Grants Pass daily courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 1919-1931, August 15, 1919, Image 1

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    -WE'RE TELLING THE WORLD-
COME AND ENJOY IT
VOL. IX., No. 844.
GRANTS PASS, J08EFHI"B OOUNTT, OREGON, FRIDAY, AIGIST J, 119.
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vada Voiir Very Fireside
Now York. iAug. 16. Phonographs
wilt tie used by both the republican
ltd democratic parties in tbe ap
proaching presidential campalK". It
la announced, tho plan embracing a
program which will penult the real
donta of small towns and remote
hamlet to hoar the spoecho of em
inent oratora at the Mint time that
the records are released In the In rite
cltla.
The phonographic campaign will
be opened on September 1, when re
cords containing utterances by Attor
ney General Palmer, speaking for
tho democrats, and others rsglsVsr
1ng the upeech of United States Sen
ator Lodge, voicing the sentiments of
the republican, will be released.
Those speeches will he reproduced at
club, societies' headquartors. at
churches, noonday meetings and In
the home of the party workers.
following the release of the
speeches of Attorney General Palmer
and Senator l.odge.' other records
will be distributed monthly and It
la erpected that the meeting places
and homes throughout the country
will fairly echo and re-echo with the
words of the orators as conveyed by
means of talking machines. The ex
tent of the part which phonograph
may play In the campaign can be es
timated by the statement that two
manufacturers of the machines ate
known to bave more than 2,000,000
phonographs In use In the United
State.
Among the speakers scheduled for
phonographlo oratory by the demo
cratic national committee are Presi
dent Wilson, Secretary of War Ba
ker, Secretary of the Navy Daniels,
former Secretary of the Treasury Mc
Adoo and William J. -Bryan.
Former President Tart. Major Gen
eral Wood. Bllhu Utooi. Chaunocy M.
Pepew and United States Senators
Johnson mid Borah are on the list of
apoakers chosen for talking-machine
oratory by the republican national
committee.
1.1 AITOS Ill'llNKD
IN KLAMATH FIRK
Klamath Palls, Aug. 16: A
garage fire last night burned
45 cars, some of them belong
ing to visiting Elks. Tho blaze
did $50,000 damage, with only
$12,000 Insurance carried.
GEN. LIGGETT STRONG
FOR AIRPLANE PATROL
ON WH
TUHG 1CK Will BUT
Salem, Ore., Aug. 15. General
Hunter ILIggett, commander of the
western department of the army, has
Informed Major lAJbert Smith, com
mander of Oregon forest patrols, that
he favors extending the patrol over
Oregon,, western Montana and North
ern Idaho.
' Seventeen more planes wll be
added to the forest patrol force In
few days If the plans are approved
In Washington.
Thirty-four fires have 'been dis
covered. In Western Oregon to date.
The (forest fire situation on the Mo
Kenzle river 1a more serious today,
several of tho fires being beyond
control. - - .
SCIENTISTS VILL
EXPLORE AMAZON
Uracil Friendly to KxMllUon That
Will Kern Out Vmuicrdnl Pos
sibilities f (inl Hive
l'urii. iTirajsll, Aug. 15. The end
ing of the world war has given a new
Impetus to the work of opening up
the great reservoirs of natural
wealth, from gold to fruit and valu
able woods, which lie In the valleys'
of tbe Amazon. Several expeditions
of exploration are being organized
here, one of the most Important of
which Is under the direction of Henry
S. Fleming of New York, United
States customs receiver at Para, who
will shortly start on a three months
trip devoted to exploring the com
mercial possibilities of the vast re
gion watered by the Amaxon and Its
maze of tributaries.
'President Pessoa. the newly-elect
ed head of the Brazilian republic Is
reported to Intend devoting consider
able attention to the work of sani
tation In the Amazon valley and has
expressed his Intention of affording
every governmental protection to In
vestors who help to develop Brazil's
natural resources and to encourage
desirable colon lets. The region com
prises an area of 2,000,000 square
miles, almost five-sixth the extent of
all Europe, and Us rUmatlo condition
Is almost Identical to those of south
ern Europe.
The only Industry which has been
developed to any extent up to the
present has been the production of
rubber and this Is now In an unsat
isfactory condition owing to the com
petition of the Orient which has re
duced the .price of the product be
low a profitable margin.
'President iPeesoa has frequently
spoken of the United States In most
enthusiastic and friendly terms since
his return 'home and comment In
the newspapers throughout the
re
public shows that Brazilians are
looking to the United States more
than to any other country for finan
cial and other aid which they need
In the development of their national
resources.
