Grants Pass daily courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 1919-1931, July 28, 1919, Image 1

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    3 v I ('
VOI.. IX., No. KM.
(HUNTS PASS, JOSEPUINB COUNTY, OREGON, MONDAY, JULY SH, 1910.
WHOLK NUMBER 2720.
report shows
improvement
city finances
AI IHTOU ALLVX REPORT MX
DEPARTMENT ItEOt IRINU
lens than ii iK.irr
fl AUTO BONDS ARE CALLED
FumU .Now on lliuul for l'ii)inciit of
' i $f,noo or it) itoiiiimi iu-
llllltllt"l
Auditor .11. II. Allyn- bus iiiiiiIo it
uml-annial statement of tha coudl
Uou ot the oily of tiruul Pa tlu
iiout which lie Imit presented to tlio
c,ll council which ihow some Intwr
oatlntf figure.
The disbursement exceed unu-hif
uC Ilia yearly budget by only $14. US.
Bix department general, police,
flro, llhrury, irk and water mid
JighlliiK department expenditures
were low thun one-half of th yntr
ly budget by it total or $529.92. but
tba sanitation, street unit Hewers.
iil upkeep of 'iibllc building ex
ceeded the buln"t for the Imlf year
by $ r 4 a . 9 7 . Th sanitation ilepa rt
m out exceeded by $fiH.85, due prln
Tti Uy to tha flu epidemic Tbu
at reel tul wiwoih exceeded by
H0.J9, while $28. 73 was spent for
upkeep. In the budget there was no
.provision for upkeep.
In thu gitueral government there I
credit to the budget or $ 1 3H.C2;
iNilicw department, $1.90; flro de
lmrlimnil. $3111.13: library. $70.(7;
parka, $40.00; water and lighting.
ISB.5I; total. $529.92.
The cash receipts were: Flue, li
censes, etc. $ ill 1. 3:'; improvement
Olid liens, principal. $4,433.89; in
terest, $1,020.43: received from
nomily treasurer, $25,267.13: total
aah rernlpta. $31,813.47.
Warrant outstanding January I.
1919. $8,977.59; warrantn Issued
lurltm six months. $11,157.22; to
tal, $20,134.8 1. Increase In war
rent Indebtedness In alx month,
J90.36.
Improvement bond Indebtedness
January 1, 1910, $77,833.26; bond
Ild In alx months, $2,070.40. To
tal Improvement Imnitsi o ti t t n n l j n n
.Inly I. 1819. $75. 1 5.Hfi.
Miinlcipul bonds outstanding:
Hull roil il bond. $200,000: funding
'boiiiln, $KO,000; newer bondM, $13.
000;" fire auto .bond. $5,500; total
outstanding bonds July 1, 1919,
$298,500. Honda nld during alx
months, newer bondM, $3,000; total
bonds. $5,67 0.
Tlio treasurer lias called the fol
lowing bonds to be paid, Interest to
cease July 1, 1919: Improvement
omnia, Sixth street, $1500; sower
ootids, $IT00. He has also called to
lie paid August 17, 1919. fire auto
'bonds, $."..5(10, a total of $8,500,
'bonds now called" for .payment. The
payment of tlio fire auto bond
leaves the flro department out of
debt excopt for the balance due on
auto tire en (fine jiump recently in
itialled. iPayments of $100 monthly
aro being- made on the pump.
AMERICAN FIRMS MAY
'Cohlenz, July 28, 'Amorlcan
.rmy hoadquarters permitted- five
.American commercial ' tra'velera to
liroceed through the Coblent bridge
head Into the Interior ot Oermany
today. ThI permit American firms
to compote 'WlthTEuropean for the
Oormnn trade.
1IKIU,I BANK NOTUIOWS
ONK HVNDUFI) MIIXION
H-ondon, July 28. An iAmerlcan
loan ot $100,000,000 has been ob
tained by a rapresentatlve of a Ber
lin bank, It 1 announced.
COMPILING RECORD
STATE'S SOLDIERS
Mini librarian lla (1uirK of Iin
IH.rtimt Work Will Distribute
Medal
The official record of every Oregon
soldier serving In the world war la
being compiled in the state llbary
here, under the direction of State
Librarian Cornelia Marvin, who was
authorized to make the compilation
by die recent legislature. ' From
those record' will be made the dis
tribution of service medals, schedu
led for November 11 next.
