Rogue River courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 19??-1918, July 03, 1917, DAILY EDITION, Page PAGE TWO, Image 2

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    FACT TWO
DAILY ftOGCS RIVKB OOOBUB
Tl'KHDAY, JILY 8, 1IT.
KM UK -KB XBEB
Published Dally Except Baterdej
S ) VTVNBITTM BnK nil Oixkp
mi V f III inT s n wtb
BKNJ. a 8HELD0N. Editor
1 AlW
I ItUUUl
entered t the Poetofflee, anuria Pus,
Or., m second daee nail mattar.
ADVERTISING RATES
Display apeee, par lch . ...lc
Local orpereonalcoluma, per Una 10
feeder, par Una .u . S
DAILY COURIER
By nail or carrier, par year.... 11.00
By nail or carrier, par month (0
WEEKLY COURIER
Br mall, par year-
.U-SO
. ,r:. i inCMBER .
4 State Editorial Association.
Oregon Dally Newapaper Pub. Assn.
Audit Bureau of Circulation.
TUESDAY, JVLY , 117.
' . OREGON WEATHER
Weather tomorrow: Fair,
warm. , 4
- THE PRESS HELPED
It ia gratifying to newspaper men
to note that the administration at
Washington has ptfblically Acknow
ledged that, but for the patriotic sup
port of the newspaper men, the Li
berty loan and Red Cross tampaign
would not have toeen possible.
The service rendered to (ha gov
ernment of the United States in the
ale of the Liberty loan bonds and
the Red Cross campaigns by the press
of the country is record evidence of
the generous patriotism of the news
paper men of America. It is record
ad In the pages of thousands of Am
erican newspapers, many of them
printed in foreign languages, from
the largest daily to the. smallest
country weekly. The newspapers of
the country "came across" with li
beral donations of space in news, edi
torial, and advertising columns.
As Secretary McAdoo said:
"The press of America can look
back on the work it performed for
the Liberty loan as a great public
service, ably, thoroughly and unself
ishly performed."
,Qce Hundred Pounds
IS ALL WE HAVE LEFT OF THAT
FANCY BASKET F1REI JAPAN
TEA AT Mo PER POIND WHILE
IT LASTS
ftOJPT FAIL TO UCT YOVIM.
TRY OIR Pl'RE COCOA
YOr WILL LIKE IT
KINNEY & TRUAX GROCERY
Ql'ALlTY FIRST U
SOUTHERN OREGON IRON DEPOSITS MAY
RJRN1SH ORES FOR PORTLAND STEEL MILL
The problem of securing ore for
the Oswego ateel plant near Port
land, recently acquired by Wm. Pig
got, of Seattle, may have been solv
ed through the opening of a new Iron
deposit ia Josephine county.
.. Some months ago M. Q. Waniock
and M. A. Carter of Ashland, uncov
ered and located an iron ore vein 10
mllea west of 'the Josephine county
eaves on the slopes of Buck Peak,
which assayed 60 per cent man
ganese. Last week while the rep
resentative of the new owners of the
Oswego plant, who are also the own
ers of the large hematite-magnetite
ore deposit one mile north of Gold
Hill, were ransacking southern Ore
gon for new manganese deposits they
encountered Womack who furnished-
samples of the new find, which
was forwarded to Portland for Inspec
tion. When assayed, the furnace
people were surprised ,at the rich
ness and the nature of the ore.
The result waa that a crew was
put to work exploring the vein,
which showed cropplngs for a dis
tance of three miles. . Several cross
cuts and adits displayed a vein run
ning from two to five feet In width.
The vein strikes northeast and dips
15 degrees east. The hanging walls
are shale, and the foot walls lime
and phorphry.
The vein la within a half mile of
the. new ruck road Just finished to
the chrome deposits in Oak Flat.
The nearest shipping point is Wllder-
ville a distance of 22 miles. The
partly constructed and proposed rail
road from Grants Pass t7 the const
will pass within 10 miles or the de
poalt A 20 per cent blend of thla man
ganese ore with the Gold Hill horn
attte ore makes a perfect pharo
manganese base..
Several tona of ore from the Gold
Hill deposit were shipped to Sacra
mento the nearest shipping point In
1S70 and sent to Wales for a tost.
The report on same shows thla ore
was a very high grade In Ita class.
Along during the early eighties two
Iron ore experts, Burgess A Pomeroy
acquired the property and made ex
tensive developments and shipments,
but on account of high tranaporta
tion charges they abandoned the pro
ject. Soo after that both partners
died, and their heirs disposed of the
property to the Garfield Iron A Lime
company, composed of Portland peo
ple. The property has been Idle ever
since. v i
There will be a large force of men
put to- work on the Gold Hill pro
perty after the Fourth to open up
the old works and further develop
the property. Apparently the Gold
Hill properties and the Josephine
strike will be taken over by Wm.
