Eastern Clackamas news. (Estacada, Or.) 1916-1928, August 19, 1920, Page Page Four, Image 4

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    I served each day, the only t-rouble
| being to find room for and digest
A letter from a friend visiting what is so abundantly provided,
in Argentina, not far from Bue­ j Under these conditions enter-
nos Aires, states that winter is ! taimng has no terrors for a host­
ess, neither does the guest feel
now on in those parts, and that that he may be causing a lot of
it is summer when winter is here. extra trouble and work, so hospi-
Last Christmas Day the weather : tality is without restraint and
was sizzling hot. The writer is j unbounded.
staying with relatives on a large E s ta c a d a ’s P o pu latio n
cattle ranch, and at Christmas
192 0 C en su s
all hands of which there are over
Estacada’s population accord­
a hundred were invited to a big ing to the recent census is 483.
celebration. A sumptuous din­ The precincts in the vicinity are
—
ner was provided, at which each given as follows:
Barton,
303;
Boring,
516;
Do­
man received a bottle of wine
ver, 161; Eagle Creek, 381; Esta­
and cider imported from Spain.
cada, No. 1, 354; Estacada, No.
The owner of the ranch was host 2, 542; George, 118; Logan, 400;
and gave lavish presents to his Springwater, 351; Viola, 279.
Population of i n c o r p o r a t e d
hands and their families. It re­
towns
o f Clackamas County:
calls the old plantation days of
Barlow, 42; Canby, 852; Esta­
the South, when there was no
cada, 483; Gladstone, 1069; Mil-
servant problem, and each white waukie, 1172; Molalla, 496; Ore­
person had his own attendant. gon City, 5686; Oswego, 1818;
Many and elaborate meals are Sandy, 242; West Linn, 1628.
Inverted Seasons
The Democratic presidential
nominee has gained one recom­
mendation. By his stand on the
League of Nations he has incur­
red the displeasure of William R.
Hearst.
Eastern Clackamas News
K i*«*red at the postoffice in Estacada,
Oregon, as second-class mail.
Published every Thursday at
Estacada, Oregon
There has been much written
about the immodesty of the one-
piece bathing suits for women.
Those we saw at the beach were
modesty itself, compared to the
decollete evening gowns at a
swell society function.
U P T O N II. G IB B S
Editor and Manager.
SlIHSC’ RIPTION
One year
.
t ix month»
.
RATKS
.
-
$1. 50
-
-
.75
When passing Gresham Sunday
we noticed a strawberry patch
with a number of castor oil plants
growing among the vines. We
speculated as to whether this was
intentional or accidental, and on
recalling our c h i l d h o o d expe­
rience, the combination seemed
congruous.
I o n 1" ii A d v i i l i “ in^ Ki-presentativi?
11II
Thursday, August 19, 1920
EASTERN C L A C K A M A S N E W S
Pcge Four
\MI Mil AN HKK: S ASSOC I A'i ION
Thursday, August 19. .1920
As You
L ik e It
The following are two repre­
sentative samples of editorial
opinion on Covernor Cox’s speech
of acceptance. As the peddler
replied to the little hoy who asked
him which article he had better
purchase, “ You pays y.mr money
and you takes your choice.”
The Oregonian He wobbles
between opposing views on ques­
tions which till at least as laige
a place as the league in the pub­
lic mind. He clothes his plea for
votes in an inordinately long but
skillfully framed structure of
words, which must be taken
apart in order to discover his
meaning.
The Journal
Governor Cox
will grow in popularity as the
campaign advances. The powers
of thought ami expression re­
vealed by his address of accep­
tance mean that his will be a
campaign of his order and one
that will win from his country­
men increasing confidence in his
purpose and in his powers.
..................................... ..........................
The Oregon State Editorial
Convention which met last week
at Astoria, passed resolutions op­
posing the entry into the state of
the Non-Partisan league, and
condemning the five per cent in­
terest bill. They also advocated
in view of the shortage of news­
print, laws for curtailing the size
of metropolitan papers to GO
pages on Sundays and 24 pages
on week days. The former in
our judgment, will not suffer but
be improved by the curtailment.
W o u ld Ruin the State
...
From t h e American papers
Ireland is seething in revolt, civil
war and upheaval. Hut letters
from England t o t h e writer,
never even refer to it. By the
way why don’ t the Sinn Fein get
in touch with Sir Edward Carson
instead of Lloyd George? The
British government cannot aban­
don Ulster to take its chances
with the southern portion of Ire­
land under a hostile regime. If a
satisfactory arrangement can be
made between these two, the
British government would thank­
fully and eagerly acquiesce.
It pays to take a vacation. This
does not mean idleness but rest
and change from the ordinary
routine. It does not do to stav
at home, for if one does, there
will be no change or getting out
of the old rut. Even if a man
d o e s nothing but loaf around
while gone, he is recuperating
his worn and exhausted energies
and comes back reinvigorated to
tackle again the daily round and
common task.
|
In many localities throughout
Oregon meetings h a v e been
called for discussion among farm­
ers and business men, of a con­
stitutional amendment, proposed
by initiative which is to limit the
legal rate o f interest to be
charged in the state of Oregon to
4 per cent on all moneys after
they became due, and 5 per cent
on what are known as contract
loans. The measure will go be­
fore the voters at the general
election to be held Tuesday, No­
vember 2.
it is estimated that 70 per cent
of money loaned in Oregon comes
from outside the state and this
would be withdrawn over night
if such a nvasure as this should
pass.
The wording o f the proposed
measure appears to benefit the
borrower by giving him cheap
interest rates but low rates with­
out any money to borrow will not
help the man needing money.
With the U. S. government
paying G per cent for money what
chance would individuals in Ore­
gon stand to get it at 4 and 5 per
cent?
FranKlin T. Griffith, president
of Portland Ry. L t «fcPowerCo..
says the measure would literally
ruin the state. It would close
in lustries and throw thousands
of men out o f work.
W E H A V E J U S T R E C E IV E D A C A R
i
LOAD OF TH ESE
TRACTORS
Better select yours before
they are ail gone.
,
GRESHAM
l
^
Light Lunches
and
Confectionery
Pipes
and
Tobacco
*
j
Cigars
and
Cigarettes
M ade to Measure
Clothes
For Men
R. G. M A R C HB A N K
E stacada, O r e g o n
!
Popcom
and
Peanuts
Phonographs
and
Records
I
¥
I