Grants Pass daily courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 1919-1931, January 13, 1919, Image 1

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VINTON LANDS
AS PRESIDENT
OF THE SENATE
BKVMorit JOMCH WEAKER OK
T1IK IIOl'HK BOTH KLMTIONH
AUK UNANIMOUS
SESSION STARTS OFF- TODAY
Senator J. C. Hmlth, of Grants ran,
(lutlrman of Way and Mean
Committee
W II
Vi
LIES IN HER SOIL
IW. Cordljr, of O. A. 0., MakiM the
.. ftlMomrnt and Say Hull Hurvrys
Aro Now VniUv Way
Balom, Or., Jan. 13. With the
taction ot Senator Vinton, of Yam
Mil, a president of the aenata, and
Bey moti r Jonaa, of Marlon, a apeak
r of the home, the legislature
wung Into eeaalon today. Both
election were unanlmoua, and com
mittee assignment were announced.
Governor Wlthycombe will read
bit message tomorrow.
Senator J. C. Binlth. ot Grant
Pass, haa been named chairman of
tha waya and meana commit toe.
B. U Eddy, of Rosebnrg, la chair
man of tha committee on revision of
Uwa. .
E
FEDERAL LABOR BOARD
'Portland, Ore., Jan. IS. Otto R.
tlartwlg, president, and E. J. Stack,
who were renominated for their re
spective office Saturday at the dot
ing session of the annual convention
ot tha Oregon itate federal of labor.
Election will be by referendum vote
of affiliated unlom. Bend, Ore., waa
chosen aa the place tor holding next
year's meeting.
Resolutions were adopted petition
ing the legislature to enact a law
providing for an eight-hour working
day In aH Industries whero a ten'
hour day now prevails.
The action of the Pacific Coast
District Metal Trades council In de
ciding hereafter that Its affiliated
unions shall deal dtretly with their
employers, regardless of the federal
labor bonrd and the Macy agreement,
waa endorsed.
A proposition for appointment of
a delegate from the state federation
of labor to the council of workmon
and soldiers' delegates, organized
here this week, waa referred to the
executive committee for action.
Oregon Agricultural College, Cor
vallls, Jan. 13. "The wealth ot Ore
gon rents lamely lit tho soil, and
our permanent prosperity depends
upon maintaining or Improving the
fortuity of the fielda and at the same
time obtaining the maximum net
profit per acre," aaya the report of
Or. A. D. Cordloy, director ot the
Oregon agricultural experiment sta
tion.
Dotalled soil surveys are nnder
way and should be extended to cover
every agricultural section of the
state. The main made In connec
tion with the surveys serve aa a ba
sis for fertility and water Investiga
tions, and Inform the farmer of the
character of his soil and the best
means of maintaining Its fertility
while at the same time getting max
imum profits from his crops.
. More than three million acrea of
wet lands In Oregon need drainage
Much of this area consists of the
moat tortile lands In tho state, and
their reclamation would add at least
130,000,000 to the wealth of Oregon.
A careful Investigation by the exper
iment station la urgently needed to
determine the: best meana of drain
age.
.Burnt over and logged off lands In
Oregon are only a third of a million
acres abort of three million. Much
of the land la good farming land
and Investigations are needed to
Indicate the beat meana ot bring
ing them Into crop use.
ON TH
E GERMAN CAPITAL
Liebkncckfs Son and Karl Radek Arrested ArHIlery
lurned Loose When Spartacans Fire on Trace Flag
Hand Grenades Used-British Occupy Dnsseldorf
Itoftcne Vemela Stand By to Take Off
the Crrw of 4 1 IVvt Capsizes,
Two Drown
JAPANESE MAKE HKCOllll
IN BUILDING STEEL SHIP
Toklo, Jan. 13. A Jnpanese ship
building yard at Kobe hua built a
tool steamer, the Dulfuku Maru, of
9,000 tons In 23 days aftor the lay
ing ot the keel. The Japanese com
pare this with the building of a
6,000-ton stool steamer In 27 days
at the Camden, N. J shipyard.
