Eastern Clackamas news. (Estacada, Or.) 1916-1928, October 30, 1919, Page Page Four, Image 4

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    EASTERN CLACKAMAS NEWS
P i? e Four
Gast«rn Clackamas News
Eober^d at the postoliice in Estacada,
Oregon, as second-class mail.
Published every Thursday at
Estacada, Oregon
UPTON H. GIBBS
Editor and Manager.
—
' —
—
8 im * s <: kii * tion K atks
*)ne yeur
.
.
.
$1.50
Six months
-
-
-
.75
Thursday,
Oct. 30. 1919
All Hallowe’en
Tomorrow will be the eve of
All Hallows or All Saints Day.
It is the time when witches and
sprites are supposed to roam
around and leave vestiges o f
their visits behind them. We
would suggest to thejn, for they
of course read this paper, or else
they would not know enough to
be witches, that harmless fun is
the order o f the night, but dam­
age to property and ill natured
pranks are out o f order. The
grown ups to whom such diver­
sions no longer appeal, should
remember they were once young
and endure with a good natured
grin, any little inconvenience
which may ensue. In connect­
ion with the occasion as being
suitable, we publish a ghost
story, from the land o f Tam o ’
Shanter, who has done more
than on.v other individual to im­
mortalize All Hallowe’en.
The threatened strike of the
soft ,coal miners, in spite of the
reasons they give, looks to the
public as a hold up. which prom­
ises if successful, to double the
price of coal. It is to be hoped
that the government will act
firmly and expeditiously in the
matter, redressing any legiti­
mate grievance o f the miners
and saving tin* public from the
suffering which such a strike
would entail this winter.
THE SPECTRAL PIPER.
T lie following story was told by a
clergyman at a Hallowo'n party:
“ I had once an old parishioner, a
Scotch woman, who was primed full
of legends ghostly and otherwise, of
her native land. The Scotch have a
decided superstitious streak in them.
It is the Scotch who enjoy second
sight, ami behold the wraths of their
friends. An old Scotch family is sure
to posM's. an apparition, who warns
them of impending death. Many an
hour did 1 spend, listening to this
auld w it. - Mi - ; about (.¡latuis Castle
with its mysterious room, the loca­
tion of which and its secret are
known only to three persons, the
earl, his heir oil attaining his major­
ity and the steward of the estate;
also ot Koslyn Chapel, of Edinburgh
Castle and Holy Kood.
“ Hut one which she called the
I'pcrtral Piper, she knew for a fact,
l « cause >he had both seen and heard
him. When she was a girl of eight*
ceil, slu visit«»,1 sonu' friends in the
north of Scotland not far from Hal-
moral. This family traced their lin­
eage far back, and I believe claimed
as a torch« ar. Scott’s outlaw chief­
tain Roderick Phu. Their house w as
large and was hunt on a terrace lac­
ing the gardens, beyond which
teiMled.au expanse of grwensv^ard
the river, which flowed thro U$h rci
grounds.
**
“ At the time of her visit., the ?
Crimean war was in’.progress and tfy- •
head Of til«“ house absent at tin-
front with his regiment. Matters
w ere being very
iiaddled, as is
customary with the- British.
One
«lay at dusk, sho was returning to
the house from the village, and as
she walked through the gardens, she
noticed a Highland piper, preparing
to blow his pipes, standing beneath
tiie laird’s bedroom window-. She
was much surprised and a little
startled, as there was something un­
canny about the man. However, as
she neared the terrace steps, he
turned and disappeared.
She in­
tended to ask about him, but as she
was late, she had to hurry to dress
for dinner, during which the matter
momentarily slipped her mind, as
tlie conversation was about war. Nor
did she refer to it that evening. She
said afterwards, that whenever she
was about to do so, something
checked her. Her bedroom faced the
terrace, and was situated in the same
corridor as the laird’s.
“ She soon fell asleep, after get­
ting into bed, from which she was
awakened by hearing the skirl of a
bagpipe.
