to become ft land owner. No
pollen opprcHfiion, ImpoHltlon or
"lawleHaneiMi" was found. Negro
worker In the Haw mill district were
reported happy and contented.
Many of the farm laborer were
found to be, working on the share
system. "Negroes having no capital,
tea in or Implement are equipped liy
the land owner, receiving, usually, n
balf of the crop they produce, while
those with team and Implement are
Xlvon two-third. The alatement con
tinue: i
"We found that the average
worker who cultivated what I
known aa the 'one mule crop' waa
able. using the year ;1918 aa a rrl
f tnrion. to produce a sufficient crop
to net htm, over and a1ovo all living
xicne. from $500 to $1500 a year.
We found several men who began
work nnder the tenant . system and
who now own their own plantations
and are themaelvea employers of ne
gro labor and are worth from $10,
"00 to $175,000. Theo fact were
secured from the negroes themselves
and we had the privilege of riding
a with them and surveying their farm
In automobile they own."
WILHOX IMK8 NOT IMPROVE
Waehlngton, Oct. 2. President
Wilson 1s not so well today. Adml
K rnl Grayson called In consultation
Dr. ' P. X. Dercum, neurologist of
Philadelphia. The president's condi
tion I not alarming.
10
Baltimore. Aid.. Oct. 2. .An effnrt
Is bolng made to arrange'for the
ion ui liib King ana queen or tiul
Klum to this city to coincide with
the sessions of the second annual
convention of the War Mothers of
America, which Is to be held here
Octdber 7, 8 and 9. 'Addresses 'by
A. Mltcholl iPalmer, attorney general
of the United States and William Ma-
thor Ijewls, director of the savings
division of the United States trons
nry, will form a principal part of
he vfogram.
DEiTH TELLS OF
K it
Kmployer, juid Kmployes Organise
With Cabinet, HemMe and House)
r0.o. IImxIn Trl. l
Cleveland, Ohio, Oct. 2. 'Discus
sing the lubor problom here today be
fore the iNatlonal Safety council of
the Eighth Annual Safety Cons rem,
K. h. iKeuerbaoh, factor manager of
Wm. JH-mwth & Company of Kleh
moiid lllll, N. Y., told of the exper
ience of that company onganlxlng Its
employee jnto an "Industrial democ
racy." The Jxtmtith company's plan I
baited on the government of the Unit
ed Hiate, with a cabinet, senate and
house. The cabinet is made up of
comyany official! with the president
of the company a chairman, and
ha veto power.
The senate J made of foremen
and heads of departments and Its
power and practices are Identical
with that of tho federal house ol
representative.
The house Is made up from the
rank of the worker with one rep
resentative for ever 30 workmen
and are elected by secret ballot. The
senate and bonne meet weekly on
company time and any question re
lating to working conditions, safely.
sanitation.' wages, etc., may be
brought up. No change becomes a
law, however, until It I approved by
all three bodies.
John Ijeltcb. author of "Man to
Man," was the originator of the De
miith plan and put It Into effect. A
dividend system was also, estab
llahed. Mr. Feuerbach explained.
whereby all savings made In the
cost of production would be divided
equallyone-half to the employes
anil one half to the company. "
Mr. Feuenbach said It required
some time to educate the men to
this new plan of factory government,
hut, iwhen they realised' that ab
sence and tardiness affected produc
tion and In turn their percentage of
dividends, they recommended penal
tie for tardiness, carlessness and
disinterested workmen, and legisla
tion to this effect wa passed.
THE "DEUTSCHLAND"
E
London, Oct. 2. Since the surren
der of the famous German cargo sub
marine Deiitschland, which created
sensation by her trip to the United
State In 1910, and back to her
home port, she has been ' overhaul
ed and now I beginning a tour of
British roast towns. She will be
open t Inspection by the public In
aid of King "George's fund for sail
or. Alterations have been made so
that visitors can pass Into the Inter
ior without having to descend the
steep Iron ladder from the conning
tower. Her guns liave been dis
mounted. The Dent soli latid waa among the
87 or more German submarines sur
rendered by Germans after the ar
mistice and delivered to British naval
authorities In fengllsh ports.