L
FOR ROAD TO CAVES
Philip H. Hater, of Portland, dis
trict engineer of the forest service,
was In the city today In conference
at the local forestry office. Mr. Da-
ter went to Medford this afternoon
to meet T. W. Norcross. assistant
chief engineer of Washington, D. C.
These 'gentlemen will visit Crater
Iake, the Applega'te section and oth
er points and will return to Jose
phine county early next week.
On their return to this county Mr.
Norcross and Mr. Outer will visit
the Oregon Caves, going over both
the Wfnin.mii and the (Holland routes
to Aerdde upon which route will be
of accommodation to the greater
number of people. It Is probable
that both routes will eventually be
opened up by the one most needed
will claim the first attention.
The district office has recommend
ed that preliminary surveys of a road
to the caves be made this fall 1n or
der that detail office 'Work In con
nection with the surveys may be
completed during the winter.
iMr. 'uater says lie can give no
Idea as to the time when work will
be commenced on the road as that
Is a matter for the forest service and
the state highway department to
work out, state aid being a requisite
for federal appropriation. . ....
STRKKT RAILWAY EMPIiOVKS
AND MINERS WIMj STRIKE
Los Angolos, Aug. 15. Employes
of all branches of the Pacific (Elec
tric railway system will go on strike
tomorrow. The street, railway .em
ployes are also voting on whether to
strike.
.Wallace, Idaho, Aug. lfi. IFdHteen
hundred Coeur d' Alone miners are
out on strike today. They demand
more pay. ' ,
REPUBLICANS
ARE READY FOR
RATIFICATION
OKMOCUATH ARK KO INKOItMKI),
HIT UICHKUVATIONH WILL UK
I.VSIHTin) I' POX
PALMER'S PLANS ARE HE10 UP
HU-nograplilo Records of the Confab
Between Wilwm and the Commit
tee to lb Made Public
Washington, iAug. 15. Over 20
republican senators are ready to
stand for quick ratification of the
lMace treaty with reservations, dem
ocratic leaders were informed by
loadors of the republican group res
ervation advocates, although admin
istration leader Hitchcock disclaimed
any part in the negotiations for set-
tlvmeut. Tbe move has apparently
reached tbe point where it threatens
the committee plans for prolonging
the consideration of the treaty.
Senator H Hancock talked with
President Wilson late today.
Washington, Aog. 15. Action on
amendments of the food control act
suggested by Attorney General Pal
mer to reduce the living costs was
blocked in the senste agricultural
committee. Chairman -Gronna hopes
the committee will act finally by
next Tuesday.
Washington, Aug. 16. Stenogra
phic records will be made of the con
ference between President "Wilson
and the senate foreign relations com
mittee at the White House Tuesday
In discussing the treaty. The pres
ident has informed Senator Lodge
and suggests that the committee al
so have a stenographer. It is un
derstood that the official transcript
ill be published.
OREGON GOVERNOR TO
SALT LAKE OONPKREM'K
Salem, Ore., Aug. 15. Governor
and Mrs. Ben W. Olcott will leave
here Saturday for Salt Lake City,
Utah, where the governor will attend
a conference of governors.
gov. oLtxrrr appoints
PILOT COMMISSIONERS
Salem, .Aug. 15. Governor Ol
cott has re-appointed Captain Wil
liam McNaught of. Portland, and
Thomas Nelson of Astoria, and ap-
iwintcd J. B. Speler of Portland as
members of the state 'board of pilot
commissioners.
GREAT FOR
Juarez, Mex., Aug.' 15. Francisco
Villa's method of evading pursuit by
Mexican government troops Is almost
Identical with that used by a covey
of quail to escape the hunter. Even
the detail of protecting color has
been applied by Villa' for his men al
ways wear brown cotten clothing
which blends with the desert land
scape and dust clouds through which
they travel In campaign.
Hunters know that the quail In
stinct directs it to scatter when dan
ger approaches, seeking cover in the
nearby landscape. ' Villa and his reb
el bands do the same -thing when a
superior federal column approaches.
