Eastern Clackamas news. (Estacada, Or.) 1916-1928, January 27, 1921, Page Page Four, Image 4

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    Pige Four
tastern Clackamas News
K'ltered at the postoffice in Eutacada,
Oregon, as second-class mail.
PuMished every Thursday at
Kutacada. Oregon
UPTON H. GIBBS
Editor and Manager.
SuBst'KirrioN R atios
$ 1.50
One year
six months
! ne
' • :
ii A.iv
.75
h
Thursday, Januaiy 27, 1921
EASTERN CLACKAMAS NEWS
in
.. .................. -«five
* Ml <• a ; l'i<- ■ .s •. :» « . / i i o n
"■■■■■" ■ ■ - ......
Thursday. January 27. 1921
Drawing the Tourist
At the last convention of the
Oregon State 10 lit-»rial Associa­
tion at Astoria, August 14th,
1920, the subjoined resolution
was unanimously adopted:
“ WHEREAS: The d e v H o p ­
inent of tourist travel means
millions of dollars annually to
Oregon, for wdiich the tourist
gets bigger value than can be
secured anywhere else in the
world, now, therefore, be it
“ RESOLVED: That we stand
ever ready to support the work of
the Pacific Northwest Tourist
Association, and h. lievc that the
promotion of tin* tourist travel is
a distinct asset to the state.’’
Four years ago Oregon was
looked upon only as a state cn
the way to other tourist regions,
hut today it is the object of
thousands of people who will
spend their vacation here.
Hundreds of letters are being
received from all over the Unit­
ed States asking for information
about Oregon from prospective
settlers and new
residents
through the publicity which the
Pacific Northwest Tourist Asso­
ciation has carried on. No high­
er tribute to the successful ex­
penditure of this money can he
imagined than the splendid edi­
torials which have appeared in
some of the biggest daily news­
papers throughout the United
States add Uanada. This work
should not only continue, but it
should he enlarged as much as
possible, l'odothe same amount
of work, even, that the associa­
tion has done in the past will re-
« juin* more funds because of the
increased cost of advertising
space and of printed matter.
I'he state has the cumulative
value of the past four years of
etfort which is a foundation for
the work of this coming and the
future years.
We have been the recipient
lately of bills, bills and yet more
hills. Fortunately they are leg­
islative and not duns.
LEND-A-HAND
We have received a communi­
cation from T. S. Dietrich of
Portland, on behalf of helping to
revive the Oregon state prison
paper, “ Lend-a-Hand.”
This
formerly was published by the
prisoners themselves, |but being
dependent on outside voluntary
subscriptions, was forced to sus­
pend. We append letters from
Governor Olcott and Warden
Compton showing the value in
prison reform of such a publica­
tion. The price is SI. 00 a year
and subscriptions may he mailed
to 'I'. S. Dietrich, 669 Everett St.
Portland. We gladly boost the
enterprise, for perchance if w*e
should ever write unadvisedly
with our pen, we might have an
enforced sojourn in the state pen.
Gov. Olcott writes: “ I wish to
say that the magazine “ Lend-a-
Hand,” which recently suspend­
ed publication, gave some highly
gratifying service, which 1 think
had splendid results both for the
men inside the walls and in
bringing about a clearer under­
standing of prison conditions to
people outside. A prison paper
properly edited and managed I
believe to he an excellent asset to
the institution and a strong fac­
tor in the betterment of prison
conditions. ”
Warden Compton w rites:
“ A prison paper is a very nec­
essary adjunct to any prison in
that it gives an added impetus
and interest in prison reform; ac­
quaints the world with character
of prison inmates, is conducive
to a more kindly interest and ev­
ery day consideration for prison­
ers, helps build up faith in hu­
manity and helps justify the
hope that is in them.”
“ With proper financial support
this paper could he made a great
factor in the community and in
the state at large. ”
For Fruit Growers
C. I. Lewis, manager of the
organization department of the
Oregon (1 rowers Co-operative
Association, is still strong for
prune, notwithstanding present
conditions, He savs that ulti­
mately. prunes will prove as they
have in the past, a gtx>d invest­
ment.
In the planting of cherries, he
calls attention to the fact that
Royal Anne. Ring and Lamberts
are not only self-sterile but that
with these varieties must he
planted the Long Stemmed Wa­
terhouse or some other good
pollen izer.
Internal Revenue Returns
To help taxpayers in making
their returns. J. J. Collins and
G. \ . Roberts deputy collectors
of Internal Revenue, will be at
the Oregon City Court House,
February 2nd to 25th inclusive.
These gentlemen will be happy
to render any aid taxpayeis may
require.
c T p e
Si R A D I V A R A
“K N O W N FOR T O N E '
^
PATE KITED
D on’t Class the Stradivara
w ith a Common T alking
Machine. : • • •
The Stradavara is a real instrument.
The
new
Patent Sounding Board gives
a tone that you do not get in any ctner
Phonograph.
Remember
also,
that
the
STR A D A V A R A is made in Oregon, and
when you buy one, you are helping keep up
Oregon pay roll.
m
Prices from $40.00 up.
dL
TERMS TO SUIT YOU.
THE U N I V E R S A L C A R
NEW PRICES
F reight and W a r
T ax
Included
ESTA CA D A :
Roadster
.......................................$529.84
Kor*dsler S ta rter.......................... 602.73
.................... 576.70
louring S ta r te r ................
640 SR
COUPE-
*
Starter and Demountable Rims 894 28
SEDAN—
Starter and Demountable Rims 946.34
Trucks Pneumatic Tires . . . .
674.78
1 ractor............................. ................ 890 35
Raker
GRESHAM
&
Son
ESTACADA