Grants Pass daily courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 1919-1931, August 18, 1919, Image 1

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    "Ifs The Climate
Were Telling The World
Come and Enjoy It'
v. 4 , : t ) i-
VOL. IX., No. iMfl.
GRANTS PASS, JOSEPHINE OOUHTT, OREGON. MONDAY, AUGUST 18. 1010.
WHOLE NUMBER' 2747.
r.
RED ARMY 100
SING TO BE
simmer n i;Hivi: or h.mal
MUTISM POIU'K IS NORTH
IK Httl PROVES FA I ll It K
Element laviw llulntit'vlkl, W ho Are
Mora I'owcrful Than Their Enemy
Both In Men anil Artillery
Archangel, Auk. 18. The Hrltlah
Ruaeliin offensive In North Ruaala,
which was Intended thla summer to
connect with Ad mini! Kolehak's Si
berian army and establish Archangel
aa a baa through which allied sup
pile might Im handled to all antl
' bolshevik armlea In the fluid, ha
mot with unnrtMMted atrong renlat
anee on tho Dvlna river at the name
time that 'Admiral Kolchuk's armlce
have been driven backward Into Si
beria. Because of Insufficient force, lark
of open aupporl by the allied gov
ernnienta and tho fact that natural
factors have aided the bolahevlkl,
tho expedition, according to military
opinion In Archangel at thla time,
nay be doomed thla aiimmer to a
failure equally aa bud aa that which
met luat summer's efforts nnlone
large forcra are thrown In at once
by the allied government! and a war
anal net the ibolahevlkl undertaken 1n
oar nest.
Throughout the long winter, when
the allies and Rtiaalam on the Arch
angel front were fighting a hard
proiiaed, defonalve 'battle against su
perlor force, the allied command
wag waiting the arrival of Bummer
to take the offensive.
The offensive began lute In June,
but no far hua advanced only a few
mlloa. Kotlaaa la atlll more than a
hundred mllos from the RuHalan and
Brltlah portions on the (Dvlna, which
aro. In fuel, only at about tho same
point where the Americana were es
tablished hint autumn before the
trong iiolxhevlk offensive cauaed
thom to withdrawn during the win
tor. ' lAJthough compnred with last sum
mor'a pitifully small force the pres
ent TlrltlHh and IRusalun command Is
well equipped, Jt la still fur below
the Htrenmh of itho bolahevlkl In both
numbers mid artillery. The British
gunboats and monitors, or which a
largo flotilla was sont for operations
on tho Tvlna and Vaga rivers, have
for tho most pnrt proved useless bo-
ranso of the low water.
Rven the British volunteer forfe
have been Informed "that they will
lm withdrawn from North 'Russia bo
foro another winter sots In. All Am
ericans and French ire now off the
Archangel front, and the newly
tral ii oil iRusslan troops, most of
whom were secured iby draft, are
limited Jo number, the territory W
Ing sparsely settled. They are, how
ever, woll equipped.
At the present time the North
"Russian government, which has es
tablished, tinder .direction of Gonoral
Kolchnk, a "strong" policy to hold
up. the discipline In the army and
mong the civilian population, Is
aeterminea to carry on the war
against the bolshevik! to the finish
and the people appear anxious to
cooperate.
ONI,V SIX KIOTO FOR 1ORT'jAX1)
FORCED
BACK
');': ',: 8an Francisco, Aug. 18. -tPaclflc
.' : . coast ports will receive only 48 ves-
!k, ' sols from the United States shipping
. . board Instead of the 78 originally
'' ,' , planned, according to statements
made today by shipping board offi
cials. A check of the vessels available
tor allocation lias reduced the num
ber iby '30 bottoms, It was said. Half
.if the ships have been assigned, San
. v . Tranelsco having received 11, Seat
tle eight and Portland six.
FARMERS SORE A
PRESIDENTWILSON
ItflmffMl by Ilia Act in Placing In.
(liiMtrlui Production Auovo Farm
' Output) Miiy I'btnl I At,
VV'arfhliiglou, Aug. 18. Warning
waa given today by representatives
of farmera orgaiilzatlona toatlfylng
before the house and aonate agri
cultural committee that uutoaa
preaent disturbed conditions result
ing from profiteering "in goods and
wagoa" and strike are nettled aoou
the country will fu.ee a far worse sit
uation from the high cost of living
next year than at present.
Farmera, they aald, were .prepar
ing now for next year'a crops and
uftder preaent conditions they could
not eall mate whut the probable mar
ket would be.