HIT BY THE FLU
Mexico, City, Jan. 13. Ravages ot
Bpnnluh Influenza among the poor
charcoal burners who live In the
mountains surrounding the capital
are said to be responsible for the
unprecedented price which that com
modity is bringing. In the Inst
month charcoal, which la generally
used for cooking purposes, has In
creased about 800 -per cent In cost.
The municipality tins made arrange
ments to buy this product In quan
tities and retail It at reduced fig
ures. One paper In the capital states
that almost 90 per cent of the In
dians who supplied Mexico City with
the fuel were victims of the scourge.
WOULD WITHDRAW ALL
YANKS FROM RUSSIA
Washington, Jan. 13. A resolu
tlon to record In the aenate as fav
oring the withdrawal ot the Ameri
can soldier from Russia as "soon as
practicable," wa Introduced by Sen
ator Johnson of California, with the
assertion that the United Statea gov
ernment had no Russia policy and
waa Inviting disaster.
ItlOTS ARK QUELLED
IN SOUTH AMERICA
Buenos Ayres, Jan.' 13. The gov
ernment apparently has the strike
situation well In hand, although
there were severe rlota yesterday.
Buenoa Ayres, Jan. 18. The com
mnndors' ot the government troops
officially report 850 dead and 700
wounded, as a result of the strike
riots In this city.
ma ran King nuvui ouicer, uibcub-j
sing this rport, suld:
"If you double It, you will be near
er the real casualties."
Salom, Ore, Jun. 13. John D.
Southerland, catihtor In the treas
urer's offlco, recently appointed by
State Treasurer Hoff, died suddenly
while reading at his home Inst night,
at the age of 61. Mr. Southorland
has been connected with the treas
urer' office for 28 years.
TreoHuror Hoff announced that
Lester B. Davis will be Mr. South-
erland's successor.
Berlin, Jan. II. Rosa Luxem
burg, associated with Dr. Karl Ueb
knecbt In the leadership ot the Spar
tacans, ha been arrested by govern
ment soldier, it 1 reported.
Dr. Llebknecht' son was also
taken when the troop were cleaning
out the central office of Spartacans.
Karl .Radek, one of the Russian
Bolshevlkl emUsaries in Berlin, has
been arrested.
The government force captured
police headquarter after a bombard
ment. After the bombardment start
ed the government lent two men for
ward with a white flag, and demand
ed surrender. They were fired upon
and killed. The artillery then re
sumed and the Spartacans soon be
gan to flee. Several hundred were
taken prisoner. .No government
troop were killed.
The capture of the Spartacan of
fice wa effected by the free use of
hand grenades. The soldier burned
Immense quantities of Bolshevlkl lit
erature In the streets.
Copenhagen, ' Jan. 13. British
troop have occupied Dusaeldort,
which has been In the hands of the
Spartacans, It Is reported.
Berlin, Jan. 13 The SUeslan rail
way elation, the most imDortant
Spartacan stronghold In Greater
Berlin, is now In possesion of gov
ernment forces.
II
ii an rax, Nova Scotia, Jan. 13. A
wireless from the rescue vessels
standing by the United States Ship
ping board' teamer Castalla, which
baa been In distress since early Sat
urday, said that rescue of 44 of the
crew wa begun today. One life
boat containing 17 men capsized and
two men were drowned.
"THEME
AT
It waa an enthusiastic gathering
at the Chamber ot Commerce lunch
eon today noon. About 60 business
men were present. After partaking
ot the splendid meal prepared by the
ladles, F. 6. Bramwell, who last
week attended the Oregon' Chamber
of Commerce meeting and the re
construction convention at Portland,
gave a very interesting outline of
the work ot the two meeting In the
metropolis.
"The spirit ot the meeting and
the thing most talked of at pres
ent," say Mr. Bramwell, "Is Irriga
tion.-' It will probably require ten or
fifteen million dollars to cover the
various irrigation projects that have
been outlined for the west, and al
ready about 400,000 acrea are under
consideration."
At the Oregon Chamber of Com
merce meeting it waa recommended
that the auto tax ot the state be
Increased 60 per cent and one cent
per gallon added to the price ot gas-
DEATH TOLL OP 21 IN
Batavla, N. Y., Jan. 13. Twenty
one person were killed and three
were seriously injured la a rear-end
collision on the New York Central
railroad at South Byron, six miles
east of Batavla, at 3:36 o'clock, this
morning.'' Both trains were west
bound, running behind schedule.