Jumping up, she looked
out of the window-, on the terrace.
The night, was cloudy, so she could
not see distinctly, but presently the
moon broke through a cloud. Thu
sound of a bagpipe continued, drew
nearer and seemed to he coming
from around the corner. Pretty soon
she distinguished a figure approach­
ing, which she recognized as that of
the man she had noticed on her re­
turn late in the afternoon. He con­
tinued to advance, playing a sort or
a dirge, until lie arrived underneath
tlie laird’s room, where he halted.
Just then, tlie moon disappeared,
and she could no longer make out his
figure, but the sound of the dirge
continued a few minutes longer.
“ When morning came and she went
down to breakfast, the family seeme«!
to he disturbed and the servants
looked somewhat awed. The hostess
was not present, her oldest daughter
explaining that her mother was suf-
fering from a severe headache, and
had not slept that night. She then
asked, ‘ 1 wonder if your mother was
kept awake by the piper, who wok«*
me up about two in tlie morning?’
These words caused consternation,
the daughter bursting into tears, and
hurriedly leff the room, followed
soon after by her younger sister.
Amazed, she questioned the govern­
ess as to what was the matter, who
replied that according to the family
legend, the appearance of the piper
betokened the death of, or imminent
danger to the head of the house.
‘Last night Lady VI------ w-as terribly
upset by hearing tlie sound of pipes,
hut we hoped it was imagination, hut
j
it you who did not know tlie legend,
heard and saw the piper, 1 am afraid
the laird is badly wounded, if not
worse.’
“ In those days, news took time to
travel, but at last the intelligence ar­
rived, that tin* laird had fallen at the
head of his regiment, in the battle of
lnkernian, and that he had died from
his wounds at tlie very time the girl
raw and heard tlie piper underneatn
his bedroom window.
"I have repeated the tale as she
told it to me, and I can vouch for her
veracity.
It is strnnge, but truth
often is more so, than fiction.”
Election on Road Bond Pro-
po s a I
Monday, November 24, has
been set «as the date for the spec­
ial election in Clackamas county
to vote upon the proposition to
bond the county in the sum o f
$1,700,000 for the purpose o f
hardsurfacinir nearly 150 miles ot
main roads and including $106,000
to he used toward the cost o f
constructing a new bridge across
the Willamette river at Oregon
City.
Thursday, October 30, 1919
T" + + - * * « ♦
>u get in in tim^ for the
SPECIAL ON PICNIC HAMS?
If you didn’ t you had better get in this week
while the getting’s good . T h e price will g o
up next week.
C O F F E E IS
G O IN G H I G H E R .
Com e in and let us protect you on a farther advance
in the price of flour.
REMEMBER OUR MOTTO
“ THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD FOR YOU.”
M e Willis & M e W ill is
GROCERS
Standard $155
Clutch $lt>5
Why the Vauphan
is Supreme.
*
A?
Because it is built for long hard honest service and
has more time, labor and repair saving features than any
drag saw made. Investigate for your self. T h e Vaughan
is the only saw with the J I F F Y S A W H O L D E R which
grips or releases saw head in instant; the only saw with
M E T A L T O M E T A L C L U T C H that cannot burn out;
the only one with the accident preventing S A F E T Y
A N G L E ; the adjustable P I T M A N H E A D , the single
unit crank case; heavy malleable sproket, etc., that gives
long life and cuts wear and repair.
W RITE US FOR MACHINE
OR INFORMATION IE YOUR DEALER HASN’T IT.
VAUGHN MOTOR WORKS, INC.,
470 E. Main St.
Portland Ore.
I
t
NOTICE TO ALL MUSIC LOVERS! i
I have just received my first shipment of
GOLDEN-THROATED C U X TO N O U S
and wish to announce that I am now ready to dem on­
strate the Quality Phonograph to all interested.
This ideal Home Phonograph makes your home complete.
The best music for the least money.
R. G. MARCHBANK
Special Club Offer on Supplement
Ì