Grants Pass daily courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 1919-1931, January 24, 1919, Image 1

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VOL, IX., No. 72.
LEON TROTSKY
NOW PRISONER
OF ESDI
IHBPATCH SAYS BOLHIIEVIKI
MINISTER Il! NOT K8TAPK
AFTER LATK HATTLK
LOSE MORE BATTLES
lUmUti by Mthunian Soldier, Who
CkiKiiTO 0,nM lrlH,.ii-r, M idi
Light lm
Basel, Juri. 24. Leon Trotsky,
the Bolshovlkl mtnlntnr of war, did
not rat-ape from Nana after the TSb
thonians defeated the Bolehevlkl,
"bat waa taken priaonor, according
to Llbau dispatches.
Paris, Jan. 24. Lithuanian troo
Inflicted a heavy dfnt upon the
Bolshovlkl near Kosnodary, midway
between Kovono and Vllna. It In re
ported. The casualties of the Bol
ehevlkl wore heavy, 6, GOO prisoners
twlnn taken. The I.llhuanlana are
advancing toward Vllna. Their
loser are said to have been light.
GERMANS INSULT l S. FI.AO
American Headquarter In Ger
many. Jan. 20. The American flat
baa been submitted to the ultimate
In Insults. t
Coble'ni dealera have teen dls
vred selling watch fobs made or
Iron crosses on which were replica
of American flags. Army official!
confiscated all these stock and are
seeking the manufacturer. One re
taller haa been arreated.
NEW POLITICAL PARTY
FORMED BY THE IRISH
Dublin, Jan. 24. A new political
association, called the 'iiiah Center
party, has been formed. It stands
for homo rule within the British em
pire similar to other Hilt lata domin
ions and embraces the Constitutional
Nationalists and Southern Unionists.
e ;
FROM YANK'S FACE
Dos Molnos, la., Jan. .24. Court
ing do'sth In. cliislies . with ' lioclio
pianos In the clouds or toying with
fute In fantnstlc aortal acrobatics has
driven iho once constant smile from
the lips 'of Captain "I3ddle",'Rlcken
bacher, ace of American airmen In
France. . ,
This Is dlHclosod In a photoKraphl
of the alrmnn, with his nuichiae,
JUHt recnlved by a friend of Rlckeh
bachur's auto racing days, when ho
resldnd In Des Moines. Ills fnco
now seams grim nnd sot.
'"The, smile of days gone by has
faded considerable as you will no
tice," he contesos In an accompany
ing note. "This 1s my 220 horsepow
er Spad which I have had 18 vic
tories with. Am feeling bully and
hope to be back in God's Country
gain soon. Expect to arrive on the
Jlhlno. In another week."
130 UNIONS TO VOTE
Soattle, Wash., Jan. 24. Members
of ISO union affiliated with the cen
tral lobor council, are preparing for
m vote -for or againBt a general strike
on February 1; In sympathy with the
shipyard worker. .'
MONARCHISTS
11
PORTUGAL
Garrison at tlio Capital Joins the lie.
volUtrs -rolico Colled and Clah
I Imminent
Mudrld, Jan, 24. A monarchy
has been proclaimed In Lisbon, the
capital of Portugal, says a dispatch
from Valencia. Most of the Lisbon
garrison Is reported to have gone
over to thj monarchists. Reports
say the monarchist movement is
apparently making no headway In
the southern part of Portugal.
The police forcos of the south
have been marshalled to be used
against the northern forces.
40,04)0 MINISTKUH TO
TAIJt.VHTOHY UAKDKX
Washington, Jan. 24. Forty
thousand ministers covering every
denomination In tbo United Slates
have been requested by the National
War Gurdon commission to aid In'
the campaign for victory gardens.
The commission suggests that on
Sunday, February 2, the message of
the Importance of home food pro
duction should be carried to the con
gregation. COMMON STRAY DOGS
PLAY big part in war
London, Dec. 29. (Correspon
dence of the Associated ' Press.)
Rngland' dog Army rendered gal
lant service In the war. Many a sol
dier owe his life to some poor, un
cared-for, stray dog. For nearly two
year dogs were employed by the
British as messengers, a sentries
'and as guard. ' "
Baity In 1117 a war dog school pf
instruction was estabiisned by tne
British war office,' and Lieutenant
Colonel Richardson, who haa devot
ed his life to training dogs for mili
tary" and police purposes, waa ap
pointed commandant of the ' school.
