Eastern Clackamas news. (Estacada, Or.) 1916-1928, December 11, 1919, Image 9

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    SUPPLEMENT
EAST CLACKAMAS NEWS, DECEMBER 11, 1919
CROSS IS TO BE EPISCOPAL SHRINE
CHURCH ESTABLISHES PRECEDENT
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The historic “Prayerbook Cross,” in Golden Gate Park, San Fran­
cisco, which shortly is to be consecrated by the Protestant
Episcopal Church as its first shrine.
San Fran cisc o shortly is to have hills in Golden Gat e P a r k .
T h e cross was c o n s ec r a te d sev­
th e honor of the tirst shri ne ever
c o n sec ra ted by the P r o te s t a n t Epis­ e n te e n y e a r s ago ub a m e m o r ia l to the
copal Church and th e first, it is con­ first rel gious service eve r held on the
fidently believed by m em b e rs of the Pacific Coast in t h e En g l is h lan g ua g e.
church, in a chain of wayside shrin es On J u n e 24, 1579, t h a t h a r d y buc­
along the mighty automobile high- c an eer , Sir F r a n c i s D r a k e , miss ing the
ways which now span the continent, p or t of San F r a n ci s c o e n ti r el y owi ng
T u r ne d by th e griefs of war to i to fog a n d s t o r m , lan d e d at w h a t is
m o re devout co ns id é râ t. on of affairs | r o w k n o w n as D r a k e 's Bay, n o r th -
religious and stirred to militancy by war d of San
F r a n ci s c o
Bay.
In
the Nation-wide campaign now for- ti .a n k - g iv i n g for t h e escape of t h e e x ­
ward within the church. Epi scopalians pedition f ro m th e s t o r m they all “ fell
of the Bay cities have laid before Rt to p r a y e r s , ” in t h e q u a i n t l a n g u a g e of
Rev. William Ford Nichols, D D., t h e c h ro n i c le r of t h e expedition.
B.shop of the Diocese of California,
T h e cross was erec tod by George
a proposal to c on sec ra te and proclaim
W. Childs, of Ph i la d e lp h i a . T h e cer-
the historic "Praverhook Cress
in
¿ o l d e n Gate Park as a shrine for all «".on e8 ,n c o n s e c r a ti n g the cross as
a s h r i n e will h i c e le b r a t e . d u r i n g the
w a v f a r i n g Episcopalians.
co
mi n g N a t io n - W id e Ca m p a ig n of the
T h e " P r a y e r b o o k F r o - s " is a m a g ­
Episcopal
C h u rc h, as a m e m o r ia l to
nificent pile which s u r m o u n t s one
th
e
ca
m
p
a
ig
n.
o f t h e most p i ct ur esq ue ly b e a u tif u l
Do your Christmas shopping
Mr3. J. C. Hillman after some
and mail your packages early so
days’ indisposition is now out
as to avoid the rush and prevent
a>rain.
congestion in the mails.
Modern Poultry Culture
By P l l l L . MARQUAM.
A Few Essentials of Poultry
Farming.
T h e r e Is a good dea l m o r e to t h e
p o u l t r y b u s in e s s t h a n m e r e ly t h r o w ­
ing g r a i n to th e h e n s a n d g a t h e r i n g
up th e eggs.
If t h e s e w e r e all t h e
e s s e n t i a l s c o n n e c t e d wi th
po u l tr y
w o r k , t h e n p r o b a b l y few would m a k e
a f a i l u r e of it.
In t h e first place,
ho w e v e r , t h e m a t t e r of f e e d i n g sh o u ld
be t h o r o u g h l y u n d e r s t o o d . It is n o t
e n o u g h , as said above, m er e ly to
t h r o w g r a i n to t h e fowls. T h e c o m ­
posit io n of t h e v a r i o u s feeds, th e m is ­
c e ll a n e o u s w o r k t h e y a r e r e q u i r e d
to do, t h e a m o u n t ne c es s a ry for e ach
fowl, a n d o t h e r t h i n g s m u s t be t a k e n
i nt o c o n s i d e r a t i o n . Fe e d, at t h e o u t ­
set, Is w h a t ke e ps up t h e bodily h e a t
of t h e hen, r ep la ces t h e n a t u r a l w e a r
of t h e body, su p p li e s th e m a t e r i a l
w h i c h is so e s se n t ia l to life, a n d a f t e r
t h e s e d e m a n d s of t h e h e n he rs e l f a r e
m e t . t h e s u r p l u s feed, if t h e r e be
a n y, goes i nt o eggs.