I
llllo, Hawaii, Oct. 2. A stream
of molten lava a thousand feet wide
Is flowing Into the sea' at the rate of
20vto 30 mllea an hour from the cra
ter of Manna I.oa. The virtual' river
r 20 to 30 feet ht&h and the sea Is
boiling for half a nil from' the
shore and dead fish are floating on
tho surface. ' ,
' Where the lava hits the sea the
bounders explode, but as the flow
's mostly through a barren country
the property loss Is small.
mm p
LA
JPAM, JOflEPHTXB COUHTY, OREGON, TlltlWDAV, OOTOBKH 2, J010.
EAST AND WEST .
STRUGGLE IN
STRIKE GRIP
OVHIt IN K.YGLAM) IHKIW A UK
DIIAVMKX, Willi. K POlrTLA.VI)
IMtl'NTIMKH TOTTKIt
BOTH SIDES CLAIM UPPER HAND
HU-H Yards at l'ortln Xot Vet Af-
foetal; Wage Increase Granted
to Home
Portland, Ore., Oct. 2. Union
leaders hore declare that there are
2iOU men striking In the Portland
district, but shipyard operators say
only half that number are out.
Three hundred men from the
Slandlfer corporation at Vancouver
went outf toda;
and CoLtt co
ay and the Peninsula
companies have shut
down. ,
The steel yard are not yet affect
ed. The Smith-Watson Iron Work
in South 'Portland, a repair shop,
granted an Increase In wages last
night. Twenty-five hundred men
are returning to work.
Ixindon, Oct. 2. Social lines,
which In, the past have been rigidly
held In Knglind have broken down,
for the time belnij at least as a re
sult of the railroad strike which this
morning entered on -Its fifth day. A
duke was seen driving a motor lorrie
through the streets yesterday 'while
during the day an earl was In the
chauffeur's seat in the motor head
ing a convoy of fish from Billings
gate. The 8ixth Earl of Portarllneton
was among those whose names are
found In the Social Register who
were engaged In unloading perish
able goods, milk and churns from a
train, 'while at Paddlngton station.
Earl and lady Drogheda were among
the worker. Frederick IHenry Smith,
son and heir of the first baron of
Colwyn, was the fireman on the Liv
erpool-London express when It rolled
Into this city today.
Organization of food and transport
service by the government has been
proved most effective and the re
sumption of war time rationing has
worked smoothly.
IMG ItAXK INSOLVFAT
Fargo, N. X)., Oct. 2. The Scan-danavlan-Amerlcan
bankf Fargo,
with liabilities or $1,600,000. has
been declared Insolvent by the state
banking board and has been closed.
'Cincinnati, Oct. 2. Just as a good
golfer muBl keep his eye on the ball,
so must a champion baseball player
keep Jils mind on the game. . The
ability of the Cincinnati players to
think baseball, dream baseball, talk
baseball and live baseball has made
them a pennant winning aggregation,
according to Manager Pat Moran.
"If the fellows had thought about
automtjbllea, shows and everything
else in the world but baseball they
would not be where they ere now,"
said iMoran In explaining .how his
team captured the National league
flag, and became contenders for the
world's championship. "I guess that
holds good In most any 'game you
are playing. A player must be In
terested and lie must think about bis
game. When he does this he Is al
ways up and coming, taking advant
age of every opportunity."
Pat hag been characterised as a
miracle man, wonderful leader and
PAT HORAN TELLS SECRET OF MAKING
CHAMPIONS OF BASEBALL PLAYERS
MOB FIRES ON
GOV. BROUGH
OF ARKANSAS
FIHIM K HACK WAIt IWtKAKS OUT,
JlKttl'Iri.(J J.V lKATH OF
THItKK WHITK MKJT
Omaha Itemaina Outlet ; S0 ArresU
for Inciting lUot, and Will Have
to Fate Trial
Klalne, Ark., Oct. 2. Governor C.
M. 11 rough and Colonel Isaac Jenks,
In command of troops, were fired
upyn but neither one was hit; O. L.
Johnson, a white real estate dealer,
was shot three times. and probably
fatally wounded; Dr. D. A. Johnson,
a negro druggist of- Helena, and
three of his -brothers were all killed
and two corporals seriously wounded
in a renewal of the race trouble here
shortly before noon.