Fears wore expreaacd that there
would e decreased production botli
on thla uocount and on account of
rraldent Wllaon'a statement In hia
meHsitgo vetoing the repeal of the
daylight aaviug law, placing Indus
trial production ahoud of farm out
put. .NEW YORK cm
TIED IP TIGHT
New York, Aug. IS. Due to
tho traction employes' strike,
the city's millions are fighting
their way to work In surface
cars, or walked In the rain
storm.. The subways and the -f
elevated are tide up.
WOUNDED SOLDIERS
. OS STRANDED SMI
Seattle, Wash., Aug. 18. Cable
advice today stated that the United
State shipping board steamer. Heff-
ron, with 1,100 wounded Cxeoho-Slo-vaks
aboard, waa ashore off Rokuren,
KorcaJ strait. They are In no Imme
diate danger and veaeals are stand
ing by. The lleffron waa bound
from Vladivostok to Trieste.
Uuidou, Aug. 18. Criminals who
rob their victims after giving, them
I'driiKh'od cigarettes are attracting the
attention of Scotland Yard. In one
Instance a man In railway car
riage was robbed after he had smok
ed a' cigarette given him by a fel
low passenger. A discharged, sol
dier wus robbed of his money and
clothing and loft naked by the road
aldo near u suburban village.
SAYS AVAR XST 40
U1LLION POUNDS
iI,omlon, Aug. 18. -Lloyd George
told the house of commons today
that tho 'British government accept
ed the policy of the state for the
I ii r cli nan of milneral rights in coal.
He said the war cost forty billion
pounds, and that there waa 'an
alotmlng trade balance at present.
PARCEL POST SALE OF
IS
Washington, Aug. 18. The par
cel post sale of the vast supply of
foodstuffs the war department la
putting on the market was inaugu
rated today. Every postmaster in
the country has a price list Indi
viduals can order directly from the
postmasters,
. iPostmaster Quintan 'has received
his price list but has not yet recelv.
ed definite Information in regatd to
the xone rates. This is expected any
day, after which (Mr. Qulnlan will is
sue a notice to the public, Informing
them how: to proceed to place their
orders. Each city has been allotted
i certain amount of the stores.
MEXICO AND THE UNITED
STATES NEARER A BREAK
Army Aviators Held by Mexican Bandits For $15,000
Ransom Will be Paid and Charged to Carranza.
Uncle Sam Demands Quick Action by Mexico
i:i Paso. Texu. Aug. IS. Some
where In Mexico south of the Big
Bend district, lieutenant Paul H.
Davis and Harold C. Peterson, l". 8.
army aviators, are being held by
Mexican bandits for ll.i.OOO ran
som. The aviators disapeared eignt
days ago.
Authorities at Marfa, Tex., receiv
ed the bandits yesterday. The money
is to be paid In gold to Tawklna Kil
patrlck at 'andelarlo, Texas, by to
night or the Americana will be kill
ed. Another message signed by the
avlutor asked that the ransom bei
paid, and It Is underatood that It wlllU
be paid.
Waahlngton, Aug. IS. The al
ready strained relations with Mexico
are regarded acute, due to the avia
tors' case. Detention of members of
the military force Is considered more
serious than had they been private
oltlzens.
The state department today made
vigorous representations to the Mexi
can government.
U. S. MASSING TANKS
ALONG MEXICAN LINE
El Paao, Texas. Aug. 18. It be
came known today that the largest
ordnance depot ra the United States
1s to he established at Fort Bliss
within a short time. For the last
two weeks large quantities of ord
nance supplies have arrived and
more coming in .daily. Today's
additions to the war stores included
16 heavy tanks of the kind used in
the fighting in Europe and it was
suid ten more of these trucks are en
route liere. Complete equipment of
British type of 1917 model British
millmeter guns lor two regiments
will be part of the ordnance.
Monster trailers for transporting
artillery supplies each weighing 9S00
pounds have arrived.
Seven new steel storehouses are
to be erected.
A second depot, similar to that at
Fort Bliss la being established at
Brownsville, Texas.
(Army officers today declined to
discuss the report that the concen
tration of fighting equipment on the
Rio iirunde'wiLs due to the tenseness
of the 'Mexican situation.
Columbus, O., lAug. IS. 'Forty
eight one-man nrmored tanks of the
whilst type have been shipped from
the army reserve depot from East
Columbus to army posts near the
Mexican border, during the last two
days, officers in chatge of the depot
admitted today. Half of the ship
ment went to iEI iPaso, the other half
to San Antonio.
