Rogue River courier. (Grants Pass, Or.) 19??-1918, January 26, 1917, DAILY EDITION, Page PAGE TWO, Image 2

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OY SOGUE RIVER CQURiER
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A. B. YOORHIES. Fob. end Propr.
WTLFORD ALLBN. - . Bdttor
BUY A P1CMO HAM SOW. THKY ARB EXTRA FANCY.
at the Postoffloe, Grants
Oe M second class mail matter.
AOYBKTISINO RATES
Fcr Saturday
BRC88EL8 SPROUTS
CABBAGE
CELERY
T CRN IPS
PARSNIPS
SWKKT POTATOES
PARSLEY
CARROTS
HEAD LKTTVOK
-lie
Loeal or personal ectasia, per Uae Its
untu, le
DAILT COURIER
or carrier, par yeer..80f
9?
By
or carrier, par month . .58
WEEKLY COURIER
FLORMA GRAPE FRVTT. B ANANAS
ORANGES SOc 30c 40c
MOB TWO
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FULL UNITED PBXM L9A8KD
WIRE SERVICE
MEMBER
State Editorial Aasoetatloa
Oram Dally Newspaper Pub. Asia.
Aadtt Bureau ol Circulation
FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 1MT.
OREGON WEATHER
Tonight and Saturday partly
cloudy; southwesterly winds.
TOMORROW'S ELECTION
At eight o'clock Saturday morning
the polla will open to receive the bal
Ma of the qualified elector of the
proposed souta-eide irrigation dis
trict There are a number of ap
parently unjuet features in the law
that specifies who may vote at to
morrow's election, tot bis fact only
makes the more neceaaary the getting
out of every voter that does come
within the qualit! cation. Only land
owner whoee names appear upon the
assessment rolls can rote. -
While the frienda of irrigation and
of the project are confident that there
will be enough votes in favor of the
project to .carry It through, it is
known that there ie some opposition,
especially where other possible pro
jects may be refered with through
district formation. This is, of course,
a selfish opposition, and no legitimate
argument against the formation ot
the district has yet been advanced.
If the present attempt to bring
water to the south side lands should
fail, it will no doubt mean defeat for
irrigation there for many years to
come. -Lack of irrigation will mean
that there can be no agricultural de
velopment, land values can not in
crease, for ownership of the lands
without water can not be profitable.
Tomorrow's election! one of great
est moment to the Grants Pass dis
trict. If tt succeeds, and the district
formation proceeds, K will open up a
great acreage of excellent land I and
will Change conditions in a most rad
ical manner. It will make unneces
sary the shipping In of hundreds of
carloads of hay, for hay can be grown
in rotation with sugar beets. Farmers
who hare been striving with inade
quate irrigation, or with no irrigation
at all, will have cheaper water end
all he water needed. Water sup
plied by grartty such as' under the
proposed district is the economical
and aura way.
PROPOSED ROGUE FISH BILL
The bill arranged (by the fish com
mittee of the house to take the place
of .the bills Introduced by various
members regulating commercial fish
' tog in Rogue river was Introduced
thoredey. Tbe substance ot the bill
prohibits the nse of the seine and
the set net In the river, but does not
change . in any way the seasons and
condition otherwise. The bill is as
follows:
"A bill for an act relating to fish
ing In Rogue river; prohibiting tbe
use of seines In the waters ot Rogue
river and its tributaries; prohibiting
the use of set nets In the waters of
Rogue river sad its tributaries; re
pealing all acts In conflict herewith,
and fixing penalities tor violations of
this act.
'Be It enacted by the people of the
state of Oregon:
"Section 1. It shall lbs unlawful for
any, person, firm or corporation to
fish for or take or attempt to take
any salmon or other fish from any
of the. waiters of Rogue river or its
tributaries, with or by means of a
seine or set-net of sny kind or de
scription. . .
