Eastern Clackamas news. (Estacada, Or.) 1916-1928, December 04, 1924, Page 3, Image 3

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    EASTERN CLACKAMAS NEWS, THURSDAY, EECEMBER 4 . 1 9 2 4
KINDERGARTEN IN PUBLIC
SCHOOLS IN O R E G O N
he is given the stories of each,
Notice of School M eeting
including Halloween, Thanksgiv­
Notice is hereby given to the legal voters of School District No. 10S of
ing and Christmas, following Clackamas County. State of Oregon, that a School Meeting of said district
through the spring until Faster will he held at H. S. Building, on the SOth day of December, 1924, at 7 :30 o'clock
in the afternoon for the purpose of discussing the budget hereinafter set out
season. He studies the birds in with the levying board, and to vote on the proposition of levying a special
season, the trees which include district tax.
The total amount of money needed by the said school district during
the logging industry; the flowers the fiscal year beginning on June 30, 1924, and ending June 30, 1925, is
and animals.
He studies the estimated in the following budget and includes the amounts to be received
from the county school fund, state school fund, elementary school fund,
duties of the postman, the butch­ special
district tax, and all other moneys of the district:
er, the baker and in fact a great
BUDGET
m a n y vocational occupations
E S T IM A T E D E X P K N D 1 T C U E S
through stories and often visits P erson al Services
S a la ry per y e a r
T otal
to the various places. And most 2. P rin cip a ls. 1 ..............................................................................................t 2.200.00
| 2,200.00
1,800.00
of all he is allowed to develop his 3. T each e rs. 1 ................................................................................................ 1,800.00
1
............................................................................... 1.350.00
own idea9, he learns to think for
2
.............................................................................................. 1,303,00
2.610.00
2....................................................................................................
1.260.00
2,520.00
himself and to carry out his plans.
6, .............................................................................................................
990 00
5.940.00
Through the acquringof habits 4. Ja n ito r s , t .................................................................................................. 1,700.00
1.TM.M
C lerk. 1 .........................................................................................................
150.00
150.00
of obedience, order, self control 5.
7. O ther serv ices ..........................................................................................
350.00
350.00
and Industry from the kindergar­
T o tal
$18,620.00
ten training, a bridge is made
llflil Su pplies;
which makes his entrance into 1 M 1. aterial
F u rn itu re (desks, stove;*. c u rta in s, e t c . ) ............... .....................
$ lftO.ftft
the primary grades, where the 2. Supplies (ch alk , era sers, etc.) M anual T ra in in g & Scien ce
1 , 000.00
L ib ra ry hooks ...........................................................................................
150.0ft
real mind training begins, a m ich 3.
4 . V lftfi
...........................................................................................
10.0ft
more happy event thin when he | f>. Playground equipment .........................................................
25.00
n ito r 's supplies ...................................................................................
150.00
has to take the l>ng step fr>m C. 7 Ja
Fu rI ...............................................................................................................
650.0ft
Mother’s arm 5 t> the prima-y
950.00
L i gilt < 111 m i • m i • • 11111111 1111 • 1111 ■ 1111 n 11 l i t n u t • ti
9. Water . , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , l l l l l l l i m i l »»»*»» , , , , , , , , .........
100.00
grades without this assistance.
lft. P ostag e and s ta tio n e r y ........................................................................
35.00
The kindergarten a3 a part of
9 2,570.04)
the public school system is prac­ (D im tr actio n !
C onstruction ................................................ .......................
tically in its infauey in Oregon,
$ 150.09
which was the last state in the
T o ta l ...................................................................................
$ 150.00
union to pass a kindergarten law. M aintenance an«l R epair«)
Building:* and gro u n d s........................................................................
9 1.500.00
This was brought about by
women of Portland who for the
T o ta l ...................................................................................
9 1,500.00
past twenty years have interested A ssessm ent* (H lgliw uys, R oads, S tre e ts, B rid g e s):
A ssessm ents (H ig h w ays, Hoads, S tre e ts, B r i d g e s ) :.........
9
50.00
themselves in tne establishing of
9
50.00
free.kindergartens. The bill as it
Ind ebtedn ess:
*
now BtandB permits the school 1. Bonded, and in terest th e re o n .........................................................