F i r s t , th e d e ­
m a n d s of t h e h e n ’s body m u s t be
met.
If s h e is given feed e n o u g h ♦
t o , e n a b l e h e r to m e e t t h e s e d e m a n d »
a n d no m o re , t h e n t h e egg b a s k e t
will r e m a i n e m p t y .
T h e hen is an
e x a c t in g c r e a t u r e . She will not build
a n e g g - u n t i l s he h a s t h e m a t e r i a l s
wf tn Which to bui ld it.
la o t h e r
w or ds , s he c a n n o t do h e r work w i t h ­
o u t t h e p r o p e r m a t e r i a l s to wor k
wi th .
T h e a v e r a g e f a r m e r gives his liens
b u t on e k i n d of feed — usually w h e a t
o r oats, a n d possibly o y s t e r shell, but
t h e s e a r e all. Now let us see w h a t
h a p p e n s w he n a he n is fed s u c h a
ra t i o n . To beg in with, an egg c o n ­
t a i n s a b o u t o n e q u a r t e r o u n c e of
p r ot e in .
T h e a v e r a g e hen m ay e a t
a b o u t f o u r o u n c e s of w h e a t a day.
She will use a b o u t t h r e e o u n c e s of
t h i s for h e r ow n bodily needs. And
t h a t leave s o n e o u n c e to m p k e eggs
wit h.
An o u n c e of wheat c o n t a i n s
a b o u t o n e - t e n t h o u n c e of pr otein .
Upon th is r a t i o n a hen would get
e n o u g h p r o t e i n to m a k e an egg a b o u t
eve ry t h r e e o r f o u r days. M oreover,
to build a n egg a b o u t on e q u a r t e r
oun c e of lim e is ne ces sa ry. An o u n c e
of w h e a t c o n t a i n s less t h a n one-
t e n t h as m u c h lime as o ne egg 'co n­
tains. T h e egg also c o n t a i n s a b o u t
on e q u a r t e r o u n c e of f a t ; b u t a n
o u n c e of w h e a t wou ld c o n ta i n a b o u t
t h r e e q u a r t e r s of an o u n c e of fat p r o ­
du cers. U roni t h e above, It m a y be
seen t h a t , if fed w h e a t alo ne , t h e lien
would get e n o u g h p r o te in to m a k e an
egg ab o ut every t h r e e o r f o u r da ys ;
e n o u g h lim e to nitrite a n egfc a b o u t
e^ery t w e l v e days, arid e n o u g h c a r b o ­
h y d r a t e s a n d f a t to m a k e . t h r e e eggs
a day. As a c o n s e q u e n c e , w h a t h a p ­
pens? To be s u r e , s h e m i g h t m a k e
up for t h e deficiency of p r o te in in t h e
above r a t i o n , by p u t t i n g t h e s u r p l u s
f a t into t h e egg, b u t t h e hen does not
t r a n s a c t bu sin e ss on t h a t basis. Hhe
is an ho n e s t m a n u f a c t u r e r , a n d if It
is not possible for h e r to p u t the
r i g h t m a t e r i a l s into h e r egg, s h e w m I
not p r o d u c e th e egg. P r o f i t e e r i n g is
not in h e r line a n d so on t h e abov e
ra t i o n bit*1 w o ul d e i t h e r lay very few
eggs, o r p e r h a p s n o n e at all, t h e s u r ­
plus feed p r o b a b l y going i nt o fat on
t h e body of th e hen .
In an a r t i c l e of th is kind It would
he i m p r a c t i c a b l e to go fully Into the
scientific sid e of p o u l tr y f ee di ng , but
a few g e n e r a l pr ac tic a l h i n t s will be
given on how to b a la n c e a r a t i o n for
t h e p r o d u c t i o n of eggs.
T h e first
t h i n g to be c o n s id e r ed is t h e “ n u t r i ­
tive r a t i o , ” which is t h e r a t i o 6f p r o ­
tein to fat in th<> h e a t p r o d u c i n g
foods. T h e s e e l e m e n t s , for good egg
pr od u ct i o n , s h o u l d be in t h e p r o p o r ­
tion of a b o u t on e p a r t p r o t e i n to
a b o u t fo u r p a r t s of th e fat a n d c a r ­
b o h y d r a t e e le m e n t s .
