Grants Pass daily courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 1919-1931, August 16, 1919, Image 1

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    "Its The Climate
We're Telling The World
Come and Enjoy Itf
1K1
o
m
I 'nlvcriHy of Oru. Library
IIS DIN
WHO HAD SHOWN
HIM KINDNESS
MONVKt JOIIXHO.N MlKIMCItH
miw. fkkemax at i-oictlaxi)
with a oah p1pk
.SERVED TIME JIT ST, QUOTH
Mrs. Frwwan Waa W. V. T. U
Wurkor nil 1 1 utl (iivntt Johnson
Home; lUthltcry Motive
Portland, Ore., lAug. lfl.Tlm po
of alt coast cities have been
asked to lookout for Clarence Johii'
on. i-eonvli't at fit. Quentin, In
connection with the murdor of Mrs
Runic Freeman. W. C. T. IT. work
er, aged 88 years, who waa found
murdered bora last night. Her akull
waa fractured by a gas pipe. 'Rob
bery waa the motive.
Mrs. Freeman had helped Johuson
out of prlaon and ha had lived with
the Freemans until recently. He lef
bla position at Che shipyard yester
day and disappeared.
A neighbor eaw Johnson leaving
the freeman flat yesterday. Mrs.
Freeman recently told liar eon that
he would want to kill Johnaon if he
only knew what Johnson had aald
to her, the police learned today.
T
NEXT MONDAYEVE
IHm1i Matthew SIiuimou HiiKhoi
1). I)., L. U. I)., of the Methodist
Kpiscopa) church . will arrive In
lirunta I'biOi sometime Monday and
will speak Iti .Newman church at 8
o'clock Monday evening. ,
'DbjhOp Hughe hua not( announced
hi topic, hut it will doubtless be
some outHtandlng topic of the duy.
Ho la a pant muster In. the art of
liundlltiK vital subjects In a clear and
forceful manner. The opportunity
of hearing him should not bo missed
by anyone. A local attorney who
hua heard ttlshop Hughes in the emit
la loud m nit praises or turn aa n
apeuker. und was very enthusiastic
on heuriiiK thut be 'was coming to
; rants I'mkh. tAlost year's graduate
of .Willamette aald that tho bishop's
address on behalf of the senior class
last June wan one of the finest ever
dollvered before the student of that
liiHtltutlon.
pinhop Hughes waa ejected to the
Episcopacy four years ego. 'He hne
been pastor of some of. the largost
nhurches of ..Methodism, east and
went. HIls father wan a minister he
fore him and he has a brother who
la also a (bishop of the Methodist
church resident in iBoston.
The bishop comes to Grants Pass
from Med ford where he spea'ks Sun
day night.
Everyone la urged te come and
hear Wm 'Monday evening. If you
wish to secure a good seat, come
arty. There will Iba no collection
or raising of funds.
FOR AERIAL SERVICE
IRoseburg. Ore., Aug. 16. ln the
"belief that an aerial mall route will
he established between San Francisco
'a'nd Portland within a year, and also
that 'the forest patrol will be perma
nent Roaeuurg citizens at a meeting
today took the first steps to establish
a .permanent landltig field here. "
A .committee was appointed to
draft plans. It wan suggested the
city purchase the temporary field
now In use and erect hangars for
the planes.
HUN NAVYCONSISTS
OF TORPEDO BOATS
0
Once Powerful Fleet of Warriors
Dwindle to Few Utile llout lo
Maintain Order
With the American Forces in tier
many, Aug. 16. The Germane have
orgnnlxed two flottllaa of torpedo
boats alnce the armistice end thwie
onatltute virtually ell the warships
loft In active service in the German
navy, according to information re
colved here.
One of these flotillas hi described
in Mlttachlffa, a German naval per
lodlcal which haa roached the Amer
lean headquarters as the Iron Tor
pedo Boat Flotilla. It consists of
II torpedo boats which, the period
tool says, have been engaged In main
talntng order on the western coast
of Germany. '
Some of the vessels of the flotilla
have been used on several occasions
for police work in the port of Ham
burg, doing duty guarding allied
food shipments to the Csecho-81o-
vaks and similar work during periods
of disorder. The flotilla has its
headquarter at Wllhelmahavon. A
landing corpa of about $60 men is
distributed among the 12 boats, each
of which has a.' platoon of SO com
manded by a naval lieutenant. The
clothing and arms of members of
this landing corps are the same as
In the infantry.
