Eastern Clackamas news. (Estacada, Or.) 1916-1928, September 02, 1920, Image 10

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ADVANTAGE ALL WITH DAVID
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Scrap Book
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Uncle Sam Sets a Good Example
Modern M ilitary Men H a v e Figured
T h a t Goliath Never H a d a
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C hance to W in.
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:
P o p u la r sy m p a th y has a lw a y s been
the side of David In his little bick­
ering with the G iant G oliath.
It
ought to be q u ite the o th e r way, be­
cause th e re never w as a m in u te when
Goliath had a c hance ag a in st an agile
a n ta g o n is t who could choose his own
position and distance, and who wua
equipped with a long-range weapon.
T h is is a problem which ha s been
thoroughly worked out by m odern mili­
tary men and naval tac tic ian s. A fight
of th e kind cHn have only one re­
sult.
*
We a r e accustom ed to th in k of th e
sling a s an old-world w eapon, but
th e re Is no question of th e fa c t t h a t It
w ’ ms in common use am ong th e n atives
of Mexico. C e n tra l America an d Peru
long before G oliath and David were
horn. “
Dr. Philip A. M eans has been looking
up (lie subject for the S m ithsonian
In stitution, nnjl he says th a t th e early
Spanish con q u e ro rs in A m erica found
the sling a fo rm idable weapon In the
h a nds of the aborigines.
A S panish historian, Del Castillo, de­
scribing u b a ttle w ith M exican natives,
w r i t e s : ‘‘As we app ro a c h e d w ith our
a rm y th ey shot from above so m any
stones t h a t they covered th e ground.
T hey had slings an d plenty of stones,
and they shot a rro w s an d sto n e s so
fast th a t they w ounded five of ou r
foot soldiers and tw o h o rse m e n .”
In P e ru have been dug up m an y a n ­
cient vessels th a t b e a r p a in tin g s Illus­
tra tiv e of com bats In which slings w ere
used.
X eres, a n o th e r Spanish histo ria n , de­
scribing the c a p tu r e of a P e ru v ia n city,
says of the n a tiv e tro o p s : “ In th e v a n ’
of th e ir a rm y cam e the stlngiueu, «’ho
FROM THE PREHISTORIC A G E ; on
C a rl Hagenbeck’s S ta tu a ry of Monsters
of the P ast Is One of the Sights
of Ham burg.
*
1
4
*
U ndoubtedly the oddest collection of
fdatuitry In the world Is t h a t of llfe-
Mlzod cem ent Images of th e dinosaurs,
which Carl H agenheck, th e fam ous
collector of wild anim als, who supplies
most of the zoos and circuses in the
world, has m ade upon Ids e s ta te at
Hamburg.
As you probably know, th e din o sa u rs
were a s tra n g e race of a n im a ls who In­
habited the e a rth millions of ye a rs ago,
before man and th e o th e r m am m als a p ­
peared.
Some of them were much
larger th an elephants.
Some were
harm less, grazing, c re a tu re s , but o th ­
e rs were terrib ly carnivorous.
T h e a p p e a ra n c e of the din o sa u rs Is
known from fossil rem a in s which have
been found, a n d Mr. H agenheck has
had a c c u ra te likenesses m ade and
placed In lifelike p o stu re s In a park
about the edges of a little lake. If a
man who knew n othing about It were
to come suddenly upon th is place on
a moonlight night, he would prob­
ably know Just how some people who
do not live In dry c o u n trie s occasional­
ly feel, j
t
Pink e le p h a n ts and p u rp le k a n g a ­
roos would be n othing to th e image of
dlplodocus, the largest c re a tu r e th a t
ever walked the e a rth .
Mr. Hagen-
beck’s cement likeness of this anim al
Is (16 feet long, and Is seen quietly
. grazing In a little glade.
N earby u
frleeratops, w ith th re e h o rns on Its
head and w eighing a couple of tons. Is
lust em erging from the w a te r, while
a ty ra n n o s a u ru s — a c a rn iv o ro u s b ru te
bigger tban a buffalo— is rep re sen te d
In tile act of devouring Its prey. T h e re
a re HO of the m o n ste rs and more a re
to be made.