Plggot and hla associates and they
will "fee shipping ore from the two
mines to the Oswego plant within
SO days.
A. E. KELLOOO.
Gold Hin, Oregon.
COUNTY AGENT'S I
h NOTES I
Poisonous PUnta
Thla office la very doalroua of get
ting specimens of any plant that may
seem to be poisonous to live atock,
It will be appreciated If anyone
knowing of any suoh plants wquld
take up, root and branch, wrap In
moisture, and send It In with any
Information at hand regarding It.
Water Hemlock la one of the most
widely distributed of these planta,
'but frequently other planta of a sim
ilar nature are mistaken for It and
wo would like an opportunity to
point out the difference.
liver Flukes
Those are one of the moat serious
of animal parasites. They live In
the gall bladders and bile dticta or;
livers of sheep, goats and rattle, oc
caslonally other aolmala are affect-'
ed.
Sheep become afflicted during,
July and August. In particular, but
the effects are not shown until the
following wlnfer when the ship so
Infected, begin to get thin; aome-j
times develops a swelling under thei
Jaw and die off.
It la a good plan to keep sheep j
off pastures where there are stag-j
nant pools or slow running streams i
at this time of the year. j
C. D. THOMPSON.
County Agricultural Agent, t
TRENCH TALES
ORGANIZATION
'; Our European allies have voiced
their confidence In the organizing
ability for which the Amercan tea-!
pie have a recognized' genius, as one :
of the most important factors In de-:
terralnlng the early favorably con-'
elusion of the great war. It has been
truly aald that thla la not a war of
armies but of whole nations. This
means that nearly all the menand
women In the belligerent countrieb
can become Individual, efficient fac
tors. With a cause so high and holy,
that of defending the sacred prin
ciples of free government, of mak
ing sure that we and our posterity
shall have the right to live and build
.and enjoy the kind or Institutions
which rree people desire; of mak
ing democracy assuredly safe, and of
insuring the world against another
such cataclysm of that in which a
large share of It is now engulfed,
surely a people should be willing to
make at least small sacrifices for
auch purposes.
By organization America can do
her part. A nation organizing for
war means that everyone has his or
her little niche to fill. It means the
prompt recognition of authority.
The success with which the Li
berty loan and Red Cross efforts
were handled predicts that Ameri
cans will not fall to live up to their
high reputation for organizing ability.
A thoughtful-looking Australian
sat up In his cot when asked to tell
some of his experiences.
"To hear some people talk, you'd
think we liked fighting for flghtln's
sake. That's pure nonsense. You
can't go on fighting and not get fed
up with the beastliness of It, but you
can take It from mo that we're In
to see the complete finish. If we
could get all that we are fighting
for tomorrow I bet there Isn't a man
that wouldn't welcome peace. But
the Germans are still pretty strong,
and If we stopped now, we'd have the
same game In a few years time. I've
got kiddles and I don't want to think
that they might have to go through
all this when they are grown up.
Though I say the Germans are still
strong, they're weakening, or I'm
very much mistaken. They are prac
tically hopeless at attacking; with
out immense artillery superiority,
they can't move, and they'll never
have that auperlorlty again. Our
attacks now are better than ever
they have been and are made with the
smallest amount of losses possible."
r
Oddities In the News
An Ohio wau of iiinetv cllmKit to
top of Mount Lowe, in California.
A I'uliforula il x bus adopted four
coyote pups ns phi.vioates for Iter two
on'sprhig.
Girls of Washington are unking for
a liberty bond instead of mi piigngi"
ment ring.
Deer are doing so much damage tu
Jersey crops s me farmers regard it
cheaper to shoot them and pay $100
flue for each.
Preparedness paid a Kentucky wom
an, for while lioolnsj her garden she
dug up a pot of a"M and silver r uins
buried by a miser.
A Pennsylvania postmaster threatens
to res It ii bpiiitlso as fast ns lie gels a
woman nwlstnnt she marries and quits.
Five have thus left him In a year.
Opposition,
The effects of opposition are wonder
ful. There are men who rise refreshed
on hearing of n tliicul- inca to whom
a crisis whl;L Intimidates and pur
al;.;:Ls tlie majority, demanding not
tlie faculties of prudence and thrift,
but couipreuctn.Iou. Iimiiovulili'iiess, tw
reti iineas ut i.uciiike-1 nines graceful
and Is'loVcd as u bri.iu. -i.inei sou.
I ItcfusiMl a m-rniif to "barred zone''
In New York to see Ms sweetheart, a
I German youth pla nes her and site
' meets him ou a bench In Central park.