Train No. 11, known as the South
western Limited, ran Into the rear
of train No. 17, the Wolverine, while
the latter was at a standstill prepara
tory to taking on a second engine for
the run np the steep grade between
South Byron and Batavla.
Up to a late hour tonight only a
tew of the 21 dead had been Iden
tified, the mangled condition of the
bodies and the absence ot clothing
making identification difficult . All
the fatalities were In the last car of
the Wolverine.
The rear Pullman, a steel car,
waa completely wrecked. When the
engine hit, the upper part of the sec-
ollne, which the chamber figured ond coacn trom tne end w to"
would raise about 110,000,000, the
state to Issue -bonds for that amount
tor highway construction. This res
olution, says Mr. Bramwell, was en
dorsed by the reconstruction conven
tion and the matter will be placed
before the present legislature.
At today's meeting the bill now
before the senate ot the United
States to raise one billion dollars for
reclamation work In the west was
endorsed, and It was the spirit ot tho
meeting to try and get the state to
underwrite Irrigation bonds so they
will sell at par. It Is understood that
only 75 to 90 cents on the dollar are
offered for such bonds.
Mr. Bramwell urged closer co
operation of the people of Josephine
county and said more public spirit
should be shown, Inferring that we
would, not get much In the way of
money for lateral road Improvement
unless we went out after It. An ef
fort will be made to persuade the
state highway commission to appro
priate mqney to improve some of the
lattoral roads leading to Grant Pass,
especially the one to the Illinois val
ley country,
from Its trucks and, lifting slightly,
smashed directly through the center
ot the rear coach tor Its entire
length, sweeping the berths and
seats Into a compact pile of wreck
age. Into this debris the passengers
were tightly wedged and the condi
tion or the bodies indicated that the
deaths ot most of them must have
been almost instantaneous. Not n
sleeping passenger In the car escaped
death or serious Injury. '
FLU SERUM BRANDED AS
WORTHLESS BY DR. MEYER
Portland, Jan. 13. "Serum have
not yet been Introduced which pro
duce Immunity from Spanish influ
enza. Tbys serums now employed are
of so uie whatsoever. Even the vac
cine formerly employed successfully
against pneumonia Is not giving sat
isfactory results In connection with
Influenza."
This Is the opinion of Dr. Karl F.
Meyer of the Hooper Institute of
Medical Research of the University
of California, who Is aiding Dr. Som-
mer in his battle against the Influ
enza epidemic In Portland.
"The only manner In which ac
cess can be obtained In fighting In
fluenza Is a strict quarantine and
use of masks by all people In public
gatherings, such as department
stores, theaters, ehurches, hut not In
the open air."
LUXEMBURG IS PROCLAIMED
A REPUBLIC OX FRIDAY
Mets, Jan. 13. Luxemburg was
proclaimed a republic on Friday,
when the Grand Duchess Marie re
tired from the capital taking
quarters In a chateau ,near;by,'
SOCIALISTS WANT THE
BOLSHEVIKI TO WIN OUT
4 FIRST CONFERENCE 4
4 WORK HAS BEGUN 4
' ' 4
4- Pari, Jan. , 18. The first 4
4 actual session ot the peace con- 4
-f ference has begun. It Is one of 4
4 conversation only, to lay the 4
groundwork for the big meet- 4
4 Ing. ... ...... . .... 4
4 4 4 4- 4 4-
...
V
E
" BILL OP REED'S
Washington, Jan. 13. The su
preme court today held that the
Reed "bone dry" amendment pro
hibits interstate transportation Into
dry states of Intoxicating liquor for
beverage purposes, even when In
tended for personal use.
Basel, Jan. 13. A socialist re
publio has been proclaimed at Bre
men, according to advices from Mu
nich. The Communists In Bremen
have taken the places of the major
ity socialists on the soldiers' and
workmen's council and have sent a
mossnge to the Ebert g'-vernment de
manding that they resign.
They are reported also to have
sent a telegram to the Russian Bol
shevlkl, expressing the hope that the
revolutions In Russia and Germany
would be" victorious.
s
Tucson, Ari., Jan. 13. Several
prominent Mexican and Mexican-American
residents were arrested today,
charged with smuggling arms-into
Mexico la connection with a new rev
olutionary movement, .