The other group of veaaels called
the Half flotilla la supposed to he
doing similar duty on the Baltic
coast near the Russian boundary,
with headquarters in Koenigsberg.
The boat are armed with machine
guna, and In some oases with 3.7
centimeter guns as well.
ARIZONA PLANNING
FOR NKW HIGHWAY
Phoenix. (Aril., Aug. 15. A plan
for financing the highway from
Phoenix to Yuma, Arizona, consider
ed one of tho most Important road
projects with which the Salt River
valley la concerned, haa been an
nounced by State Engineer iMaddock.
The proposed road would connect
with the California system of paved
roads and would place Phoenix ex
actly 386 miles from tidewater at
San Diego.
MEDFORD FISHERMEN
J
iA. now run of steelheads is on In
the river and the fishing 'la growing
hotter. Fishing o far for some rea
son, has been poor compared with the
past few years, (but while there has
been somewhat general complaint
about thla condition it will be no
ticed that some of the real fisher
men ere making rather good catches.
Jonas Wold caught two fine steel-
heads teat night, and one evening this
week Frank 'Isaacs caught seven and
F. (Roy (Davis seven. Carl iBowman
who returned laat Sunday from his
two weeks vacation spent on the
river, caught many big fellows and
sent tho proof In to ithe city to a
number of his friends. iMedford
Tribune.
WILL WHITE HISTORY .
OF NATIVE ALASKANS
Juneau, Alaska, Aug. 16. All the
way from Norway bat come Dr.
Kreyberg who baa Interesting theory
regarding the similarity between the
oarvlng, faces, animals and figures
drawn by the natives of .Alaska atid
the drawings of he Egyptians. ,
HARRY ALLEN HEADS ELKS
Klamath Falls, Ore., Aug. 1.
Harry S. Allen, of 'Portland, was
elected president of ihe atato asso
ciation of lEtka here today. Salem
will get 1920 convention and Marsh-
field 1921.
Salem,. Ore., .Aug. 16. Clothing
believed to have ibeen discarded bv
convict Brochoux as be fled south in
an automobile, was discovered by a
armor near Jefferson today.
y?-86' A9mKm OOXrKTX ORUJOPf. SATURDAY, AUGUST lfl, 191.
UD SCENE
OF WILD RIOTS
AND LOOTING
TICOOPH CIIARGK 5IOH8, HIT
AUK MKT WITH HEAVY VOL.
LKY OF HTOMX
NATIONALISTS DISLIKE VALERA
Fire Tar Barrels Under His Picture
and Slug War Songs; Orange,
men Get in Action
J-ondonborry. Aug. 16. Rioting
and looting occurred here last night
and early today. Troops chaj-ged on
the mobs, but fired no shot. The
soldier were met with a volley of
stones when they attempted to break
up Nationalist demonstrations.
The monetary low from the loot
ing la estimated at thousands of
pounds. The trouble started when
the Nationalists set fire to tar bar
rels beneath an eroh over which was
the picture of Edward DeValera,
president of the Irish republic. The
Nationalists sang soldier songs, the
Unionists responding toy singing the
national athem. Soldiers kept the
crowds apart and the Nationalists
were finally driven !ack to ' their
own quarters.
Belfast, Ireland. Aug. 16. Ten
Nationalist excursionists were Injur
ed during a fight with Orangemen
at Lisburn. County of Down. There
waa serious rioting also at Coal
Island, in the county of Tyrone.
CRUISERS CAN ENTER
LAKE WASHINGTON
Seattle, Wash., Aug. 16. Some of
the vessels of America's new Pacific
fleet may next month be floated
through the (Lake Unlon-Puget Sound
lot ks here. Once through the locks
the vessels can cross take Union and
proceed through a canal into take
Washington.
The Seattle locka are said to rank
only second In size among North 'Am
erican locks to those at 'Panama
m t m n n. .
ouipe u ieei long can .'be nut
through tho locka liere. The con
trolling dopth for imsslng Into take
Union from the sound la 29 feet and
the width 100 foot.
All the destroyers cf the new fleet
and a number of the smaller cruis
ers can be moved through the locks,
WOOL RATE SUSPENDED
Portland. Ore., Aug. 16. Word
has been received here that Con
gressman Slhnott baa Induced the
railroad administration to suspend
the new wool rate to Pacific North
west points', recommended iby the
traffic committee, until a hearing
can be held at "Washington with
Northwest wool mien present.