Now t h e r e is
■'nothing m y s t e r i o u s a b o u t this. Th e
ca se m i y be i l l u s t r a t e d as follows:
T h e p r o te i n e l e m e n t goes to build
m us cl e ( le a n m e a t ) a n d t h e a l b u m i ­
no us p a r t of t h e egg. T h e c a r b o h y ­
d r a t e a n d fat e l e m e n t s f urn is h heat
a n d f a t for th e body of t h e hen, a n d
fat fo r t h e egg.
And so, it a hen
is fed w h e a t a lo ne t h e c a r b o h y d r a t e
a n d f a t e l e m e n t s o v e r b a l a n c e the p r o ­
tei n e l e m e n t s to such an extent th a t
t h e hen would not only lack sufficient
m a t e r i a l to r eb u il d t h e n u t u r a l w ea r
of h e r body, b u t would have very
li t tl e of t h e pro tein e le m en t to p u t
i n to th e a l b u m i n o u s part of the egg.
At t h e s a m e time, s he would get a
g r e a t excess of tat a n d heat p r o d u c ­
ing e l e m e n t s which s he could not
m a k e use of so f a r as egg pr od u ct i o n
was c o nc ern ed , a n d th e excess would
p r o b a b l y go into fat on th e body of
t h e hen, i n st e a d of into eggs in th e
egg ba sk et.
(To be c o n ti n u e d )
THE MNG
and
THE KiD
San F r a n c i s c o — This o ug h t to be
a sho rt story and its title o u g h t to
be " T h e King a n d the Kid.”
The King I t Albert of Belgium.
The kid is R ic ha rd Slprelle of San
Fran cis co , eleven years old. Th e
K in g had e n t e r e d his au to m o bi le
a f t e r his official reception a t the
City Hall here a n d no d o u b t
t h o u g h t himself safe, s u r r o u n d e d
cs I o was by secret service men,
soldiers, and police.
E n t e r the
kid: leaping on the r u n n i n g b o a rd
of King Al be rt' s machine, he
t h r u s t into th e King's
hand
a
t hrift S t a m p with a card on which
to p as te it.
" K i n g Alb ert ," said th e kid to
the King, " d o n ' t you wa n t a T h r if t
S t a m p ? ’ T h e boy with his na tty
ov ers ea s s o ld i e r ’s cap In hand
smilingly a wa ite d I ivt ans we r. T h e
King took the card a n d s t a m p ; said
"TJiank you,” and the incident
in th e K i n g ’s life and Ihe epic In
the ki d's life closed then and t h e r e
with a f or w ar d lurch of th e aujo-
moblle, h aving th e kid behind.
“ I Just w an te d t h e
King
to
k n o w , ” said Ric hard, " w h a t a
ch an ce Ame ric a gives ns kids to
le a r n how to save so that when the
King gets back home maybe he
will m a k e T hr ift S t a m p s (or Bel­
gian kids.
T h e ne w s p a p e rs said
t h a t I w a nt e d two-hits * for the
s t a m p h ut 1 d id n 't. I am going to
w ri te th e King a le t te r and see if
he w o n ’t send me bis ph ot o gr a ph
with his n a m e on It."
?
Needless to say, Rich ard Siprelle
is In the movies, so if you see a
pi ct ur e of the King in his a u t o m o ­
bile with a kid on th e r u n n in g
boa rd, you will kno w all ab o ut It.
SLAVES OF CHANCE
“Th e habit of th rift te n d s to g.vn
clear eyes, good digestion, efficient
muscles * * « Young people, e s ­
pecially, should economize, always re
memberitig th at we should have eve ry­
thing we really need. It is folly to
skimp in eating for the sake of saving,
or to wear dowdy raiment. Have what
you need, but do not buy things you do
not need. But tb èr e is a Joy In going
without things *t tine tang In elimi­
nating the superfluous.
9
“ Loving labor and thrift go hand In
hand. He who is not thrifty Is a slave
to circum: tance. Fate cays, 'Do this
or starve,' and if you 1 ave no surplus
saved up you are the plaything of
chance, the pawn oi circum.-uam e. c \
slave of some one's caprice, i leal '
a storm .”— Elbert Hubna.d.
V