The work of compiling these re
cord was begun laat March, and,
although It Is nut exin-cted that the
compilation will ever be complete, It
Is planned to have it a complete as
practical under the circumstance
well before tlio first anniversary of
(hn signing of the aYmktilc.
lllanks have been sent out to every
scImioI district In the state, and
county librarian are working in co
operation with Mia Marvin. The
record will also le checked by
school district of which there are
more than 3000 In the state. In or
der tha none of the Oregon men
in ii y be omitted.
Among other iioluta to be' covered
In the compilation are the nativity of
each Individual, tils occupation be
fore the war, whether or not ho saw
foreign aervice, the "manner of hi
entry Into the service, whether by
enliatmont or draft, and hi rank and
honor In the aervice.
lt la expected that the compilation
111 contain the names of at least
35,000 Oregon men. Number of
photographs are also being received
nd the record will eventually be
published and kept on rile In the
permanent archive of the elate li
brary. Aside from this, a compilation will
be made of the name and record of
all Oregon citizen serving in war
work other than combatant, such a
Red Cross, T. If. C. A., Y. W. C. A
K. of C, Salvation Army and any
other line of endeavor which we es
sentially a part of America' war
program
The local work 1 In charge of
Counly School Superintendent Alice
Itacon, Home Service Secretary Mr.
Jennie Mobs and Mrs. R. K. Wood
son.
IIAI.TIMOKK MAX AI'IHIXTi:i
VMIAVIA lti:i I'lUW WOHKKIt
Huchnrest, June 27. Captain Wll
Ham Warfleld, of Haltlmore. ha
been appointed director of the. Am
erican IRed Cross unit to Albania
succeeding .Major .Albert W, Ruck
who ha returned to France. Cap
tiun . Warrield will he a' force of
nearly 50 American workers.
BANDITS GET 1500
Washington, July 28. Acting on
the advice ot the "Mexican govern
ment, which feared the 'boy would
be murdered, John West Thompson.
American ranchman, paid 1500 pesos
ransom demanded 'by IMexIcan 'ban
dits for the release of his 14 year old
son.
Secretary J-nmlng today said the
Mexican government has agreed to
refund the amount of the ransom
and will malte every effort possible
lo capture the ibandlts.
Philip Thompson, H-yeafr-old son
of John West Thompson, an Ameri
can citizen, was kidnapped from his
f ither's ranch $0 miles from Mexico
City and Is "being held by Mexican
'jandlts for 1500 pesos ransom, the
tate deportment was advised Satur-
lay. Urgent representations -have
been made to the Mexican govern
ment, It was announced.
The bandits took a horse and a'
revolver from the boy before taking
Mm from the ranoh and thev iwere
said to have threatened to execute
aim unless tne ransom was paid.
PESOSTOR RANSOM
RACE WAR ON
IN CHICAGO'S
"BLACK BELT"
DHOWXIXO OK NIXiltO LAD AT
ISATHIXO REACH I'HrXII'l.
TATKA TIHM Itl.K
BLACK KICKED Off OF RAFT
Two Iilucks Killed and 50 White
nd Illarka Injured In Chicago
lUota l.t Night
Chicago,' July 28. Trouble be
tween whiles and negroe wa re
newed In Chicago' "black belt" to
day when Moses Thomas, a negro,
fired several shot at a wagon load
of white workmen being taken to a
(outhslde factory. "When attempt
were made 'by white to disarm
Thomas a dozen negroe rushed to
hi assistance. Police reserve were
rushed to the district and the dis
order wa quelled with no injuries.
Rioting last night resulted In the
deaXh of two nogroea and the Injury
of 50 whites and blacks. Including
four patrolmen.
The trouble I alleged to have
started when a negro boy on a raft
crossed an Imaganary boundary line
between w hltea aud blacks at a bath
ing beach. While boys, It la report
ed, threw itones and knocked him
Into the water, where he was drown
ed. A general race fight ensued.
STATE LIME PLANT IS
CLOSED FOR SUMMER
C. W. Courtney, superintendent of
the state lime plant near Cold Hill,
accompanied bf 'Mr. Courtney, left
thla morning by automobile on a
trip through Douglas'and Iane coun
ties In the Interests of the lime out
put. The plant has been closed
down until about September 30,
when deliveries of lime are to be
rommenred. As the plant requires
a total of 20 men for Its operation,
Mr. Courtney says It is Important
that there should lie shipped at leaHt
one car of limestone each day In or
der to reduce overhead expense.