RED BATTALIONS ARE
WIPED OUT IN NORTH
London, Aug. 16. Several battal
ions of bolshevik! troops have been
wiped out In the new counter offen
sive of the Northern .Russia army
the River Luga,. southwest of Petro
grad. The Soviet foroes also lost
many, prisoners and machine guns
and ammunition. ' '
OPEN SEASON
ON PROFITEERS
IS
OOVKKAMKNT AGKNTS ACTIVE
IX VAST, CEXTIUIi STATES
AMI TUB FAK WEST
Twenty Million Pounds of Meat Held
for Months at St. Louis; Storage
Plant Packed
Kansas City, Mo., Aug. 16. Seventy-five
thousand pounds of beans
have been seized here. Federal au
thorities said the 'beans bad teen
stored throughout the war.
San Diego, Cel., Aug. 16. The
seizure of food stores in cold stor
age tiere tias begun on warrants Is
sued out of the Los Angeles federal
court.
Detroit. Mich., Aug.' 16. In the
second raid on the Detroit Refriger
ating Company's plant here, federal
agents seized over 7,000,000 eggs
and S00, 000 pounds of batter.
St. Louis, Mo., Aug. 16. Twenty
million sounds of meats were report
ed to bare been seized late today
when federal authorities raided the
Sooth Cold Storage company bare.
Large stocks of eggs, cheese and
other foodstuffs were also said to
hare been located.
Officials bad not yet learned who
owned "he stocks.' Account of the
supplies taken bad not been com
pleted.
BREAK ALL RECORDS
New York, Aug. 16. More indus
tries are affected by strikes now go
ing on or threatened In tuts city
than ever before in the history of
labor unions, according to figures
compiled by labor leaders and made
public today.
iBeeidee the actors and railroad
Lshopmen, those now on strike In New
York Include painters, plasterers
machinists, carpenters, shopmen of
the 'Brooklyn Union Gas company,
cigar makers! brass workers, shirt
makers, furriers, brass bed makers,
umbrella;, makers and art lamp work
ers. A nation-wide building strike,
taking 1, GOO, 000 men out of work,
was threatened in a statement Issued
yesterday by 27 international beads
of labor unions. The trouble is the
outgrowth of charges that building
contractors employ non-union labor.
WOULD PENSION OLD PEOPLE
Washington, Aug. 16. iPluns for
old-age pensions for persons more
than 65 years of age, were proposed
in a bill Introduced today by Sen
ator McNary. republican, Oregon,
and referred to the pension commit
tee. Under ' its v provisions persons
with incomes of not more than $6
a week would receive a weekly pen
sion of $4.
ROUMANIA NOT TO GET
SLICE OF HUNGARY
.Paris, Aug, 16. The supreme
council's note to the Bucharest gov
ernment states that iRowmania will
not be allowed to strip Hungary of
foodstuffs. The fixing of reparation
to be made by Hungary is a matter
under the control of the allied and
associated powers.
he
sun
7,000,000 EGGSAT OETROIT
CARRANZA SPITS
AT THE BULLDOG
Peeved at English, Who Refuse to
Recognize Mexico Until Guaran
tee for Protection Is Given
Washington, Aug. 16. William
Cu minings, British charge d'archives
la Mexico City, has fceen ordered to
leave the country by President Car-
ranza.
It 1a understood that Carranza'f
action was due to a statement made
by the Sritlsh under-aecretary In the
house of commons recently, to the
effect that Grant Britain . would not
recognize the Oarranza government
until some guarantee was given that
British lives and property would e
protected by Mexico. Mr. Crammings
had so cfficial status In a diplomatic
sense, out the Incident will certainly
nave a matted effect on Enrland'a
policy, It is believed.
OF
SETTING OUT
Three young men of the Butts
Falls district were held to the' grand
jury by Justice Taylor at their pre
liminary hearing Thursday after
noon In bond of $500 each, which
they furnished. The accused men
are Charles Drexler, James Johnaon
and David Smith. The evidence
against them was purely circumstan
tial and they did not testify nor pre
sent any defense. .
The charge was brought by T. M.
Talbott. federal forestry service ex
aminer, who in his affidavit charges
that on August 2 they deliberately
started several fires 1 nButte Fails
territory near the junction of Buck
creek and the south fork of the
Rogue river on the timber land of
the Rogue River Timber company.