I 3 1 0 0 .0 0
boards of any district to establish
T o ta l ...................................................................................
I 3 1 0 0 .0 0
a kindergarten upon the petition in su ran ce
of twentv-five parents of child*
9 200.00
ren residing in the district.
As
T o ta l ...................................................................................
9 200.00
a result of this bill there are M iscellaneous:
9
700.00
five public school kindergarten’s
in Oregon; four in Portland and
? 700.00
T o ta l ...................................................................................
Km ergenrys
one in Powers, Oregon.
E m erg en cy ................................................................................................
9 500.00
Oregon now ranks 35th in the
T o ta l ...................................................................................
9 500.00
establishment of kindergartens;
T o ta l estim ated am ount o f m oney fo r all
California with 600 ranks first
purposes during the y e a r ...................................
927,390.0 m
and Washington has over iOj ts
E S T IM A T E D K E C E I P T S
tablished public school kinder­ From county school fund during th e com ing school y e a r . . . . ? 2,406.00
From sta te school fund during th e com ing school y e a r ...........
142.12
garten.
From elem en tary school fund during th e com ing school year 1,792.36
The fact that the women of
the Parent - Teac her Association
of the state of Oregon, assisted
by the State Federation of Worn
en’s clubs are directing their
best efforts toward a moriificatio
of the present kinderparten hit'
at the next session of the le^isla
ture, has stimulated the interest
in this department of our public
school system and the question
arises, “ What is a kinderparten
anyway and why do they want
them in the public schools ? ”
The very bepinninp of the kin
dergarten work in the world,
according to most authorities
dates back to 1782 when a system
of education for the very young,
defining an educational policy
especially applicable to the ages
from four to six and having as
its chief merit the fact that edu­
cation was made a real drawing
out, a means toward the unfold
i n ' o f the child’s whole nature
with a view to free development
an 1 action was devised by Fred
erick Frobel. From this founda­
tion has sprung the present kin­
dergarten system now widely
used in the p lblic schools of the
U n i t e d S t a t e s a nd Gr e a t
Britain.
A tfi‘ j»t tinny peop'a have the
idea that a kindergarten Is a sort
of day nursery where children
whose Darents have to work,
m y be sent to be entertained
for a few hourB in the day.
Where they learn to color and
cut p etty things from colored
pap r, sing little songs and play
nice little gemes, which of course
is all very tiue. but they have
never been informed as to the
real constructive program which
is outlined and followed day by
day in a systematic way just as
other departments of education.
CHEVROLET ESTABLISHES
There is a curriculum for the
MANY ASSEMBLY PLANTS
kinderg irten which is composed
of a variety of subjects and act­
A plan begun by the Chevrolet
ivities selected because of their
Motor company in 1922 to cut
value in meeting the needs of the down freight costs of shipments by
children from four to six years. paralling each of their assembly
It includes the study of nature, plants with a factory for the Fish-
human beings and human activi c r Body Corporation, w h i c h
tics or home and community life builds all Chevrolet closed bodies,will
be completed by the first of theyear
an i some of the products of
when the final factory for the Fish­
human intelligence as literature, er Body Corporation will be in oper­
music, and art.
It furnishes ation at the Tarrytown, N. Y. as­
through oral expression, manual sembly plant.
A factory for the Fisher Body
work, drawing, singing, dramatic
play, games etc., an avenue thr­ Corporation to build Chevrolet bod­
ough which experience isdelined ies is now in operation at six of the
seven Chevrolet assembly plants
interpreted a n d o r g a n i z e d . The or.c at Tarrytown, N. Y. is the
Through each of these forms of last to be completed.
activity it satisfies some one or
There has been a close connection
more of the fumendamental im- between the establishment of Chev­
pilses of the child and if rightly rolet assembly plants and the grad­
ual reduction in price of the Chev­
used in the school contributes its rolet car in the last five years,par­
peculiar share toward his develop ticularly since the Fisher
Body
ment and education.