County Court May Ketail I.ime
Ground limestone may be supplied
by the county courts of Oregon to
farmers at cost. (Procedure Is ex
plained In chapter 118, session laws
1919 as follows:
On petition of 60 or more farm
owners ot the county the court must
order at least one car lot 30 tons
from the state plajit at Gold Hill.
The IJme -will be stored in a suitable
place and sold to farmers for cash
IfttifflHont In wiwr all cnata Tha&A
costs are $2.60 per ton Incar lots
at the iplant, freight charges of $2
per ton to Salem other points in
proportion and handling and stor
age unless provision Is made to have
the car unloaded by the farmers Into
their own 'wagons. . If stored the cost
to the farmer -will be about $,5 per
ton at Salem and other points a like
distance from Gold Hill.
The advantages of this plan are
that farmers can get Uime in less
than the minimum car lot from the
plant, a.'nd by having It stored can
reduce the cost ot hauling home by
taking back a load of lime with them
whenever they haul a load of farm
produce to market.
The law mentions the fact that the
plant must be kept running full ca
pacity In order to produce round
limestone at lowest cost. This plan
of distribution will thus help keep
down the cost and also supply, lime
In quantities aulted to the farmer's
needs.
All orders should be addressed to
Dr. A. O. Cordley, seoretary of the
I state lime board, Corvadlls,
PACIFIC FLEET
QUITS PANAMA
FO AN
Kill
"BKWJIvHT KVK.NT IN HIHTOUY OV
CAXAI,M 8AVH ;OVKKOK
HAKDIXU
KlaKNlilp New Mexico Uad 81 x
Ih-nodnaughU to Water of the
Pacific
Panama, Canal Zone, July 28.
The pacific fleet sailed from Panama
for San Diego last night.
Aboard the Flagship 17. S. S. New
Mexico, July 27. The Pacific fleet,
under the command of Admiral
Rodman Is floating in Pacific waters.
Six dreadnaughts. led by the flag
ship New Mexico, Saturday success
fully negotiated the Panama canal,
the largest ships that ever have
paased through this waterway. The
average time for each warship from
Colon to Balboa was ten hours.
"This is the biggest event in the
history ot the canal," sudd Governor
Chester Harding of the Canal Zone.
"It was no more trouble than put
ting through the canal a fleet of
Great La&es tugboats." said Admi
ral Hodman.
General IiOgan Womens , Relief
Corps on Saturday held al most in
teresting meeting at which 10 new
members were received into the or
ganization. Other applications for
membership were received and there
are still others to follow. The corps
now has a membership ot about 120
but the leaders confidently expect
aii enrollment ot 1 50 'before the end
of the summer. .
At the close ot the meeting the
members ot the G. A. R. and a few
Invited guests partook of a banquet
at -which 70 or more were seated.
There 'were the silk flags which al
ways deck the tables where the W.
R. C. serve and there was the usual
abundance of good things to eat, to
gether with the hospitality for
which the organization is famous.
The annual encampment ot the
G. A. IR. and W. R. C. will be held
this yeat at Columbus', Ohio, and it
Is expected that a large delegation
from this county will be in atten
dance.
POrR -STORY OAUAC.K HAS
ENTRANCE OX EACH FLOOR
Los Angeles, Cal., July 28. A
four-etory garage, from any story of
which entrance and exit is directly
from the street, Is one ot the archi
tectural landscape oddities of "auto
mobile row" In Los Angeles.
The explanation Is simple: The
garage is built on a hillside.
L
T OF
Washington, July 28. Senator
Poindexter Introduced a! resolution
today for Investigation by the fed
eral trade commission into the oper
ations, ot big oil companies of the
Paoltle coast, and thq causes for the
recent advance In the cost of ipetro
leum products throughout the conn
try. The resolution vai referred to
a' committee. Senator (Poindexter
'would have the commission deter
mine if there is any combination in
restraint of trade or unfair competl
tlon on the Pacific coast.
HOUSE QUITS VH1LE RESERVATIONS
SEIIATE DISCUSSES
Senator Walsh Hy Article 10 Would
Xt Handicap Freedom of
toe Irish Peoole
Washington, July 28. The house
ha decided to take a recess from Au
gust 2 to September 9, -while the
senate is expected to be working on
the peace treaty. The senate has
passed and sent to the house the
administration Wll authorizing the
Increase from 9,500 to 18,000 In
the number of commissioned officers
to be retained In the army this year.
The president began the discussion
of the peace treaty with democratic
senators today, . holding abeyance
further conferences with republican.
Washington, July 28. Democratic
senators who conferred with Presi
dent Wilson late today said that the
presided? would submit the treaty
with France to the senate immedl-
aely, probably tomorrow.