Game-keepers, 'hunt servants and
shepherds were called up from the
army to assist in the work of in
struction. After a thorough training in Eng
land, the dogs were sent to France,
and on the battlefields their skill,
courage and tenacity amazed the
army. Of ton 'wounded In the per
formance of their duties, they never
faltered while strength remained to
carry on. The official record of
their horolo work tells of successful
message carrying through darkness,
mist, rain and shell fire over the
most difficult ground. In a few min
utes' time dogs have brought mes
sages over ground that would take
a soldier runner hours to cross. -
During the great German advance
last spring part .of the British line
In front of a famous French town
was cut off by severe enemy barrage.
A messenger dog was released with
an urgent appeal for reinforcements.
It ran two miles in ten mlnutos. The
result was that a French colonial di
vision was sent up and prevented a
disaster.:' The "messenger' whb a
Highland sIuep clog.
Another , dog with a message ran
nearly four miles in 20 minutes, and
stlir another In the same time car
ried buck.' from the front a map of
an Important captured position,
when a man would have' taken an
hour and a half to bring' it In.
The dog which, have been found
moat successful in war work are col
lies, Bheep dogs, lurchers and. aire
dales, and crosses of theso varie
ties, while In a number, of car.??
Welsh, and Irish terriers have' given
excellent rosults. ' ' ,
The work of sentry dogs has been
valuable, especially in the Balkans.
One gave warning' of an enemy
soout 800 yards away. On many oc
casions dogs have given warning of
enemy patrols long before, the sol
dier sentries were aware of their
presence. '
Large numbers of (logs have beon
used ifor guard duty; many pn the
Italian front.
OKA NTS PASS. JOSEPHINE COUNTY, OREGON, FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 1010.
ALLIES WARN
APPLY FORCE
HI'OII AN ACT WOULD PREJCDICE
CLAIMS AT FINAL PEACE
SETTLEMENT
Will Determine Strength of. Guard
on ltitrn Front Wilson May
Head Leagno of Nation '
Paris, Jan. 24. The allied and
associated' powers have decided to
send a wireless message throughout
the world, warning 'all concerned
th'at parties using armed force to
gain possession of territory to which
the peace conference would be asked
to determine their claim, would "ser
iously prejudice" the claims of those
using force.
The supreme council appointed a
committee to inquire Into the
strength of force to be maintained
on the western front during the ar
mistice.
Parts, Jan. 24. President Wilson
will likely be offered the presidency
of the commission of the league pf
nation of the permanent executive
body for the conduct of the league
according to the Echo De Part.
Paris, Jan. 14. Tomorrow' star
slon of the peace congress will be
open to the press, like the first sea
sion. international legislation on
labor will be the first subject to
come up for discussion.
100 PER CENTAMERICAN
. Honolulu, T.H., Jan. 24. R. H.
Trent, representative ' In Hawaii of
the enemy alien property custodian,
announced recently that the total
value of enemy-owned . property
lakeu over here by his office was
about 115,000,000. More than $1,
000,000 in cash has been sent to
Washington and 13,000,000 more
will be sent ' within the next six
months. Besides this $1,700,000
has been Invested here In Liberty
bonds. German subjects were heav
ily Interested in the Hawaiian sugar
industry, which has been made "100
per cent American" according to Mr.
Trent.
JAP "PICTURE BRIDES"
Honolulu, T. H., Jan. 23. Ac
cording to advices received here by
the Nlppu Jlji, a Japanese daily
newspaper, Immigration societies of
Japan are advocating several modi
fications of the regulations now gov
erning Japanese immigration to the
United States and other countries.
One change asked Is the extentlon
from a year- and a half to three
years of the period allowed for the
return to the United States of Jap
anese who have gone to the home
land for a visit. It Is said that
there Is now in Japan several thou
sand Japanose who cannot return
to Hawaii because they have over
stayed the time limit.
; Another change proposed is ' to
permit Japanese picture brides ' to
obtain passport for the United
States immediately after their mar
riage has been reported to the Amer
ican authorities. At present a pic
ture bride muBt walt in Japan six
months before she can leave to Join
the man she married by mall.