"Section 2. That from and alter
KINNEY & TRUAX GROCERY
QUALITY FIRST
the taking effect of this act. it shall
be unlawful for any person, firm or
corporation, to neb. for or take from
the waters of Rogue river or its trib
utaries, except with hook and line,
any salmon or other species of fish
below or west of a line extending due
south from the highest point of
Doyle's Rock, near the -mouth of
Rogue river. Curry county. Oregon
This prohibition shall ba deemed to
also apply to the waters of the Pa
ciflo ocean within a radius of three
miles from the mouth of said Rogue
river, over which the state of Oregon
has Jurisdiction.
"Section 3. Any violation ot any
of the provisions of this act shall be
fifty dollars and not more than two
hundred and fifty dollars, or by im
prisonment in the county jail for a
period not lees than thirty days nor
more than six months, or by both
such fine and Imprisonment, In the
discretion of the court. All fines col
lected under this act shall (be die
posed of as now provided by the laws
of the state of Oregon for violations
ot the fishing laws.
"Section 4. Justices of the peace
shall have concurrent jurisdiction
with the circuit court of any viola
tions of this act.
'Sections 8. All acts and parts of
acta M this state in conflict with the
provisions of this act are hereby re
pealed."' Washington, Jan. 28. Renewed
efforts for Americanization of Immi
grant laborers and a more perfect
assimilation of immigrant population
was Urged today by Walter C. Piper,
of the National Association of Real
Estate boards, Detroit, (before the Na
tional Security league here today.
Piper advanced Detroit as the
"leader In the Americanization move
ment" and as "the most American
of American cities."
Detroit business men and manu
facturers, be said, have joined In a
determined campaign to Americanize
Detroit's 60,000 non-English speaking
aliens.
As a result of this campaign, he
said, 100 per cent more applications
for naturalization papers were filed
in Detroit In 1919 than the previous
year.
"The immigrant," Piper said, "Is
a powerful industrial, social and pol
itical factor a vital link in our in
dustrial progress. Their assimila
tion Is not welfare work, but funda
mental civic necessity."
The Detroit Board of Education,
Piper said, sympathizing with the
movement, has opened 30 public
night school In the foreign quarters,
where foreigners may learn English.
Detroit's employers, under the direc
tion of the Detroit Board of Com
merce, In furtherance of the move
ment, have Issued recommendation to
their non-English speaking employes
to attend these schools. Those at
tending them will be favored In pro
motion. Window Lssves.
Bis species of plants that posses
window leaves hav been discovered In
South Africa. They are sll stemless
succulents, and the egg shaped leaves
are Imbedded In tbo ground, only tbe
apices remaining visible. Tb visible
part of tbe leaves Is flat or convex on
the surface and colorless, so that tbe
light can penetrate It and reach the in
terior of tbs leaf below, which Is green
on tbs inside. With the exception of
th blunt spex no psrt of tb lesf is
permeabi to tbs light, being surround
4 by the sol) In which It Is buried.
IS
MOVED FROM CELL
New York, Jan. 26. Mrs. Ethel
Byrne, militant birth-control advo
cate, who haa now been on a hunger
strike for fire days, was removed
from her cell to the hospital on
Black-well's Island today. This was
disclosed In an official bulletin re
garding her condition Issued by Bur
den C. Lewis, commissioner of cor
rection. In which It was stated that
Mrs. Byrne was notlceaMy weaker:
Authorities are receiving constant
reports on Mrs. Byrne's condition
through Dr. Irma Howard, a prisoner
physician. They declared that If Dr.
Howard feels at any time that Mrs.
Byrne should be fed, food will be
given her. They did not designate
the method.
The -bulletin today stated that Mrs.
Byrne's blood pressure was wavering.
her pulse moderately weaker, "tem
perature slightly below normal, res
plratlon within normal limits."
Mrs. Byrne- slept four bours last
night and walked about a bit. Her
condition was declared "slightly
weaker."
BIG PEACE MOVE
London, Jan. 26. That Emperor
William plans to make his fifty
eighth birthday tomorrow the oc
casion for another peace move
with more acceptable terms to the
entente allies was reported today
from several different sources.
The nearest thing to an official
hint of this plan was' read in the
speech made yesterday to the Hun
garian parliament by Count Stephen
Tlsza, the Hungarian premier.
"We are Inclined to continue a
further exchange of views regarding
peace with the United States gov
ernment," was the' way the Hungar
ian statesman put it.