UKK.lt &KASON STARTS '
OFF IX 8AMR OI,l WAY
Eureka, Cal., Aug. ,18. Mistaken
tor a deer Roderick Mcdeod a ranch
er was shot and killed iby George
Dickson at Dyerville, near here last
night. The deer season in Hum
boldt county had 'been open only 12
hours when McLeod met 'Ills death
SAYS AVAlt WILL IIRSIXT
GIVING JAPAN CONTROL
Washington, Aug. 18. Thomas
Millard, American writer attached
to the Chinese peace delegation, tolu
tlhe foreign relations committee It
was the unanimous opinion of Amer
ican experts on Far Eastern affairs
at Versailles, that war must result
from the treaty provision giving
Japan control of Shantung.
Waahlngton, Aug. 18. The Am
erican embassy at 'Mexico City has
been instructed to call upon the
Mexican government for quick ac
tion. The ransom is to be paid to
day, . The United Stiles will either
furnish the sum and charge It
against the Carranza government, or
call upon the Mexican government
to pay It direct.
Secretary Ba&er said there was
some uncertainty whether the two
.aviators landed In Mexico by mis-
or. as they claimed, landed on
the American side and were captur
ed there. They were on border pa
trol duty.
Portland, Ore., Aug. 18. Lieuten
ant Davis, held by the bandits, en
listed from Portland and was sent
to Ban Antonio to train soon after
the war started, and was kept there
as instructor. His parents live at
Strathmore, Cal. His age is 23, and
he was a sophomore at Stanford.
E TO
AMERICAN LEGION
R. J. Boyd is in the city today in
the interest of the American Le
gion tbe boya whrf fought for Am
erica In the great war. Mr. Boyd
says that the state organizer for the
society, W. iB. Follett of Portland,
will arrived In Grants Pass Wed
nesday and on Wednesday evening
will hold a meeting here for the pur
pose of perfecting an organization.
The preamble of the constitution
of the American Legion reads as
follows:
"For God and Country we asso
ciate ourselves together for the fol-j
lowing purposes: To uphold and de
fend the Constitution of the United.
States of America; to maintain law
and order; to foster and perpetuate
a one hundred per cent American
ism; to preserve the memories and
incidents of our association In the
Great War; ' to Inculcate a sen66 of
Individual obligation to the com
munity, state, and nation; to com
bat the autocracy of both the classes
and the masses; to make right the
master of might; to promote peace
and good will on earth; to safeguard
and transmit to posterity the prin
ciples of 'justice, freedom, and de
mocracy; to consecrate and sanctify
our comradeship by our devotion to
mutual helpfulness."
Organisations have already been
perfected In 19 cities of Oregon, says
Mr. Soyd, and it Is the Intention to
have the state rank first In the union
by September 1st. Any man who
has seen service in any 'branch of
the U. S. army during the late war
is eligible to join. Mr. 'Boyd can be
found at the Josephine hotel and
will be glad to give any of the ex-
service men further Information In
regard to the organization.
AMERICAN ARMY OFFICER
SrFFER HEAVILY IN WAR
Wshlngton, Aug. 15. Analysis of
the "final" casualty report received
from the central records office In
France ehows that the European war
was the most sanguinary in history.
Battle deaths among American en
listed men avera&ed eight per thou
sand, among emergency officers, 11
per thousand, and among regular
army officers 14. Of every 1,000
officers landed in France more than
330 were killed or wounded. Battle
deaths were 27 per thousand for
graduates of West Point against IS
for non-graduates. '
LATEST ARTILLERY
FOR O.A.C:CADETS
Ninety War Horses W11 lie Furnish
ed, Five-ton Tractor to fraw
1Ug French Gun
Oregon Agricultural College, Cor-
vallis. August 18. A battery of
four three-Inch guns, one G. P. Fll-
loux 155 mm. field piece and a mo
dified British bored to seat Ameri
can and French, ammunition, have
been forwarded by the war depart
ment to the agricultural college for
the new field artillery nnlt author
ized. Two carriages each dralwn by six
horses constitute each of the fire
sections of tbe three-inch battery.
Four of tbe sections are made np of
the un and its caisson, . and the
fifth by a store wagori. and -battery
wagon with additional stores. It
takes 80 heavy artillery horses and
28 cavalry mounts for the officers
and non-commissioned officers. Nine
ty animals will be forwarded soon.
The big French gnu is drawn by
a 6 ton tractor under war condi
tions 10 ton. Ammunition is served
by steel tracks. Two 5 ton and two
2H ton tractors have already reach
ed the college.
For fun drill sub-caliber charges
are fired through a shell model with
rifls bore. The .bullet will strike
the target 600 yards distant just as
the heavy projectile, if fired, would
have struck Its target. Without this
device gun drill could not 'be had be
cause of the great range and heavy
projectile of the guns.