WORLD NOT TO
NEW MEASURE
AIMED, AT. THE
HI Mj STRIKES AT EVERY FORM
OF MONOPOLY AND MAY BRING
OX BATTLE ROYAL
"Handed Out Over State Like Pop-
plea" Would Abolish Child Wei.
fare Commission
Salem, Ore., Jan. 24. With an
emergency clause attached, Senator
Thomas and Lachmund introduced
their anti-trust bill which is predict
ed will precipitate a battle royal.
While the bill Is primarily directed
at the "cement trust' the language
Is general and strikes at every rorm
of monopoly. It was drafted by the
attorney general and patterned after
the South Dakota act.
Salem, Ore., Jan. 24. Dr. George
Rebec, of the University of Oregon
a member of the child welfare com
mission, told the Joint' ways and
means committee that tiny, helpless
homeless babies are handed out in
Oregon like puppies; He advocated
the abolition of the child' welfare
commission and the passage of bills
Introduced by Senator Farrel and
Mrs. Thompson (or the care of de
pendent, delinquent children. The
measure call for a $6,000 appropria
tion.
Salqm, Ore., Jan. 24. The state
engineer has been informed that the
Langell River Irrigation district in
Klamath county has been organized
The project covers 20,000 acres, the
water to be taken from a government
reservoir at Clear Lake,' C1.
PORTLAND PITY 1
HEAVY HIT BY STORM
Portland, Jan. . 24. Howling
winds and torrential rainfall, leav
ing in their wake giant landslides,
tempestuous creeks and rivers and
toppled trees, early yesterday virtu
ally marooned Portland completely
from the rest of the world. Con
siderable damage has resulted . to
telegraph, telephone and transporta
tion lines. In some instances train
service out of Portland Is entirely
shut off, and in others serious delay
is experienced. All lines are work
ing unde'r slow orders because of
threatened danger, from unexpected
slides and fallen trees.
44 0. A. C.
LIVES FOR COUNTRY
Orotrnn Aericnltiirnl Onllnce. f!nr
vallls, Jan. 24. A gold star in the(
college Bervlce flag represents Paul,
Lorenz of Grants Pass, as one of
the 44 O. A. C. men who are known
to have died for their country.
Information on the war service
rendered by college men Is being
compiled by ;H. M. Tennant, registrar,
and will be published In the special
war edition of the Beaver, the Junior
class annual, next spring. Fourteen
of the 44 men are known to have
been killed in action or to have died
of wounds, while 18 died of Spanish
Influenza or pneumonia.
S Two star represent faculty mem
ber. Dr. W. X. Phillips, college
physician, -with the title of . first
lieutenant in the medical corps, died
of pneumonia in an eastern hospital.
First Lieutenant Mark Mlddlekauff,
of CorvallU, instructor in bacteriol
ogy, met death In an airplane' acci
dent In France. '
MEN
BOARD
OF HEALTH
GIVES DATA OH FLO
Shows That Three Ihiys After Big
Gathering There In Always In
crease of Sickness
The state board of health has
sent the following Information to
county and city health officers:
' A careful analysis of all, data ob
tainable in regard to the present epi
demic show the following striking
features, from which most valuable
deduction can be drawn In consid
ering control measures:
Three day after; an unusual gath
ering of people there Is an increase
in the number of cases reported.
Thus, every Tuesday is high be
cause of Saturday and Sunday ming-
Hngs; the 28th of December . was
high following Christmas; the 3rd
and 4th of January -were high fol
lowing New Year's festivities. There
fore there should be no unnecessary
or unusual gatherings. Of gather
ings, dances constitute the greatest
number of cases. Dances therefore
should be prohibited during the epi
demic. .
The waves of the epidemic run in
about three week Intervals. " A
study of the causes of this and the
matter of carriers, indicate that
many cases remain carrier for a
period of two or three weeks. The
greatest number of severe cases dur
ing a wave are -able to be np and
around In about three week and
are unconsciously spreading , the
disease causing the next . wave.
Therefore,, in addition to the . ten,
days quarantine, each recovered case
should wear a mask for a period of
two or three weeks In the nresence
of" unexposed persons, and all per
son coming in close contact with
the sick should wear masks. Masks,
to be effective, should be sufficiently
large to completely cover the nose
and month. They should , have at
least eight layers . of gauze -and
should be sterilized after three
hours use. Sterilizing is easily ac
complished by dropping the mask In
boiling water for ten minutes.