Corporation factories have been es­
Since it is conceded bv noted tablished at each Chevrolet assem­
bly plant.
educators that the child instincts
Chevrolet assembly plants were
are dominant at the age of four, first established at Flint, Mich., St.
which is the age at which the Louis, Mo., Tarrytown, N. Y. and
child may enter the kindergarten Oakland, Cal. from 1917 on. In
to this department then is en­ 1923 assembly plants were estab­
trusted the great responsibility lished by Chevrolet at Janesville
Wis., Cincinnati, 0 . and Buffalo,
of so balancing self expression N. Y. and plants for the Fisher
self repression as to develop a Body Corporation were built at
personality in the child that is at these points at." the same time. The
the same time self sufficient and year previous, however, Fisher body
building plants had been established
yet helpful and cooperative.
at the Chevrolet assembly plants at
The underlying principal in the Flint, Mich., St. Louis,Mo. and
regular kindergarten work is Oakland, Cal.
true democracy, developing thr­
During this period has come
ough character building, good about a number of reductions in
citizenship.
The kindergarten | the price of Chevrolet cars, due in
great measure to the economies ef
child is taught willing service, fccted by such assembly plants,
usefulness, appreciation, inde which includes also the building
pendence, perseverance, desire, factories. From early in 1920
and aspiration through the tell­ through 1924, a period of five years,
ing of suitable stories, the sing­ there have been reductions In the
ing of songs, the placing of price of the Chevrolet cars, totaling
approximately 35 per cent.
games, and the working out of
In addition to the economies ef-
problems and projects with these ffccted and the consequent price re­
duction, there has also been a
facts brought to his attention.
The work of the kindergarten j steady marked improvement in the
child must, of course, e b ery quality of the Chevrolet cars.
New features have been incorpora­
simple at first, at least until he ted from time to time which added
learns that certain things must to the comfort and convenience of
be done at certain times, a fact the owner.
The new factory for the Fisher
which is entirely foreign to him
perhaps unless it is that bedtime Body Corporation at Tarrytown, N.
Y. has already been completed,
and mealtime come at regular equipment will shortly be installed,
intervals, and far too often it is and it should he in operation at the
found that the modern home has beginning of the year.—From the
not imparted even this, and he Chevrolet Motor Company.
has been living a haphazard life
See Mrs. J. E. Gates for piano
along with the rest of his fam­
inatruction.
Price* reasonable.
ily.
i
L
0
.
0
.
K.
building.
tf
As the holiday season advances
E s tim a te o f probable unexpended b alan ce a t end o f cu rren t
y e ar ..........................................................................................................
E stim ated am ount to be received from all o th er sources
du rin g th e com ing school y e a r ..................................................
In fo rn a re :
2«n).oo
200.00
»
»
408.00
»
700.00
»
»
50.00
203.03
»
700.00
»
253.03
9
T otftl ...........
M iscellaneou s!
T o ta l
Em ergen cy •
»
$
«
i
»
100.00
100.00
»
9
150.00
150.00
»
150.00
6
115.00
61.00
190.00
369.00
»
225.98
»
225.DS $
734.06
9 1,228.69
921.042.ss
»:
926.199.43
395.00
t
Totnl
(tram i Totnl
500.00
500.00
....»
.........------ »27 .390.00
»2 3,683.76
» 500.00
«26 .299.00
»20.36I.TS
924.264.00
I. Wm. Dale, do hereby certify that the above estimate of expenditures for
the year 1924-1925 was prepared by me and that the expenditures and budget
allowance for six months of the current year and the expenditures for the
three fiscal years next preceding the current year as shown above have been
compiled frum the records in my charge and are true and correct thereof.
_______________________________ WM. DALE, District Clerk.
Where U. S. Farm Products Go
*0>W*U rjff*n*ATRgssuen «4 u «* iaa J
( )\ /]
ess s * * «
^ o
R a
000 lu
.
'7T -,
r 7 * f) Ik
|
Products of the American farm go to every civilized country of the world.