Two year of basic drill will be
required of all students in the artil
lery courses, and two , additional
years will be offered candidates for
reserve officer training corps posi
tions. CHOPPING HELPS HAT
Corvallls. Ore., Aug. 18. "You
will save 25 to SO per cent hy run-
Ing your hay through a cutter this
year." says E. I Westover, U.- S.
ana u. A. c. extension dairy special
ists. "The saving is far more than
the cost of chopping the hay."
TRAVELS BY OX TEAM
Prosser, Wash., Aug. 18. Driving
an old-fashioned ox-team in a! new-
fashioned manrfer, Mr. and Mrs. G
W. Dingham have just passed
through (Prosser and expect tft reach
Spokane the tore part of next week.
Mr. and (Mrs. Dingham are en route
from Giendale, Ore., to Garwood,
Idaho, about 40 miles east of Spo
kane. They have already been a
month on the road.
Mr. and Mts. Dingham created a
sensation at the city camp grounds
which is filled 'by .transcontinental
tourist partise every night. The ox
team found accommodation under
neath a giant walnut tree alongside
a half-dozen high powered automo
biles and the contrast between pio
neer travel in the days of '51 and
the present fashion of eating up the
distance between tbe east and the
west was very striking.
FOREST FIRES
Portland, Ore., Aug. 18. Fifteen
hundred acres of forest have been
burned, and three camps and many
donkeys were destroyed by fire near
Stlverton. The loss is esttmated at
8350,000.
a Tire in tne santiam forest on
Dry Creek, five miles west of De
troit, is alarming. Government men
and loggers are fighting It.
. iA rain is needed to stop the fires
in the Roseburg section.
Near Grants iPass there are several
small fires, but none are reported
to ibe ibeyond control. - . -
NEAR
Bom
EVACUATING
THE UKRAINE
SOVIET GOVERNMENT AT HOS
COW BIIANIJS KObCHAK AND
CABINET AS OUTLAWS
ODESSA .CITIZENS OUST REDS
Budapest SorialisU Refuse to Ria.
cognize Frederick Government
Utile Archduke Stcfw Down
London, Aug. 18. The bolehevlkl
have been driven from Odessa by
the population of the city. It Is re
ported. The soviet forces are evac
uating Kiev and the entire Ukraine.
London, Aug. 18. A decree
do
th. daring Admiral Kokshak and
AR-Russlan cabinet at Omsk; to be.
outlaws was issued today by the so
viet government, a Moscow wireleasr
says. j
'Budapest, via Vienna, Aug. 18.-
Paul Garami, tbe socialist leader
and other socialists announced to
day that they would refuse to enter
the new government of . SteDhea
Fried rich, unless Archduke Joseph
Abandoned the" regency.
WINS IN TEN MILE SWIM
DOWN DELAWARE RIVER
Riverton, N J., Aug. 18.-r-Eugene
T. (Bolden, a sailor of the Great
Lakes naval' tralnlng'statlonr" od
the ten mile national swimming "
championship in the Delaware river
late Saturday, setting a. new record
for the event. His time- was 1 hour
59 minutes and 18 seconds. He de
feated 28 men, among them some of
the best swimmers in America.
ADMINISTRATION ASKED TO
ADJUST WAGE DEMANDS
Washington, Aug. 18. The rail
road administration lias been noti
fied that the shopmen's strike is at
an end, and is urgei to take up the
wage demands immediately.
ESCAPED CONVICTS SEEN
NEAR FREEWATER, ORE.
Salem, Ore., Aug. 18. It is re
ported that 'Dave Brichoux and E. B.
Southwick, escaped convicts, were,
seen Friday near Freewater, Umatil
la county, in a small automobile
headed toward' Walla Walla.
OF
KILLED Iff MATH
Corvallls, Aug.-18 An average of
139 dead grasshoppers was counted
for each square foot of poisoned
area in the upper marsh district of
the Klamath agency as a result of
the control campaign recently con
ducted by E. H. Thomas, county
agent. Many sick hoppers were also
found throughout the area. The
farmers who spread the poison were
mostly stockmen who came so near
ly cleaning up the district that they
have planned to begin early next
year and complete the job.
WILL RETAIN OREGON
AIRPLANE PATROL
Salem, Ore., Aug., 18. Senator
MoNary has been assured by the war
department that airplane patrols will
be retained In Oregon. The Senator
has notified Governor Olcott. ' "
FORECAST FOR PERIOD OF
AUGUST 18 TtJ AUGUST 23
Washington, August 16. Pacific
Coast States; 'Generally fair; normal
temperature.
I