Washington County news. (Forest Grove, Washington County, Or.) 1903-1911, September 29, 1904, Page 6, Image 6

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    I
WASHINGTON COUNTY NEWS
EARL B. HAWKS. Editor.
Published Every Thursday by the Washing­
ton County Publishing Co. Incorporated
at Forest Grove, Oregon
WILL FRENCH, Business Manager.
EARL B. HAWKS, Associate Manager.
CIRCULATION 1500.
Rates on Job Work and Adver­
tising Furnished on Enquiry.
$1.00 a Year in Advance.
Office on Pacific Avenue.
Both Phones.
Entered at the post-office at Forest
Grove, Oregon, as second class
mail matter.
Address all communications to Wash­
ington County Pub. Co.,
Forest Grove, Ore.
If the NEWS fails to reach its subscrib­
What will Oregon mills do for wheat
with over ten million bushels of wheat
already sold to Eastern firms? Now
they are buying more. On this coast at
the present time are T. W. Swift,
buyer for McLean, Swift & Co.,
of Battle Creek; J. J. Keller,
buyer for the American Cereal Com­
pany, Chicago; R. M. Adams, for the
East St. Louis Elevator Company;
H. A. Wernli for Van Dusen, Harring­
ton & Co. of Minneapolis. H. Higg­
ins for the Armour Grain Company of
Chicago; W. S. Rosenbaum, of Chicago,
and H. W. Goodnow, of St. Louis.
With ten millions of bushels already
sold and the prospect thatjthese buyers
will get another ten million bushels,
Oregon millers will have to pay more
for wheat and the consumer may look
for a sharp advance in flours in the
near future.
The Issue in a Syllogistic Nutshell
“ In one crisp sentense of eight
words of his letter of acceptance, Presi­
dent Roosevelt has given the first
THURSDAY, SEPT. 29, ’04 premise
for a conclusive syllogism:
First Premise— ‘A party fit to govern
Our new laundry plant is now an must
have convictions.’
established fact and we hope that it Second
Democratic
will suggest other needed enterprises party, from Premise—The
Parker down to Tom
so that a train of benefits will follow. Taggart, has Judge
no convictions.
If home capital would back home
enterprise both capital and the city Conclusion—Therefore the Demo­
cratic party is not fit to govern.
would be richly benefitted.
And there you have the process of
reasoning
that will decide this
“ At one stroke of his pen Abraham Lin
coin freed 4,000 000 black men.- election.”
With one stroke of his pen Koosevelt
has made it possible to reclaim more The movement for the addition of
than 100 , 000,000 acres of land to the 9 th and 10th grades to our city
agriculture, adding millions of Ameri­ school is a movement in the right
can farm homes with their vast volume direction and should appeal to every
of agricultural products which will flow fair minded citizen of Forest Grove.
from this rich area of land redeemed The only fault the News has to find
with the movement is that it feels that
from the desert.”
it should also include the 11 th and
“ Like the Indian, who, when unable 12 th grades and all should be based
to find his camp and it was suggested on a high standard. Some may think
he was lost, replied: ‘Me no lost, that it would injure the Academy but
wigwam lost,’ so the Democratic party if they will investigate they will find
insists, notwithstanding its constant that it would rather help than injure it.
change of front, that the country, not But regardless of that the citizens who
the party, is lost. The Democratic are unable to stand the tuition of the
party, without a fixed policy, would be Academy and who are paying taxes
as safe a guide as the Indian in a should be entitled to at least ordinary
school privileges.
strange wilderness.”
ers or is late, we request that immedi
ate attention may be called to the same.
The whole political situation has
now, since Parker’s letter of acceptance
has appeared, resolved itself into the
question which a voter wishes—a party
of progression and statesmanship head­
ed by an energetic, fearless beleiver in
the rights of the people, or a party
whose policy is to let opportunities
pass because its leaders fail to clearly
discern the future effect of present
events and policies. The result is not
even doubtful—the majority of men
will always join the ranks of a party
which espouses good principles and
policies at the beginning rather than
the ranks of a party which opposes
every good thing until it has become
“ irrevocably settled.”
portunity. H. G. Fitch will register
voters untill October 20, office, corner
of A. Bunnings livery stable.
Bailey’s cider mill is working full
blast, and teams coming from all dir­
ections with apples to have the juice
extracted.
We took a fresh hold on life when
we read last week of the prospect
of an electric road from the south.
We trust there will be no chance of
our suffering a reaction.
Probate Court
Estate of Jacob Clearwater, deceased.
Will admitted to probate and Nancy S.
Clearwater appointed executrix with
bonds fixed at $500. Geo. H. Wil­
cox, Geo. A. Morgan and J. A. Imbre
appointed appraisers.
Estate of A. O. Brown, deceased.
Monday, Nov. 7, 1904, set for hearing
final account and objections hereto.
Estate of Daniel Patton, deceased.
Final account approved. Administra­
tor discharged and estate closed of
record.