" O. R. IJlly, a member of the city
council, was killed at Hoop Spur.
Helena, Ark., Oct. 2. Five hun
dred trooiis arrived at Klalne today,
accompanied by Governor iBrough.
In the race riot yesterday three
white men were killed and two
wounded. The number of negroes
killed and wounded In unknown.
Twenty of the rioters were arrest
ed and the tension is -relieved.
Omaha. Oct. 2. Tho city continii
ed quiet today after an uneventful
! night. General Wood said the crisis
had passed and he expects no fur
ther trouble.
Many negroes have returned to
work and many who left the city are
reported to have returned.
Fifty-five persona - suspected of
participation in Sunday's rioting
have been arrested and a total of
250 are to be arrested, said County
Attorney Shotwell.
"We're going to make such an ex
ample of the leaders of the moM
that the fair name of Omaha will
never again' be disgraced."
Among those arrested was C. J.
Netha'way, a realty dealer, whose
wife was found brutally assaulted
several years ago.
KING AXI Ql'KF.X AKItlVK
New York, Oct. 2. The Belgian
king and queen were given a noisy
welcome when they arrived hire to
day on the transport George .Wash
ington. so on through the catalog of descrip
tive phrases but"he modestly insists
the players are responsible for the
success of the Cincinnati club.
"I have a great ball lub that's
the whole story' lie said. "Not
only Is It a great ball dub, 'but It
Is a club of fellows who take care
lot themselves and put their minds on
their work. No maij can make good
' in any line or life unless lie has the
' Instruments to succeed with. I have
'a good-bunch of players so give them
the credit. All i did W&S tO hum
Uie boys together. They won'the ball
, games."
Followers of the Tteds, however,
will !not let Moran take a back seat
without showering: some praise on
him. They say that Cincinnati had
good players but that It took a good
manager to mould them Into &' win
ning machine. ' lAny Cincinnati fan
will swear that Pat is a good man
ager. . . ' . '
FRANCE SCHEMING
TOKEEPOUTHUNS
Find It hard Job to Combat German
Prrnlsteiu-e and ("nifllnewi; AVom-
an Plays Prominent Part .
Jrto, Out. 3. The Impending re:
sumption of commercial relations
with the enemy of yesterday Is caus
ing the French public at large a good
deal of misgiving. Man would keep
the German out at all cost, but cool
er heads realize that France cannot
afford to dose the door upon a cus
tomer of a billion franca annually.
There Is however, a fairly unanimous
feeling that If the German Is to come
back to France, he mnst come back
In some recognized shape and not
ulsgulsed as too often before.
Incidents uch as the following do
not serve to put the pnbllc mind at
ease. ' A woman of good social
standing of Lille recognised yester
day, (n th rwrwm of f carter ta one
of the big department stores of Paris,
- former German officer". She had
5ood reason to remember him as one
of the Invaders who had "been quar
tered upon her home In Lille.
Challenged as to his. Identity, the
man stoutly denied his Teutonic na'
lionallty. He spoke .French perfect'
ly; his papers were to- all appearance
In order, and the accuser at first
found scant credence on the part of
the management. Then she remem
bered that the man had once 'boast
fully exhibited his arm, on- .which
the portrait of the former German
emperor was tattooed. The cashier-
officer was dismissed and the news
papers are now demanding that em
ployers shall be held responsible for
the cfvll status of their employes.
THE PtACE TREATY
Paris, Oct.! 2. The, chamber of
deputies ratified the German treaty
today by a vote of 372 to 53.
Washington, Oct. 2. The senate
took up the 36 treaty amendments of
Senator Fall, of New Mexico, repub
lican, for a final vote before ad
journment Joday. The approval oi
mese amendment would - eliminate
American representation on commis
sions established by the treaty.
Washington, Oct. 2. The senate
defeated the first amendment by
Senator Fall by a vote of 58 to 30.
This Is generally accepted as a test
of the attitude or the 34 other sim
ilar committee amendments.
