Eastern Clackamas news. (Estacada, Or.) 1916-1928, January 06, 1921, Page Page Six, Image 6

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    per month. Later the monthly
limitation was entirely removed
and the maximum amount in­
creased first to $1,000 and then
to the present amount, $2,500.
Postmaster General Burleson, in
the annual report just submitted
to Congress recommends increas­
ing the rate of interest to be
paid depositors and action by
Congress will, no doubt, be tak­
en along these lines within the
neor future.
Postal Saving News Bulletin
The United States Postal Sav­
ings System is today marking its
tenth anniversary by issuing a
new postal savings card which
has been in use since the estab­
lishment o f t h e System on
January 1, 1911.
The new card will be furnish­
ed free of cost and when ten 10-
cent postal savings stamps have
been affixed to it will be accept­
ed at any depository office as a
deposit of $1 or it may be re­
deemed in cash. The outstand­
ing featiue of the new card is
the translation into twenty-four
foreign languages of the state­
ment that the faith of the Unit­
er! States is solemnly pledged to
the payment of deposits made
with the System.
The Service was first estab­
lished at forty eight post offices,
one in each state, on January 1,
1911, and, although hampered
by many restrictions as to rate
of interest and maximum amount
allowed on deposit, it has shown
remarkable progress. Postmas­
ter General Burleson announces
that the amount on depos t t >day
is more than #>1(52,000,000 and
its depositors have long since
passed the one-half million mark.
As predicted by its propon­
ents in the days before the pas­
sage of the original Postal
Savin js Act, our foreign born
citizens have been the principal
patrons of the System. Taught
in their native countries to look
to the Government to safe-guard
their savings, they naturally ex­
pect this Government to do like­
wise. In the present flood tide
of emigration, each newcomer
as he leaves the port of entry,
receives a leaflet in his own lan­
guage outlining the method of
operation of the United States
Postal Savings System and urg­
ing upon him the desirability of
continuing in this country the
practice of thrift which has
been so necessary in the country
he has just left. The service is,
therefore, one of the most jh )-
tent factors in furthering the
Americanization movement.
Many banks, usually savings
banks, prior to the establish­
ment of the System felt that the
Postal Savings System would be
a strong competitor but expe­
rience has shown that the Postal
Savings System draws its pa­
trons not from depositors in es­
tablished a n d well-conducted
banks but from among those
who otherwise would not place
their money in any banking in
stitution whatever.
The original act of Congress
restricted the total amount to
1«» placed on deposit at $500 and
the deposit of this amount was
limited to not more than .$100
T h u rsd a y , J a n u a r y 6, 1921
EASTERN CLACKAMAS NEWS
Page Six
FOR SALE
One almost new Universal
range, also 22 in. Universal heat­
er, oak dining table, dining
chairs and library table. If tak­
en at once, 1 will sell my Baby
Grand Chevrolet automobile at a
bargain, used only six months.
Inquire at my residence on
Main Street. I). H. Morgan.
Parent-Teacher Meeting
Council Meeting
The following program will he
given by the Parent-Teacher As­
sociation at the High School au­
ditorium, Tuesday evening, Jan.
11, beginning at 7:30:
Violin Solo—T. Ahlberg
Address—Benefits of Organiz­
ed Play for Children, Miss A E.
Tozier, of Portland, Playground
Supervisor of Peninsular Park.
Vocal Solo—Miss Ruth Dillon.
Round Table — Conducted by
Mrs. Ida Holder; subject, “The
Regulation of Social Functions
During the School Week.
Every one interested in the
moral welfare of the town should
be present at the city council
meeting, Tuesday evening, when
opportunity will be given for the
discussion of midnight closing of
public dances.
Harold, the little son of Mr.
and Mrs, P. S. Stamp who has
been quite ill for some days, is
on the mem! and can be out part
of the time.
Undertakers, Embalmers and Funeral
Directors, Oregon City.
WM. D A L E
Representing
HOLMAN & PACE
STOCK ON HAND IN ESTACADA.
T elephone
Stock Sweetening.
The Estacada Feed Co. has
just received a supply of stock
molasses which is rapiJly being
taken. You better get your sup­
ply now before it is all gone.
J. W. Reed and J. V. Barr
went to Portland today, where
they will be present at a com­
mittee meeting on determining
the boundaries ol the proposed
division of the county.
A paper was circulated Wed­
nesday around town to secure
funds for helping the Carl Doug­
las Post purchase a stand for its
colors.
There was a slight covering of
snow on the hills south of town,
earlv yesterday morning.
G. P. Rose our popular m er­
chant is confined to his home
w'ith a bad cold.
The Family
Theatre
THURSDAY NIGHT
January 6th.
FR A N K K E EN A N
—
JN —
Midinight Stage.
SATURDAY NIGHT
January 8, 1921.
W. B. W ARNER
—I N -
THE LIAR.
S. P. PESZNECKER
Machine Shop
Oxy-Acetylene Welding
White Mazda Lamps
Soft L ig h t; Not Dim Lig h t
Plumbirg, Tinning
Electric Wiring
an d Repairing
Estacada, Oregon
¡U.YX
LOWER
/Séf
Seed Prices for 1921
O u r re s o u rc e s as F IR S ! H A N D G R O W E R S e n a b le s u s
to a g a in o ffe r o u r c h o ic e s tra in s o f V e g e ta b le S eed s a t
P re - W a r P rices. A ll th e p o p u la r Lilly q u a lity seed s—
s i « l i s t e d in o u r 1921 S eed A n n u a l a t
BEET
CABRAGE
CARROT
CELERY
CUCUM BER
L ETTUC E
MELON
B ig
P a ck et
,
J .
/7 >
J
r
ONION
R A PISH
r.r na - th
sv / U a s h
TOMATO
T UR NIP
RUTABAGA
P o s t­
paid
SPECIALS FOR 1921
O ur V e g e ta b le Scad N o v e ltie s are s d is tin c t a d v a n c e in their
r e e p e c U v ; c la e a e s— THE ACME OF PER FEC T IO N . S ee our
c a t a lo s ter lu ll d e s c r ip t o r o f th e se grand se le c tio n s.
_________ P er p a c k e t, IQ CENTS, P o stp a id
W R IT E for y o u r c o p y of L illy ’s 1821 Seed A nnual N o. 3), a lso
T O D A Y frse b o o k le t^ G a r d e n s of D e lig h t.” A p o stca rd w ill do.
THE CHAS. H. ULLY CO.
First show opens at 7 p.m. sharp
Prices: Adults 26c, war tax 6c.
Children 10c, war tax lc.
W. E. LINN, Manager.
1
SEA TTLE — PORTLAND
Y ou T D ealer C arries L illy's Seeds.