Guardianship of Elizabeth Schmidt,
deceased. Guardian authorized to sell
real estate at public sale for cash.
Estate of John Berger, deceased.
Inventory and appraisement showing
property of the value of $3845'25 ap­
proved.
One Dave Bennett was examined for
insanity before County Judge Rood on
Sept. 23, Dr. F. A. Bailey being the
examining physician and was adjudged
not to be insane.
F M Heidel to Elizabeth Ben­
son 50x198 ft Main St H’ll’o 450
Franz A Reitzel et ux to John
C Smith 36 acres in t 1 n r
3 " • • • • • ............................... 2752
Franz A Reitzel et ux to John C
Smith 10 acres in sec 7 t 1
n r 3 w .................................. 2752
Hiram M Hamilton et ux to C
E Craven n w i of s w i of
sec 12 t 2 n r 6 w ................. 5 q
F M Heidel et al to W T Bailey
50 acres in sec 33 t 1 s r 4
w .............................................. 700
Effie M O’Connor et al to W H
Miss Fowler, one of the employees
of the P. C. C. Milk Co. is very sick
at her home with malarial fever. Dr.
Ward is the attending physician and
reports the patient somewhat better
today.
Quality talks. Corvallis flour makes
such good bread that Thomas & James
now have to buy Corvallis flour in car
load lots. They will have a car load
in today. This is made from old
wheat, try a sack and your wife will
use no other.
Girls Wanted
Two girls wanted for housework.
Enquire at News Office.
R ent a Cent a Month.
Anthony Suda of St. Louis lives
in a house for which he pays a rental
of a cent a month. This rental 1 ;
charged by his employers, and Su-
da’s task is that of actriig as watch­
man at the factory almost adjoin 11 .’
his home. His employers stale that
they charge Suda a cent a mom!»
rent for the house in order that he
Marriage Licenses
would be entitled to thirty days’
County Clerk E. J. Goodman issued notice before eviction in the event
a marriage license to J. London and of the property passing into other
Ester Hutchinson; Edward F. Krah- hands.
B ricks M ads of Sand and Lima.
mer and Louise Henrietta Eisenhardt
Bricks
are now being made of
during the past week.
clean sand and ground quicklime
that are said to be as substantial as
Real Estate
granite. They cost $2.50 per 1,000.
The mixed ingredients are forced
Annie Frizelle et al to Phillips
into a strong steel cylinder mold by
Shea et ux swi of sei sec 8 t
2 s l 2 w 40 acres.................$
1 means of a screw. After the air has
been sucked from the cylinder, hot
A W Atteabury et ux to John
water is admitted, the rock being
Owens è a in sec 32 t 2 s r 1
formed by the resulting pressure
and
heat.— Country Life In Amer­
w..............................................
25
ica.
C I and M Y Brown to John B
Fields 5 a near T F Taylor d
An Explorer.
l c ............................................ 800 Definitions are everything, as a
Cornelius
prisoner brought up before a French
School commenced Monday Sept. James B Huston to Charles E
magistrate the other day made clear
Craven
162.70
a
in
sec
12
26th with S.C. Scherill, Principal; Miss
again. He was arrested for having
Lillian McVickers, Intermediate; Miss t 2 n r 6 w and lots 1, 2 and
caught with his hands in an­
3 in sec 7 2 n 5 w................. 500 been
Louise Mooberry, Primary.
other
man’s pockets. “Your pro­
Lee
R
Huston
et
ux
to
J
Milton
fession
?” asked the judge. “An ex­
Mr. L. Weidowitch is building a Craven et al lots 6, 9 and 10
plorer,”
was the reply of the accus­
new store building, the old one having in sec 1 and lot 7 in sec 2 t
who perhaps remembered Sainte-
been moved to the rear. L. S. Foster 2 n r 6 w 150 91 acres.... 500 ed,
Beuve’s dictum that an example is
will occupy the new building with a Albert Verboort to T R Davis
always the best definition.
good stock of General Merchandise.
254.21 a in T R Cornelius
An A ll Negro Bank.
Dr. E. Everest is preparing to put
....................................... 13312 An evidence of what the negro,
in a new stock of drugs into his store H d B 1 c Johnson
known in the territory as a freed-
Nancy Mc-
building and will soon be ready to Loud 369 a in A to Hinman
man,
is doing to better his condition
d
1
c
66
is
shown
in the incorporation of the
supply the people of the surrounding Jessie C Snyder et al to Charles
Creek Citizens’ Realty Bank and
country with remedies for all the ills Adams 77.25 acres in sec 22
Trust
company, which was formed
that flesh is heir to.
t
2
n
r
3
w
and
5.85
acres..
1 at Muskogee with a capital stock 0
The electors who failed to register G Koeber 8 acres in sec 14
$50,000. All the officers and stock­
last spring will now have another op­
are negroes.— Kansas City
1 2 s r 2 w............................. 105 holders
Journal.
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