. You iniisr work In West Virginia,
i whether holm or millionaire, or the new
J law unlnst louring will land, you In
. lull. It ii'iili's to nil men lietween
Ixteen iinil sixty.
FOR
Chilblains
A . - wm Ml. 1
i . usnms tucaiypius winunein
AT aU DRUO BTORCe
TUBIS 9B0 JS8 BOO
You can brag aibout your garden
all winter If you have your canned
evidence on the dinner table,
FORD DODGE CHALMERS SIX
111 SUPER SIX
C. L. Hobart Company
ijo p Appreciate iron iuuer :
TH) I VE R BAN R
li Creamery Butter tj)
is Fresh
"And it's GOOD Butter'
f .- -, : 1 n t
HMBVMMaaWBBMaMHMHBaBMaaBHBBM
Made in Grants Pass
Men Wanted
IMX PAtTOKY MUX AM) I.MOr
I.AIIOItKltH WAMTKU. 'HTKAHY
WOUK. !i3 I'KU IIOI Il IT.
DORRIS LUMBER & BOX CO.
IMUtltlrt, t'AMPOIt.MA.
II
EVEN If ENGLAND STARVES"
tvniiniird From Page !.)
'"That's your American humor,"
said my guide, doubtfully. . "No
body knows all about girls; they're
not an exact science."
"They're a different sort of explo
sive."' he added, with his very fair
KngUffh humor, as the sound of girls
singing came from somewhere be
low, accompanied by giggles and a
sound of "sh-shh."
But he told about them. He ssld
they were wonderful workers. For
the most they were more tractable
and easily managed more so than the
men workers, they offered few dif
ficulties, tout these usually were or a
totally unexpected sort. That's where
they differed from cordite. One can
toll what cordite la going to do and
get ont of the way.
Their work la not heavy, except in
some Instances, where It can be com
pared with the heavy work in a stenm
laundry. Although It Is altogether
monotonous, lacking the Joy of con
struction and seeing the product
as is the rase with aeroplane or tank-
building, for example, the girls seeni-1
ed cheerful and contented.
Their wanes run from 25 to 3" !
shillings. Divide this toy four atul j
you will get a little more than tho
amount they make In dollnrs. Out j
of this they pay 13 shillings for thelrj
lodging and meals, both provided hyj
the plant. 1
We were taken through one of j
the hotels, each accommodating
from 30 to 60 girls, built In village-1
like groups. The one Inspected horcj
the name 'Edith Cavell." A mother
ly looking woman was In charge.
The Instruslon extended to the point
of peeking Into the llttlo single
rooms In the dormitories, which per
mit the girls to live somewhat tn
themselves and tack up picture post
cards of their soldier boy friends to
their heart's content. '
, Tho matron declared that between
their house parties, the handsome
clubhouse and the equally hnndsome
moving picture theater made and
provided by the government the girls
managed to enjoy life. Probably 1
they do. In any event, they are
doing the government's work and,,
hy the statement of everybody con- j
cemed, are doing It well even to
the driving of nails.
Labor Is about the most precious ,
thing In England Just now. If Sir
Edward Pearson's remark Is correct,
the reason would seem to be girls.
Rich and Poor.
The present position which we, the
educated an I well to do classes, occupy
Is that of the Old Mun or tho Hea rid
ing on the poor man's buck, only, u ti
ll lie the Old Man or tlie Ken, we aru
very sorry f ir the ixir mun, very sorry,
ami we will do utmost anything for the
KHir ttinu's relief. We will not only
supply him with fond sulllelelit to kocp
him on his lojjs, but we will teach him
and Instri!!-: Iilin and point nut to him
(lie beuutii" of the li(iiiluiis We will
discourse mm-h music to liliu mill give
him nliiniiliihco of aim I mlvlee.
Yes, we will ilo almost anything for
the sstr mini, anything but gel olf bis
buck. -ToMoy.
-
He lm guides public opinion move
Hie hand that mores the world. Hufni
Chnote.
Anything to sell? Try a classified.
THE SEA EAGLE'S GAME.
. m i
'ml mm
Csrtsr in PhiUdslphla Pri.
NOTICE
A Big Battleon' in Grants
;Pass andJJosephine
County
IMIN'T KMi VOl' It Old) I HON (Ml Ol.ll
MACHINKUY 'TIMi VOl' IIDAH KHOM MK
' f " it 1 i-i ;!
FEATHKltS OF AMj kimdh WAXTKIl
8TATK AIIOUT WHAT AMOl'NT YOU IIAVU ON
HANIt
J. j. POWERS
(1HANTH I'AHH, OHWJON.
ikix mm.
FOR (APHIS
MBLACKLEAFfl40" is cheapest and most
efficient
Demaray
Drug and
Stationery Store