Often Villa's band will number 2,000
men tinder his chiefs, lAngeles, L6
pet, Dial and Garcia, They make a
column -which coils across the plains
Itke a giant snake and leaves a great
cloud of dust In Its wake, ttnt lot
! General Castro's government troops
approach with artillery, machine
guns and cavalry mounted on for
mer American army horses and the
column will break up Into little
VILLA
sa, as m
HUNS AWAY TO F
ALLIES Will
HOLD AUSTRIA
RESPONSIBLE
MIST lUiTlHN BfcLA KTN, HUN-
GAIUAN COMMUNIST LEADER,
FOR TRIAL BY TRIBUNAL
UP FOR HANGING AND SHOOTING
Prague Hears That Socialist Want
to Form Monarchy in Czechoslo
vakia, Headed by Con naught
Geneva, Aug. 15. The allied gov
ernments have informed the Austrian
government that H be held re
sponsible for Bela Kun, the Hungar
ian communist leader, and for bis
delivery later for trial by the allied
tribunal, a dispatch from Innsbruck
says. Hs Is to be tried for hanging
and shooting Hungarians during his
reign.
Geneva. Aug. 15. A Prague dis
patch says a large section of the so
cialists are desirous of working for
the creation of a monarchy in
Czech-Slovakia, and that the Duke of
Connaught, uncle of King Georee. is
choice for the monarch. The Duke
Is "probably unaware of the honor."
WILSON VETOES RILL
. 4
Washington, Aug. 15. -Pros-
tdent Wilson today vetoed the
daylight repeal bill.
RELENTLESS FIGHT
ON THE PROFITEERS
I Columbus, Ohio, Aug. 15. Forty
warrants, charging Ohio food dealers
with hoarding and profiteering, were
Issued today by the State of Ohio.
Arrests will be made Immediately,
the attorney general said:
Governor Cox will ask federal au
thority to confiscate 2,000,000
pounds of meat and poultry in cold
storage, which has been held longer
than required by the state law.
Portland,, Ore., Aug. 15. Federal
agents here are working on two
cases involving hoarding and profit
eering. It was announced today. Li
bel warrants are expected to be is
sued and the stock seized. The price
fixing committee is to issue weekly
bulletins and hold public hearings.
THE SPECTACULAR,
IGHT
OTHER
DAYS
bands of 100 under petty, chiefs, will
disappear in some mountain canyons
and go Into hiding until the federals
pass. Once the danger of attack is
over the column reassembles, occu
pies some town In Its path and again
disappears with Its loot.
Villa's men have been known to
hitch thedr horses to plows In the
fields of the irrigated districts and
be industriously plowing when the
federal scouts appeared. They nave
learned various tricks of deception
during the years of evading the fed
erals and even drive a herd of bur
ros with them so they mav transform
themselves Into wood vendors on oc
casion. During the Pershing expedi
tion It was claimed by Mexicans that
Villa himself stood in Namqiupa dis
guised as a peon, with a blanket
wrapped to, his eyes and watching
the (Pershing column pass through
the town in pursuit of Mm. This has
'been dented and its source question
ed but Villa has played many equal
ly daring tricks on his Mexican mili
tary enemies.
THE FIRST MODEL
RANCH
HOW READY
Bute's First Land Settlement I nit
Will Re Turned Over to Settler
on Easy Payment
Independence, Ang. -15. Oregon's
first model land settlement until be
ing developed by the state land set
tlement commission two . and one-
halt miles from Independence on the
Oregon Electric Railway, Is nearly
ready for occupancy. lAe soon as It is
completed the farm will be assigned
to some bona tide settler on easy
payment terms to be fixed by the
commission. ,
There are 60 acres In the tract,
Vail under cultivation. The commis
sion has built fences, constructed a
barn, Implement shed, chicken house,
hog bouse and a modern farm bun
galow with running water, sanitary
plumbing and other conveniences.
The land Is well adapted for diversi
fied farming such as hay, grain, ber
ries, fruit, vegetables, hog-raising.
poultry-raising or dairying.
The Oregon land settlement com
mission, consisting of Whitney L,
Boise and Emery Olmatead. of Port
land; Charles Hall of Marshfleld; O.
H. Baker, of Bend, and (Robert N.
Stacfleld. of Stanfleld, and W. H.
Crawford, secretary and manager,
will make an Inspection of thl farm
during the coming week and will ar
range details for turning it over to
a settler.
'Oregon Is the pioneer In the land
settlement work," said W. H. Craw
ford, secretary and manager of the
commission. 'It has been our pol
icy to do what we can -with -what we
have, and -we have followed this pol
icy closely. Instead ot going into
this thins Independently, we looked!
around for aome help in getting
things started, and this help we
found in the department of farm
management of the Oregon Agricul
tural college, of which H. D. Schud-
der has charge. We hare received
the active cooperation of the farm
management of the college through
out, and it has been extremely help
ful."