It has been discovered that the
disease is being spread to a greater
extent than has been realized by
utensil used in eating and drinking.
Therefore all dishes, cups, glasses,
knives and forks, etc., used in eat
ing or drinking in all public places.
r:,. (Continued on page I.)
DESERT THEIR FARMS,
OIL MAKES THEM RICH
Dallas, Texas, Jan. 24.-$-Some of
the west Texas farmers who desert
ed their homes last summer in piti
ful white lines of old prairie wagons
are now going back In automobiles.
Driven out by a three years drought,
they ate going back as oil men.
Stretches of land where the
drought had virtually withered every
leaf of vegetation and from which
the disheartened farmers departed
for the cotton fields and other more
prosperous sections, are within the
new oil district.
Some of the farmers who strag
gled, almost penniless, from the
"parched zone" a few months ago
can .qualify as oil magnates, accord
ing to Vance Muse of the Fort Worth
Chamber of Commerce, who has just
completed a tour of Ranger, - East
land, Cisco, Breekenrldge, DeLeon,
Moran, Gorman and other towns In
the heart of the new oil district. He
says the population in many coun
ties, almost completely deserted last
summery has reached unprecedented
figures. i .
Leases are being sold for a few
acres at vastly larger sums than en
tire larms would nave brought a
year ago and enormous investments
nave been made.
NOT TAX STOCK DIVIDENDS
New York, Jan. 24 United States
Judge Julius M. Maver decided in a
test case today that stock dividends
are not subject to federal income
tax under' the Income tax law of
1916'. .
WHOLE XUMBER-2S78.
SEN. SHERMAN
ATTACKS FOOD
RELIEF BILL
SAYS, HE BELIEVES PART OF
MONEY WILL BE USED TO
IIS PRESIDENT TOO EASY
Despite the Senator's OHUcUm, Sea-
ate Passes the Bill and $100,
000,000 Is Appropriated 7
Washington, Jan. 24. Attacking
the $100,000,000 European food re
lief bill. Senator Sherman, of Illi
nois, republican, declared that it
was his belief that some of. the
money waa to be used to feed the
Russian Bolsheviks and added that
the peace conference Russian policy
supported his opinion...... .., ,
. Senator Sherman' declared the
president intends a great publicity
campaign on hi return, to work up
sentiment for the Immediate ratifi
cation of the peace treaty, including
the recognition of the Bolshevik gov
ernment. ' . ,
The president's recent statement,
when asking for the $100,000,000
appropriation, that "the sttnatlon 14
Europe could be won by food hut
not, by arms," is causing some of the
senators to .beUeve . that he intend. .
trying to form peace terms with the
Bolsheviki and to secure their recog
nition, at the peace congress.
In the face of Senator Sherman'
attack, the senate passed the house
bill for the relief of Europe and the
near east, appropriating the $100,
000,000..' !.-. , ro i . ?r ?ti 'c t '
EVEN MILWAUKEE IS.,.
SHYING FROM GERMAN
'. -.f.u ' ( ; - si . .-J v : '.
Milwaukee, Wis., Jan. 24. The
teaching of the .German language In
Milwaukee grade schools may disap-
nnar on H rl v vhon th nnw umMtt,
begins, in February. , In. only, one
school in the city- now. is German
being taught: and, .under the resolu
tion of the school board, abolishing
foreign language instruction, it
would be discontinued at the end of
the term in June.
In 1916, 200 teachers were em
ployed to give instruction in the
German language to 30,000 pupils
and at the end of 1918, only one
teacher was employed to Instruct
400 pupils in the German language.
L
rurimuu, ure., juu. it. me Wil
lamette river reached a 17 V foot
stage today. It Is expected to go to
18, but not higher. .There is little
damage reported, but . the paper
mills at Oregon City are unable to
operate.
f'l ." M.
HEAVY RAINS DAMAGE
Yakima, Wash., Jan. 24. The
Naches river at flood washed out
the" Rattlesnake bridge, ' worth $8,
000, and the waters . threaten the
Qarmack bridge, worth $30,000. The
highway at Horseshoe Ben'd Is Bald