More than usual significance was
attached today to this Intimation, in
view of the fact that Count Tlsza Is
supposed to have 'been one of the pre
miers of the central powers who re
cently held conferences at Berlin.
Tbe second rumor came via Switz
erland and Paris. It purported to
be Ibased on private information from
Germany, and stated that the Ger
man emperor planned to be the
"first promoter of universal peace
and would propose that all parties
meet forthwith to discus thl first
and principal article of the war' ter
mination the reorganization of fu
ture peace."
Report from Holland indicate
that some sort of a reply to Presi
dent Wilson's lenate speech Is be
ing considered by officials In Berlin.
Since the American president's peace
suggestions and bl plan for secur
ing peace at the end of the war were
not broached In a formal note, It I
conceded that It Germany I to ex
press her approbation of any or ell
of the sentiments he expressed, such
approval must be made In a speech
or statement.
A pronouncement of the emperor
would be a logical mode of answer.
The German government also ex
pects President Wilson formally to
transmit to Berlin the text ot the re
ply made iby the entente power, to
his own peace suggestion. Officially
Germany Is not yet Informed of what
the allies said In reply to the Ameri
can president. Teutonic official
suppose they will be so Informed
Opals ar mingling of silica, flint
sad water, and their Iridescent Or Is
ld lo lie due lu lb presence of tb
wsier,
AS SURE as the baby
( falls out of bed, the cat
gets in the cupboard, boy
walks in his sleep, mother
drops her thimble, the gar
age has to be locked as
sure as it will grow dark
tonight you will need ah
EVEREADY.
If you have a flaahUht that Isnt working., bring
it in and have it fitted with a genome Evereedy
Tongsten Battery. We carry Eveready Maid
lamps for flashlights, too.
Bush Electric Store
Bay Electric Goods at the Electric Store
KKNl'MK DISCUSSION
OK WILSON SPEECH MONDAY
Washington, Jan. 26. Discussion
ot the president' address to the sen
ate last Monday, will 'be resumed In
the upper body next Monday. After
democratic leaders today" turned
down a proposition by Borah, that
"vote without debate be taken on his
resolution, Borah announced he
would bring tt up Monday.
The Borah resolution calls for
"support ot the Monroe doctrine
principles and avoidance of entang
ling alliances." i .
TAKES FOOLISH DARK,
IB INSTANTLY KILLED
Windsor, Ont., Jan. 28. St. Clair
WalkerT 28, honorably discharged
after doing his bit for England In
Prance, was Instantly killed today In
a Windsor garage, where he was em
ployed, because he accepted a dare.
Employes were gathered about an
felectric motor In the garage.
"Bet you're afraid to touch the
two charging point and form a con
nection," said one;
Walker wasn't.
EXPIXMHNU OAS HEATER '
LANDS MAN ON SIDEWALK
Salem, Jan. 26. Sam Summers,
manager of a restaurant, was eating
at his own lunch counter today. He
thrust his fork Into a morsel of food.
Then he found himself sitting upon
the sidewalk, In the midst of assorted
debris. A gas beater had exploded.
The cafe was wrecked, Summers
suffered bruises.
NO MORE PAINT FOR
WASHINGTON GIRL STUDENTS
'Washington, Jan. 26. War paint,
affeoted by girls at exclusive Wash
ington finishing schools, today was
abolished by order of the principals.
Rouge, beauty sopts, eyebroy. pen
cils and Up sticks were formally ex
pelled. With them goo the deco
lette gown, that heretofore has per
mitted a full, unrestricted survey of
sbiinmering arms, shoulders and ver
tebrae. WILSON CLIMBING AHOAHD
SUFFRAGE BAND WAGON
Washington, Jan. 28. Expressing
a very real interest", in me xien-
slon of suffrage to women, President
Wilson today wrdte a letter to Mrs.