COST OF ELECTIONS
Paris, Oct. 2. The cost of elec
lons this autumn is expected to be
about three times as .high as those of
1914. This Is due to the advanced
cost of ipiinting, traveling and Inci
dentals. -
' Six hundred and two members of
the chamber of deputies are to be
elected and tt Is predicted that the
average expenses of each will .be 50,
000 francs.. '
T
Salem, Ore., Oct. 2. Dr. Clarence
True Wilson, Portland prohibition
leader announced at the state Metho
dist conference here' that Sergeant
Alvin T. York, known as the war's
greatest hero, may tour the' Uned
States, speaking against the use" of
cigarettes.
Dr. Wilson recently returned from
the East where he conferred with
Sergeant York.
WHOLE Xr.HHKR 273.
HE SOX GO
T
IE
WILUAMH PITOHB8 FOB CHI
CAGO, BIT HJ8 WILDXES3
LOSES THK GAM K
CHICAGO GOT SCATTERED HITS
20,000 People See the Game; CicottO
Explains WhUe Pitched Poor
Yesterday
Cincinnati; Ohio, Oct. 2. 'Before
a crowd officially announced at 29,-
890, Cincinnati took" the second game
of the world series today. Williams'
wfldneas contributed to the defeat of
Chicago, who onthit Cincinnati, but
they couldn't buneh their blows.
3n the fourth for Cincinnati, walks
by Rath, Groh and Duncan, and Dau-
bert's single and Kopfs triple scored
tbree runs. Chicago scored two la
the seventh on Kibergs single.
Schalk'a double and Neal's wild
throw.
Cincinnati, Ohio,, Oct. 2. Wlta
warm, cloudy weather, the world
series mam resumed today. Early in
the day the managers announced the
batteries: Cincinnati, Salee and Win
go. Chicago, Williams and Schalk.
The series Is almost sure to break
all records for money taken In. Yes
terday's receipts were $21,000 ahead
of any previous record.
CJcotte today explained the poor
showing he made while pitching yes
terday's game for Chicago, saying
that when he hit Morris Raith, the
first man np. it unnerved htm
strangely. He expects to "come
oack- later In the series.
J. Collins White Sox right fielder,
may be out of the game for the re
mainder of the season. He was ill
with la" grippe late yesterdav. 'Knnt
Cincinnati shortstop, was also III last
nignt, out evidently Is all right to
day. CWcajto
DOM
R H O A B
0 0 2 0 0
0 0 2 3 0
0 2 3 0 0
0 3 10 0
0 0 1 0
0 17 0 0
112 2 1
12 t ! ft
0 10 2 0
0 0 0 0 0
2 10 2? 10 1
Weaver 3d b 4
Jackson If. 4
Felseh, cf 2
Gandil, 1st b 4
Rlebere. ss 4
Sohalk. c. 4
Williams, p S
AfcMullin 1.
33
Batted for Will:
Cincinnati
R R TT T
A E
Rath. 2nd b. 3 10 1
0
Daubert. 1st b. . 3 0 0 1!
!
Groh, 3rd b. 2 1 A O
1 0
Roush. cf. 2 1 1 B
5 0 0
1 0 0
3 6 0
10 1
3 0 0
1 SO
Duncan. If 110 1
Kopf, ss 3 0 13
Neale, rf 3 0 1 1
Rarlden. c. ........ 3 0 1
Sallee, p 3 0 0
13 4 4 27 14 2
Chicago .4 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2
Cincinnati ..0 0030100X 4
Summary
Two base hits; Jackson, Weaver.
Three base hit: Kopf. Stolen tiase:
Gandil. Sacrifice hits: Felech, two:
Daubert, Duncan." DoiiWe plays:
Kopf to Daubert; E. Collins to Gan
dil: Felseh to E. Collins to iGandll;
fContlnued oc cage I.)
CLAIM THE AMERICANS
Washington. Oct., 2. Admiral
Knapp, commanding the 'American
naval forces In European water, re
ported to Secretary Danlele that Am
erican Intervention at Trau, Dalma
tla, prevented bloodshed which might
have resulted in a state of a'ctual
war between Italy and Jugo-Slaria.
The admiral said the Americans act
ed at request of the Italian admi
ral. The Americans were withdrawn
as soon as tihe Serbians arrived to
police the town. . ,''''?'
I