Out of the United States each year la sent approximately one-lmlf of the total
cotton crop, one-fourth of the yield of the wheat fields, one-fifth of the porkers
and huge quantities of corn and tobacco, dried fruits and other products of
field and feed lot.
|
The accompanying chart, prepared liy the Sears-Hoehuck Agricultural
Foundation, allows where the principal exports go.
i
In the United Kingdom more of America's farm exports are consumed
than In any other nation. The United Kingdom uses more American cotton
than any other country, her annual consumption averaging around 1,580,910
bales. Germany Is In the market for nlmost as much cotton, using 1,011,014
pounds last year. The United Kingdom is the first market for American wheat
and flour, tobacco, corn sirup and condensed milk. She also takes large qunn-
, titles of dried fruits, oil cake, ment, meat products and corn.
Buying Power of the Farmer
2,739.88
5,830.36
T o tal estim ated receip ts, not including proposed t a x . . »13.2tn.72
R E C A P T 1f L A T IO N
T o ta l estim ated exp enses fo r th e y e a r ......................................... »27.3Dn.nn
T o ta l estim ated re ce ip ts not Including proposed t a x ......... »13J16.T2
913,210.72
614.179.2"
B a la n c e , am ount to be raised by d istrict t a x .............
D ated th is 25th day o f N ovem ber, 1924.
W M . D A L E . D is tric t C lerk.
A. G. A M ES, C h airm an
A tte s t:
Hoard
of
D irectors.
ORIGINAL ESTIMATE AM) ACCOUNTING SHEET.
School District No. HIS.
This original estimate shown in parallel columns the unit costs of the
several services, material and supplies lor the three fiscal years next preced­
ing the current year, the detail expenditures for the last one of said three pro
ceding fiscal years and the budget allowances and expenditures for six mouths
of the current year. ("S ix months of the current year” means six months of
the last school year).
I
J.£V
Expen d itu res and
budget
allow an ce
for rix m onth« of
ia st school year.
E x p en d itu res for th ree fiscal
y e a rs n ex t preceding last
school y e ar.
T3 3 -*■
c£i
*
v .
I I EM
— U
U
Ü
iel
« r.
5 V
2.-ti
Ï-2
i i "
ii'
glktj
X £ « ?
X 3 ¥ 1
IS
2*
j j * 11
* b '
£ ci
C ** A*-1
2 i l l «
9
T otal
......... 6
200.044 9
673.12
190.00
50.00
102.4)5
!«
(iS
& M-
P erson al Her vice i
3.900.00
3.399.97
2. P rin c ip a ls ................ $ 2,200.0«) $ 3.599.97
1.800.00
3,29*4.91
3. T each e rs, m e n . . . . ? 1,350.00 9 3,299.91
9,075.440
1.500.00
T ea ch e rs, m en . . . . $ 1,800.00 $10,330.00
1.400.00
T ea ch e rs, w o m a n ..$ 1.20ft .00
1,400.0t)
» 1,$4)3.00
2.800.00
9 1.26(4.00
5.400.00
9 1,305.00
S ix a t 9990................ $ 5,940.00
1.750.00 9 1.846.00
4. Ja n ito r s .....................9 1.7oo.oo 9 1 » o .o o
150.0«)
5. C lerk ........................... 9 150 no
1544.00
7. O ther se rv ic e s......... 9 1544.4)0
544.00
1 »omestic S c ien ce . .9
200.00
T o ta l ........................ $18,610.00 $19,179.91 9 JO.3440.00 917,619.91 $17,8741.70
M aterial anti Supplies!
1. F u rn itu re
1410.00 9 721.56 $
(desks, e t c . ) . . . . 9
2. Supplies.
(ch a lk , etc. ) . . . . $ 1.4)00.00
10.50
150.00
3. L ib ra ry l» o o k s ....9
144 00
4. F la g s . * Man. T r. 9
5. P laygrou nd
25.00
equipm ent ......... 9
6. Ja n ito r 's
150.00
1117
supplies ................ 9
569.50
•>50.00
7. Fu el ........................ $
33 J 56
350.00
8. L ig h t ........................ 9
100.00
9. W a te r ...................... 9 100.00
10. P ostag e and
102.80
35.00
statio n e ry ............ $
1.920.19
T o ta l ....................... $ 2,570.00
C oa«traetlo at
« -•"Cl
C;
T.
>.