Washington, July 28. Senator
Walsh, democrat, of Montana; today
denied that Article 10 of the cove
nant would handicap the cause of
Irish freedom or fix eternally the
boundaries of nations. He said It. is
clearly meant to protect each other
from "external aggression."
OF
Leavenworth, July 28. William
D. Haywood. I. W. IW. leader who
has been, released pending an ap
peal, plans to return to Chicago and
then make a tour of the country ap
pealing to worklngraen. He said,
"Our organization is mis-judged. We
did not oppose war -with Germany
and never resorted to violence. We
are victims of a newspaper war.1
LIFTS BAN FROM SOFT
Washington, July 28. After two
hours ot debate while the tempera
ture hovered around the 100 degree
mark the house today voted to re
peal the .10 per cent tax on soda
water and ice cream.
XRX,A.ST FOR THE PERIOD
JYIjY 2M TO Al t!. 8 1XCLVS1VE
Pacific Coast States: 'Normal tem-
lerature and generally fair.
T
Washington. July 28. Refusal
of the war department to lend the
state ot Oregon 1,000 gab masks to
be used in fighting forest fires is
likely to start some legislation pro
viding that the thousands of masks
left over from the war be placed at
the disposal ot the proper authorities
in the wooded areas of the country
where they can be put to some use
ful service.
P. A. lEUlott, Oregon state fores
ter, made the request for the-masks
through Senator Chamberlain who
was somewhat surprised to be in
formed that the department was
willing to sell the masfis at $5 each
Answering the request the chemical
warfare service said that these
masks had iproved valuable in fight
ing tires and that many of them are
now Hn use by the fire-flghtlng or
ganizations ot municipalities.
The war department has laid down
a set ot rules under -which applica
tions may be made for the purchase
Of the masks.
ARE ADVOCATED
Bf C.E.HUGHES
RELIEVKU ADOITIOX OF PEACE
COYEXAXT OOIXD BE
GUARANTEED
INTERPRETATION T0.4CLA0SES
Immigration and Imposition of Iu
. tiea to Remain Quetttion of
Domestic Policy
Washington, July 28. That the
adoption of the league of peace cove
nant by the United State might be
guaranteed by the addition of a num
ber of reservations to the instrument
ot ratification, is the opinion of
Charles Evans Hughes, as expressed
by him in a letter to the (Honorable
Frederick Hale, of the senate body.
Mr. Hughes told Senator Hale, of
Maine he feared the senate would
fail to ratify the peace treaty with
the covenant as at present, and he
said, "there la plain need for a
league of nations."
Mr. Hughes believes that four
clauses of the covenant need the
addition of reserving or interpret
ing statements, which would remove
the United States from danger in
case of ratification, if the statement
were attached to the instrument it
self. Article I, which provides for
the withdrawal of a member; article
XV. which deals with phases of the
Monroe Doctrine; and article X,
which provides for "war against ex
ternal aggression." should be furth
er qualified before ratification, he
say.
Aa to the possible reservation
themselves Mr. Hughes wrote as fol
lows: 'First: That whenever two years
notice of withdrawal from the league
of nations shall have been given., as
provided in article I ot the covenant
cease to be a member of the league
at the time specified in the notice,
notwithstanding any claim, charge
or finding of the non-fulfillment of
any international obligation or any
obligation under said covenants
provided, however, that such with
drawal shall not release the power
trora any debt or liability theretofore
incurred.- x
Second: That' questions relating
to immigration, or the imposition ot
duties or imports where such ques-'
tions do not a3i9e out of any interna
tinal engagement, are questions of
domestic .policy, and these and any
other questions which according to
international law are solely within
the domestic jurisdiction are not to
un Buuiuiiiea ror me considerations
or action ot the league of atlons or
of any of Its agencies.
Third: That the meaning of ar
ticle XXI of the covenant of the
leagueof nations is that the United
States of America does not relinquish
its traditional attitude toward pure
ly American questions, and is not re
quired by said covenant to submit its
policies regal-ding questions which It
(Continued on Page 2)
3D
E
Coblenz, July 28. The Third di
vision 'American army is ordered
home, it is reported here today. The
division iwitt begin entraining tor
Brest August fi.
HUNGARIAN SOVIET TROOPS
ROUTED BY RUMANIANS
Vienna. July 28. Hungarian so
viet troops have been thrown back Jn
disorder across the Thelss river by
the Rumanians at Szolnok and at
other points, it is reported today.