The evidence of the prosecution
showed that three tires were start'
ed about 160 yards apart with four
or five minutes Intervening between
each. The forestry lookout in that
locality at once discovered the fires
which vere extinguished before they
had spread very far and did much
damage. Medford Tribune.
The work of repairing the -coffer
dam at the plant of the Irrigation
and Power company at the "Golden
Drift dam which has been under way
for some weeks, has been completed.
Engineer Sprout and bis crew of men
today started work on the foundation
for the additional concrete work and
general repair of the dam.
DEATH PENALTY WAS
Douglas, Arizona. Aug. 16.
Though death' has Ibeen the penalty
pronounced by iGeneral P. Ellas Cal
lee, ! governor of Sonora, Mexico, for
the making or selling of liquors in
that state, ipubllc sentiment was so
strongly against the decree that.
while arrests were being made in
other iparts'of the state, in the capi
tal, Wermoalllo, recently liquor never
was more plentiful nor cheaper since
prohibition first went into effect in
1915.
Americans Teaching here recently
from Hermoslllo said beer was being
sold at $25 gold a' case of 60 pints
and tequila was selling at '$5 a quart.
During the period when the death
penalty was In force until It was re
pealed early in July,' not a single
execution had taken place.
Salem, Aug. 16. Governor Oloott
goes to Salt ILake tonight to the gov
ernors' conference. W. T. Vinton is
acting governor.
WHOLE NUMBER 279.
RAILWAYS
NEED HELP TO
GET ON FEET
WILL FORM SOLID FOCXDA.TIOX
FOR AMERICAN PItOSPKIUTr
IF GIVEN FAIR SHOW
SIX PER CENT M IS URGED
Many Schemes Offered for Return of
lines to Private Ownership From
tbm Govern naenl
Washington, Aug. 16. 'Advocates
of the Warfield plan for reorganiza
tion of the railroads on a basis that
would pay holders of stock a flat
minimum return of 6 per cent closed
their ease today before the house in
terstate commerce committee.
Forney Johnston of advisory coun
sel of the National Association of
Owners of Railroad Securities, spon
sor of the plan, and Samuel H.
Beach, president of the Savings
Banks' Association of New York, dis
cussed its provisions at an all-day
session of the committee. Both de
clared the plan could be made ef
fective with the return of the roads
to private management without dis
turbing business conditions. Mr.
Johnston said a steadying band most
be extended to' the railroads after
the period of government control If
a foundation for American prosperity
was to be built
In denying the more or less popu
lar belief that railroad securities
were owned largely by wealthy peo
ple, Mr. Beach asserted that haU the "
people of this country were concern
ed directly In the welfare of the
roads and demanded a law that
would afford reasonable compensa
tion on invested capital. ' ,
' The committee baa not yet reach
ed the top of the hill in its big task
of heariqg proponents of all plans
and of reporting out a bill. - Be
ginning next week, representatives
of the railway executives' advisory
committee will be heard, along with
other witnesses who want to see the
roada turned back at the end of the
year, on the same basis aa hereto
fore, except with added regulations
as provided In the bill by Chairman
Each.
"If congress does not take courage
ous and constructive action now,"
said Mr. Johnston, appearing in be- '
half of the 'Warfield 6 per cent re
turn plan, "the progress of a gen
eration toward a well-regulated sys
tem of privately-owned and operated,
railway transportation will be des
troyed and the 66th congress wlU
have forced government ownership
under conditions and with results
which the future alone can assay." '
PltOHI ENFORCEMENT BILL
UP IN SENATE NEXT WEEK
-Washington, Aug. 16. The house
prohibition enforcement bill as re
drafted by the sub-committee was
ordered favorably . reported to the
senate by the judiciary committee.
It will be called up tor senate debate
next week.
EDITORS SEND SIX
CENTS TO PAY FORD
Seattle, Aug. 16. "United we'll
ride In high-priced cars, divided we
will have to ride in flivvers. There
Is nothing penurious about Oregon.
We would have paid it bad the
armount been twice what it is yes.
even three times."
So declared the members of the
executive committee of 'the Oregon
State Editorial association today as
they drew a bank draft for 6 cents
to send to the Chicago Tribune as
a tender to Henry Ford for the nom
inal award made htm by tho Jury la
his suit for libel. ....