YANKS WOULD NOT BE DENIED
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Boys Made Good Aqainst Heavy Odds
In the Largest Battle in Am er­
ican History.
/
T h e Argonne-Meuse buttle fought by
o u r First arm y was the largest b a ttle A ncient P eru v ian P ain tin g Showing
Use of S lin g in Battle.
la American history, su.vs A rthur \V.
l*age In W orld's Work,
General P e r ­ hurled pebbles from slings. T h e s e
shing's forces engaged were about ten sllngm en c a rr y shields m ade from n a r ­
tim es as large as those of General Lee row hoards, very small.
T hey also
at Gettysburg. It was a vital elem ent w ear a rm o r ju c k e ts m ade of quilted
In the conquest of the G erm an forces cotton.”
*
an d our main contribution to the w a r ’s
Many of the a c tu a l slings used by
decision. T he ttrst great battle of th e | early a n d even p re h is to ric A m ericans
new llrltlsli arm ies the Somme—«>«*• j have been o btained from g rav e s or
ctirred
m onths a f te r Great B ritain o th e rw is e recovered. T hey a r e m ade
entered the war. Our arm y went Into of v arious m ate ria ls. Including hum an
Its first great struggle 1M m onths a f t e r j h a ir, w o o l , llama h a ir and vegetable
ou r declaration.
H alf of the troops fiber.
and divisional stnP's were green, and
our c o r p s and a rm \ stuffs had had hut
T h « Reform of a Poet.
the very scanty b a ttle experience ac
H
a
rry
Kemp, “ tr a m p poet.” who left
quircd In the Maine Vc-le cam paign i
K
a
n
s
a
s
u
n iversity ten y e a rs ago to
under the French and our own o p e ra ­
figure
In
m any esca p a d e s in the
tion at Si. Mlldel. T he place to be a t ­
F
a
s
t
and
finally
to become a suc­
tacked ' mis extrem ely difficult, an d
cessful
poet
and
playrlgbt In New
Gen. von dor M arwlta and Ids tro o p s }
York,
has
a
d
v
e
rtis
e
d in a L aw rence
were seasoned and form idable o p p o ­
p
a
p
e
r
a
request
asking
his c re d ito rs
n e n t s . F a d e r the c.rcutnstanees it w a s
of
e
a
rlie
r
d
ay
s
to
get
to
g e th e r their
Just as reasonable ft» look for a t e r r i ­
old
hills
that
th
ey
may
ta k e them
ble c u tas.rnphe such «s befell the B r it­
to
a
d
in
n
e
r
he
will
give
th
e re s h o rt­
ish at Gallipoli, the French in the
ly.
A
fter
the
d
in
n
e
r
he
prom ises
(Miampavne In 1017. or the G erm ans
to
pay,
all
his
old
debts.
A s the old
In the Cham pagne In July. 101S, «s to
hym n ha s It: “ W hile th e lights hold
look
for a decisive v icto r' * -p " e r h a p * s
$
out
to b u n H nful poets may re tu r n .”
w o rn no.
•
—
D
e
tro it !• ree Press.
T h e sta te of ottr arm y would natn- |
ra lly have suggested spending live or
six m onths more in prep a ra tio n for
such a tusk. T he s ta te of the w ar In­
c o n tin e n tly demanded that " e tackle
th e problem Immediately In w hatever
s h a p e we w ere to handle It.
y
H .s Occupation.
“T h e y put the •«•turned soldier a t
th e n o c k m a k e r s to p utting figures on
th e dials.“
* ♦
“T h e n he m u s t have felt a t bom#
m a rk in g tim e.”
V IE W
OF
U. S,. C A P I T O L
D U R IN G
P A IN T IN G .
T h e dom e of the U nilea m a t e s Capitol a t W ashington is kept in excel­
lent condition by paint l u ; It every few years. F o r th is work forty p a in te rs
a r e steadily employed for th re e m onths' time. O ver five th o u sa n d gallons of
paint a r e required for one coat. T h e reason for p a in tin g th e Capitol dom e a t
re g u la r i n t e r 'u l s is to p rev e n t d isin te g ra tio n of m etallic surface.