Eastern Clackamas news. (Estacada, Or.) 1916-1928, April 22, 1920, Image 9

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    SUPPLEMENT
E A S T C L A C K A M A S N E W S , A P R I L 22, 1920
Why the Electric Cleaner?
There is really no comparison between the ease
and thoroughness with which an Electric Cleaner
removes dirt and the difficulty of sweeping.
9
True, one C A N clean rugs and carpets wthout an
electric cleaner. A broom or carpet sweeper will brush
up S O M E of the dirt; and if you like the exercise and
have plenty of time and strength a broom and a carpet
beater will do the work after a fashion.
In the same way one can wash without soap
W ater alone will remove some dirt if applied with
enough “ elbow grease.”
But people use soap because it cleans more easily
and better than water alone.
PAitJT
For the same reason people use Electric Cleaners
because they clean more easily and far better than other
EVER has there been a better reason for
preserving your property than at the present
time.
N
\
High costs o f construction have greatly, increased
the value of homes and buildings, no matter how
old they might be.
*
Paint— GOOD Paint, will do more to preserve and
increase the value of your property than anything
else you can possibly invest in. It is the greatest
safeguard against the ravages of time and weather.
It is the best kind of insurance.
SALVATION ARM Y M A K E S
MEN OF S O C IA L OUTCASTS
Guard your home and buildings with
FULLER Paint
and other products. Back of them are 71 years of
paint-making experience. Thousands of property
owners have used these products for years.
Look Up a FULLER Dealer
in Your Town
W. P. Fuller & Co.
Northwest Branches at
Portland. Seattle, Tacoma, Spokane, Boise
2
■ i
M. E. C h u r c h
There will be service* both m>rning
and evening next Sunday at 11:00 a. nr
and 7:30 p. m. Sunday School at 10:00
a. m.. Young People’s M;eting at 6:3)
p. m.
Everyone cordially invited to
attend these services.
J. F. Dunlop, Pastor.
CHK JiFW W E S T M A O A Z I N B
"n .ild in c T h « W e .t"
Established 1910— For th« develojwnent of
W ärtern indtutri«., a*ri«-ulture, mining, oil. and
g e n e attraction *. O f interert to the W erten»
Invertor, farm er and righUeer. Printed on high
grade paper with copper half-tone illustration«.
Tear. $2; copy. 20c. Sample, 10c. S hack num­
ber* for tfc . Send now. The N ew West M aga.
aine. 1211 W a lk e r Bank Bldg.. Salt I ^ k e C ty.
TJtah ; 100* White B ldg . Seattle, W arh. : 7J0
W oodw ard Ave.. Detroit, Mich.
Addreaa near­
art office, or place your *ub*criptton through
V
A HEALING LOVE.
When forth Into life’» rt>ugh highway
they fare
To make anew each old mistake
And lade themselves with error-purchased
care.
Let not the old home love forsake
Them In that piteous hour of sorest need
As In a hostile world they roam.
Instead, this gentle resolution heed:
Love still shall wait for them at horns.
The wrong things they may do you'll not
condone;
Still is no need to stand aghast
Or speak to them in barsli and chiding
tone—
Ood knows they know, and It Is past.
One time you kissed the baby hurts of
them
As they sobbed to you. In the gloao.
There’ll be no lack of those who will
condemn—
So let love wait for them at home!
—Strickland Gillllan, In Farm Life.
Y
methods.
E L E C T R IC S fO R E
E L E C T R I C B U IL D IN G .
\
BUY YOUR
ELECTRIC GOODS AT AN ELECTRIC STORE
Following a well known ro!o the
Salvation Army, in Its industrial
homes, is taking the class of man who
early finds his way to the poor house
and rehabilitates him, makes him
over, gives him confidence in himself
and turns him over to employment
that enables him to sustain himself.
The County Government makes ts
"down and outs” habitual indigents.
It makes them a monthly allowance
of money or goods for which it re­
quires no service
The Salvation Army t kes the same
man and gives him, not money, but
work.
It pays h m money for his work, and
renews in him the knowledge that
conscious and directed effort is entitled
to and will bring him commensurate
return.
>
It bathes him and wins him again
to clean habit aud thought.
It builds up hit strength and his
morale until he is fit again for the
fight with th i arid.
Then it finds him employment and
sends him forth to work that he is
fitted to do.
Here in a nut shell is the story of
the
Salvation
Army’s
Industrial
Homes and the story of the Industrial
Home in Portland, where scores of men
from all over the state have io ud
themselves.
^
Ail Gall.
*
“ Vhjit hse heeome of the lion l’Iush-
duh. who dld ever.vtWng he enuM last
•“ •salon tu handicap ftie nrmv?"
"He's ouf «fie r the snldler vite.” —
l.ouisvilie t ’ourler-J ou mal.
SALVATION ARMY flhSC.c
WEEK YiAY 1 l ü MA ’0
Following the '..outing of the ad­
visory board repu scuta vos in con­
vention in Port and
arch 17, John
L. Ktheridge, appointed to the post
of state president of the financial
phase of the Home Service program
of 11*20, started to form h s commit­
tees under county preside!,
through­
out the state
The dates of May 1 to Miy 10 weie
picked for the financial catppaign 'to
meet the budget of $2K4,000 approved
by the convention, at whioh were
representatives of nearly every county.
The period was designed as Rescue
Wepk because all of the funds raised
during the period will be devoted to
the work of rescuing the poor from
their poverty, the unfortunate and
downfallen from their slough of de-
Hpond and the girl mothers from their
betrayal.
The work is carried or among peo­
ple in all walks of life, among chil­
dren, among young men and young
women who have fallen behind in the
race of life, among old men and old
women whose years are drawing to a
close.
The work of the army is always
constructive. Throughout forty years
of work ii #lhe slums of larger cities
the organization has developed lines
of service that no other organization
wo».. * or could enter upon.
Wasted Sympathy.
"Ton know Inst night they got Into
the grocer’s, broke open Ids safe and
took W.onO.”
” He «hf'iild worry! He’ll get that
buck In a few days.” —New York
W orltl.