Carrie Chapman Catt, president or gregum or 1 2,000,ono tons in trans
the National Woman' Suffrage asso- port service Wone. s Oermany hits
elation, congratulating that orgnnlza-, 39,1 per cent of her tonnage In neu
tlon on It work In securing passing trsl port.
by the North Dakota legislature of, All of thl will be released after
suffrage legislation, I ths war to compete with the then ex-
A claimed sd will give result,
(ft
aft
With that Ion j lived TUNGSTEN
10
Pittsburg, Jan. 26. A direct warn-.
ng to-the, newly created shipping
board to go slowly In working out
plan for extension of the American
merchant marine under government
patronage, was given iby the Foreign
Trade council today. The report
said:
"The duty which lies before the
shipping board Is not so much the
expenditure of the appropriation
(150,000,000 granted tho board to
use at Its discretion) under the dan
gerous conditions existing at present,
but the evolution of a policy enabling
American ships to compete on equal
terms with thoio that have In the past
carried the preponderating share of
our foreign commerce."
It was prepared by a committee
comprising J. A. Farrell, Rdtert Dol
lar and P. A. S. Franklin, and was
presented today by Secretary Fat
chln. Other speakers, Including Dollar,
took up various phases ot the ship
ping question. All papers presented
had bearing upon it and the discus
sion was entirely devoted to It.
Attacking the personnel of the(
new shipping board, Dollar said :
"I know them all; they aTe men of,
the highest type. When I want a
suit ot clothes, I do not go to a shoe-
maker. There Is a lawyer, a lumber-
man, a railroad man, and two hlp-. Washington, Jan. 26. On conten
ping men. In England they seleot . tloni of Senators Works, Kenyoa and
for the shipping board men who are , p0ndexter, that "any attempt to gala
most active In shipping. control of the education ot the com-
'What we want Is more contruc lng generation of America is most
tlon and less destruction In our gov-j dangerous," the senate today struck
eminent policy." , ' j from the payroll ot the federal
H. H. Hayes, of Galveston, spoke i bureau of education, the names of
along similar lines. Louis Gets of persons also employed toy the Cerne
San Francisco, spoke In favor ot sub- ( Ra in(j Rockefeller foundations,
sldlzlng the lAmeiican merchant mar-j Senator Chamberlain declared a
Ine. j number of person! connected wttk
The Providence," R. I., Chamber of . the Rockefeller general education
Commerce, presented a set of reso
lutions, "urging the federal depart
ment of commerce to encourage a
more equitable distribution of port
calls."
The marine, committee's report,
presented by Socretary Patchln, show-
ed by a mass of figures that despite
the great losses of allied tonnage
mrougn enemy siwiimriiiiiiKi, mi"-
lng and capture, England ana iter
nil Ion still possess shipping of an ag-
Istlng American 'Hnsnmant marine on
an advantageous foaUj It was stated
CtWW its' -
IIP" :
Battery
as there is a marked illnVr uu be
tween rates of pay for labor oa
wharves anil ship board In American
employ and in foreign employ, great
ly In favor of the foreign Interests,
Though only 60 per rent, approxi
mately, of the world's total tonnage
Is now available for carrying the
peaceful commerce of the world, the
report vbutlnued, and there is a da
mahd for more vessels than ran pos
sibly be supplied, this condition will
be shown to have resulted largely la
unwarranted optimism relative to th
future of American shipping, unless
the ground Is thoroughly studied as
the policy adopted Is " a most vis
ionary" one.
Portland, Jun. 26. Today's mar
ket quotation were:
Wheat Club, 160; liliieetem. 163.
OaU No. 1 white reed, 3D 00.
Barley Feed. 39.00.
Hogs Best live, 11.10,
' Prime steers, H.ftO; fancy ,
7.60; best calves, 8. HO.
Spring lamb, 12.
Butter City creamery 42; coun
try. 32.
Egg Selected local extras, 33 fl
S3.
Hens, 16 18; broiler, 18 9
20; geese, 12 18.
SENATOR WORKS HITS AT
THE IIURRAU OF EDUCATION
, boa i d -a a part of the foundation
i and the Carnegie foundation are
, drawing nominal salaries of 81 a
drawing nominal salaries of
year from the bureau of education,
Their connection with a government
bureau, he said, enables them to send
0t nndnr government frank and
lanctlnn their view on vsrlous sub-
je,, Recently congress passed wlm-
nur mmsisiion arrowing tna depart-
mcnt icf agriculture.
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