$16.283.02
200.00
25.00
75.00
560.00
34)0.440
100.440
56 33
4 «2.4H)
277.12
100 .00
35.00
1.735.00 9 1.650.62 9 1,866.99 9 2.935.52
150.0*)
150.00
M a la tea a a re aa«t
R epair«
B u ild ings anil
50.00
grounds . . . . , . , . $ 1,600.00 « 1,176.31 I
Bu ild ings and
$ 500.0#
ground* . . . . . . . .
Bu ild ings and
$ 718.16 9 150.00
grounds . . . .
Bu ild ings and
9
7500
grounds . . . .
Bu ild ings and
I
<M»AA
ground.* . . . .
. . » I . SAo.no I 1.8 »*.»« $ I.175.AA
T o tal .........
t< w »a a ib
The purchasing power of farm commodities continues to rise. Latest esti­
mates show Hn average of 4.H points higher for the first eleven months of this
year than during the corresponding months of 1023, nceordlng to n report of
the Sears-Hoehuck Agricultural Foundation, based on the new Index numbers
of farm prices prepared by tbe United States Department of Agriculture.
Farm prices show a combined value of 134 on November 1, 10'24, as com­
pared with 100 in 1013. This combined Index number Includes 30 farm com­
modities which represent more than 00 per cent of the value of products sold
by farms, the Foundation points out. Using August, 1001), to .Tilly, 1014, ns 100,
tlie purchasing power of these products stood at N7 on November 1 of this year.
In 1018 the purchasing power w h s KSt, decreasing to 00 In 1021. In 191KJ It rose
to 74 and by 1023 the average stood at 73. During the first eleven months of
tills year the purchasing power of farm commodities averaged 82.3 as compared
with 77.5 In the same period a year ago.
Advances In grain, which averages about 22 per cent of the total vnlu*
Of farm products sold, and in price of ment animals, which averages 27 per
cent, have been the largest factors In the Increase of the farmer’s purchasing
power since 1021. The grain farmer received during the early part of this
year prices about 10 per rent above the pre-war five-year average. This had
risen to 30 per cent Increase by July. At the same time the general price
level of commodities the fnrnier has to buy ranges 30 to 80 per cent above the
1013 level.
9 4844.69
9 219 68
I
I
20.30
720.«;
I
101.75
I « a
I
1» 2«
t
l .» * t
iH ls k w s »«.
R «a.l>. Stree t«. R rM »»»it
t
S AM
T o ta l .................... I
la A e M e d a e ««:
*•■•*•
I. Hooded, and in ­
terest t h e r e o n . . . . ! 7.1 AA.no
Î W arran t, and In­
ternat thereon . . . .
T e la i
.................. I » 1*»
I Î.1AB AA I
*A.n*
X» 17 I
» 17 I Mina« •
» 1 * 1 .1 tt
It Is condition nnd quality rnther than weight that deride whether a steer
la to be placed In the b e e f cattle classification. Within the rlasa It is condi­
tion and quullty that largely determine the amount o f profit that goes to the
shipper. Choice to prime steers bring from 75 cents to $5.75 per hundred­
weight over the common light stock, according to a study made of lightweight
steers coming to the Chicago market by the Henro-Roebuck Agricultural Foun­
dation.
The bulk of the shipments are classified under the grades of prime steers,
1,200 to l.tWO pounds; choice steers, 1.150 to 1.000 pounds; good steer*, 1,150
to 1,000 pounds: medium steers, 1,100 to 1.4«»l pounds, nnd common rough
steers, (am to 1,200 pounds. These are the classifications of tha United Ststss
Bureau of Markets.
I’rime beef steers sre the Ideal type, combining exceptional breeding and
thorough finishing. Short neck and short legs, smooth flesh and well filled,
bulging briskets sre prerequisite*. • Prime beef steer* are rare, even »teera
good enough to grade a* choice are few. They show most of the characteris­
tics of the prime grade, good breeding and long feeding, smooth flesh and thick
fat. tin the block the quality *t>-*r will show a good proportion of red meat
covered with a modest amount of smooth white fat. Tha lean, while firm of
texture, will be mellow to the touch. The carcass should carry down full to
the hock, being hlfhly marbled with bright lean of a fine grain.