When the commission purchased
the 60-acre tract last spring the
ground was plowed . and sowed to
wheat and vetch and a bumper crop
has been raised and is now being
harvested and placed in' the barn for
the man who acquires the ' farm.
Everything in connection with the
place has been done along the most
practical lines.
The commission plans, to utllze the
rest of the $50,000 placed .in" its
hands by the state in the develop
ment of other model farm units
throughout the state. As soon as
the work on the first unit is com
pleted it will develop units along
similar lines in Central, Eastern and
Southern Oregon and one in the
coast counties.
HOY SCOITS KILLED
London, Aug. 15. Nicholas Av-
gerldis, a scoutmaster, and 20 Greek
Boy Scouts have been murdered at
Adln, Asia Minor, by Turks, accord
ing to Greek official sources.
Avgeridis was tortured before he
was killed and the Boy Scouts lost
their lives In endeavoring to save
him.
it
Butte, Mont., Aug, 15. The sec
tion of Montana from which the
fighting 91st division of the army
took its battle cry, "SPowder river,
let 'er buck" has not been scratched
by religion, according to the iRev. B.
H. Ungef elter, of Butte, who toured
the Powder river section in south'
eastern Montana, without being able
to find a single church. The all
Protestant home mission. It was an
nounced, will urge the establish
ment of a church in the Powder
river country.
JURYAVARDS
HENRY Fd SIX
CENTS DAMAGE
TitOCBLE BEGAN IN 1916 WHEN .
CHICAGO TRIBUNE SAID "FORD
IS AN ANARCHIST"
TRIAL mm THREE" MONTHS
Report That Ford Was Trying to Di
courage Recruiting Started Flams j
That Besulted in Libel Salt .
- . r
Mount Clemens, Mich., IAug. 15.
The jury today awarded Henry
Ford six cents damages against the
Chicago Tribune.
It was on, June 23, 1916, after
Mexican bandits had raided Colum
bus, K. M., and military, prepared
ness was' a burning issue, not only
because of the Mexican menace but
because of the conflagration in Eu
rope, that tbe Chicago Tribune print
ed its famous editorial beaded" Ford
Editorial writers of the Tribune
testified that they had followed ilr.
Ford's paclfistic propaganda, but
had not recognized it as a real dan
ger to the country until a news item
was received from Detroit that Mr.
Ford was trying to discourage the re
cruiting of the guard which had been
ordered to the EJo Grande. The
I. .A. . T a I .V - A .
Hem. luiucuuuu vl wuiui wo ve
nted by Ford witnesses, stated, that
the Ford company would not pay the
salaries ot employes who went to the
border, hold their places tor tnem,
nor care for their dependents.
It was then that the editorial was
written. It called Mr. , Ford an
"ignorant idealist" and remarked
that his views on disarmament might
be different (f his factories were on
the (Rio Grande instead ot the peace
ful Canadian border.
A feature of the case was the pro
duction by the defendant of more
than twenty witnesses from the Mex
ican border to testify to raids, mur
ders and other acts which to tho
mlnd of the Tribune counsel estab
lished the fact that there was a con
dition of anarchy along the border.
Professor Reeves of ths 'Unhrerelty
of Michigan, appearing as an expert.
testified that many ot the Ford uter-
ances corresponded with the teach
ings of "well-recognized anarchists!
He gave definitions of the word "an
archist" which contained no refer
ence to bomb-throwing, but which
denoted one who works to overturn
the government.
Counsel for the defendant argued
that government exists only so far
as it can enforce its decrees and pro
tect the lives and property of "Its cit
izens, that without force there can.
be no government and that where
there is no government there is an-
achy. Therefore, they sought to
establish that la opposing the re
cruiting of. soldiers. Mr.' Ford noos
ed government itself, and, by the
same token, sought to establish an
archy. ' "
The amount ot costs Mr. Ford can
receive from the Tribune will not
exceed $50, as only nominal costs
can be assessed under the law where
damages, are nominal. , ,. .
SHIP TO BE RAISED
Juneau, Alaska! Aug. 15 AttemDt
Is to be made by a salvage company
to raise, the treasure ship Islander,
wrecked August 15, 1901, between
Douglas and Admiralty islands,
southeast Alaska. The Islander,
which struck an Iceburg and was
sunk with the loss of 39 Urea, was
valued at $175,000. and carried a
cargo estimated to lbs worth nearly
$1,000,000.