London, Jan. 13. to . "demobl
me aooui i.uuv-.uuo women war
workers Is the colossal task assigned
to a special department of the min
istry of labor. Women predominate
in this new organization.
One of the most difficult of their
problem will be how to satisfy a
munition worker who haa been
earning from 318 to $20 a week now
that she is called upon to return to
her former task as a family servant
at from $3 to $3.25 a week. Gov
ernment officials realize that this is
one ot the hard problems connected
with the reconstruction period es
pecially as these girls and women
must sacrifice some ot the freedom
they have enjoyed ts munition work
ers and now submit to more exact
ing hours of work. They are appeal
ing to the workers to adjust them
selves to the' new order of things as
best they can, and to be willing to
make sacrifices during the recon
struction as they did during the
war.
WOULD PUNISH HUNS
FOR THEIR SLOWNESS
London, Jan. 13. At today's ses
sion of the allied military advisers,
with General Foch presiding, a sug
gestion was made that the allies oc
cupy some of the German ports as
a guarantee of the carrying out by
Germany of the armistice conditions,
and as a punishment for the ' Ger
mans' dilatory methods in complying
with some of the armistice terms.
ASSASSIN AFTER
t . 1GNACE PADEREWSKI
- : : .
Geneva, Jan. IS. Ignace
Paderewskl was slightly wound- 4
4- ed when a would-be assassin 4
4 attacked him at Warsaw, ac- 4
4 cording to advices received 4
4 here. '4
44 44 444-'4444444
IMMEDIATELY
SAYS GREATEST EMERGENCT
FOB APPROPRIATING IOO
000,000 FOR EUROPEANS
f 000 IS KEY TO THE PROBLEM
'Bolshevism Cannot Be Stopped by
Force, Bnt Could Be With
Plenty of Food"
Washington, Jan. 13. President
Wilson has sent an urgent mi
to Senator Martin, and ReDresenta-
tive Sherley, chairmen of the ap
propriation committees, asking them
to present with all possible force
and urgency the need for the Imme
diate granting of the one hundred
million dollars for European food
relief.
The president aatd that this relief
was the key to the whole EuroDean
situation and the solution for peace.
Washington, Jan. 13. President
Wilson said In his message that Bol
shevism could not be stopped by
force, but could be by food.
PROBLEM FOR ENTENTE
' - &: - ...
. London,. Dec.. . ' 10. (Correspon
dence ot the Associated : Press.)
There Is a wide divergence of opin
ion among English politicians and.
newspapers as to the attitude which
the entente powers should assume
toward soviet iRussla.
On the one hand is the view ex-
pressed by Sir George Buchanan.
British ambassador to Russia, who
in a recent public speech urged that
reinforcements be recruited on -a-voluntary
basis and he Immediately
sent to check the Bolshevlkl. Sir
George contended that the - allies
must not desert Russia now and that "
they would be . untrue to the cause
of democracy If they did not nut an
end to the reign of Bolshevism.
At the opposite pole Is Ram?ay
McDonald and such newspapers as '.
the Manchester Guardian and Lon
don Daily News which call for the
immediate withdrawal ot all entente
forcea and demand that Great Brit
ain cease participation In military
operations which they denounce as
interference in Russian internal
politics. ,
EUGENE HARDER HIT
BY FLU EPIDEMIC
Eugene, Ore., Jan. 13. So Kreat
has been the increase In the number
of cases of Influenza In Eugene dur
ing the past week that steps are said
to have been taken to induce the
health authorities to again close all
public- meeting places which were
reopened some time a. and nos-
slbly dismiss the schools again.
GIRLS WILL STEP OUT
Salt Lake City, Utah, Jan. 13.
If pledges given to the National
League for Women's Service by the
local officers of that organization
are carried out, more than 800 wom
en, members of the Girls' Patriotic
league ot this city, will relinquish
their positions for returning mem
bers of Uncle Sam's forces. Officials,
of the league have pledges them
selves to use every Influence to per
suade other girl employes to relin
quish positions formerly belonging
to men, to returning soldiers and
Bailors... ; ;