Eastern Clackamas news. (Estacada, Or.) 1916-1928, July 05, 1917, Image 6

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    Eastern Clackamas News
Published every Thursday at
Estacada. Oregon
K. M. Stundish,
Editor and Manager
Entered at the poatoffice in Eatacada,
Oregon, as second-class mail.
One year
S u b s c r ip t i o n
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S ix m onths
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-
K atks
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$1.00
.50
Thursday, July 5, 1917
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Mr. Estaeada Property Owner
have you complied with the
provisions of the “sewer coupling
ordinance” yet?
If riot, you
may get into trouble, and ignor­
ance of the law is no excuse,
even if the advertising of said
ordinance was so arranged that
you didn’t see it on the side of a
telephone pole. Ask the Record­
er for a copy of it.
The peculiar style of walking
now done by the people of Esta­
cada, consisting of a modified
form of the fox-trot, with a long
glide and jump attached, is noth­
ing that should be laughed at,
but is caused by ihe daily prac­
tice of dodging open holes in the
city’s sidewalks and treading
lightly on the loose ends of
planks.
f
Have you had any of the out­
put or product of the Estacada
Cheesery yet?
It looks like
cheese, acts like cheese and tastes
a little better than any other
cheese you ever set your teeth in.
When it comes to responding,
this community is getting to be
the original responder, not only
in taking the lead in cash dona­
tions for the Red Cross, Y. M. C.
A., Belgian Relief and other
worthy causes, but in responding
with over 4500 pounds of milk
for the Estacada Cheesery, twen­
ty-four hours after it started
operations.
It is just such responding as
this, that assures this community
a steady, wholesome growth and
is putting the word Estacada tin
the map.
Isn't it about time a few Good
Roads Days were being staged
in this community?
As a means of “ cementing bet­
ter relations.“ (as the Live Wires
would say.) there is nothing that
will do more good than these get-
togel her and-work-together holi­
days. with tin* business man and
farmer toiling side by side, with
the promise of a tine picnic din­
ner at noon and the hopes of
building a lasting piece of good
road.
The News’ comment against
the alsdishment of smoking at
the last and former meetings of
the Farmers’ & Merchants' Club
lias naturally brought forth some
criticism from the nOn-smokers.
The News, being a “ Fire
Brand” , naturally smokes a little
and its editor, being addicted to
the nicotine habit personally, can
only see one, smoke-bedimmed
side of the question, especially
when under the influence of the
vile weed.
The history ot commercial or­
ganizations in this community
has been one of fits and starts
and if tobacco is taken away
from the meetings, there will be
several fits and many starts for
home.
The present system of semi­
monthly dinners has proven a
success and is largely responsible
for the good attendance but, as
a good smoke after a meal is al­
most a necessity to the habitual
devotee, the abolishment of the
practise is bound to keep many
good men away from the meet­
ings.
And the pity of it s that the
chronic smoker is in misery, es­
pecially after a meal, if he can­
not be allowed his regular shot
of dope. And as effective work
cannot be obtained from a man
in misery, it is better policy to
let the slaves of Dame Nicotine
get themselves well under the
influence of the narcotic before
passing the hat or asking for
their cooperation.
The prohibition at the last
meeting was, of course, inspiied
through courtesy to the ladies,
the majority of whom had tobac­
co fumed husbands or fathers
present and had a vote of those
ladies been taken, it is unlikely
that a one would have objected
to allowing the men to enjoy
their usual vice.
As effective work in the Farm­
ers’ & Merchants’ Club is de­
pendent upon the active cooper­
ation and work of as many men
as possible and as the big major­
ity are tobacco users, the prohi­
bition of this custom will end in
hurting the organization.
Youngsters Dispose O f
1 2 0 0 Sandw iches
1200 sandwiches, 10 gallons of
milk, 400 cookies. 8 big cakes,
about 100 lbs. of salad, bunches
and bunches of radishes, a box
of oranges and a bunch of bana­
nas, represents but a portion of
the cargo which was stored in
the “ tummies” of the four score
children from the Portland In­
dustrial Center, who were the
guests of the women’s organiza­
tions of this community in Esta­
cada Park last Saturday.
The affair went off as sm<x)th-
ly as a Sunday School picnic,
with the women of this commun­
ity ably assisting Mrs. W. Givens
of Estacada who was in charge
of the entertainment and dinner.
In all languages from Yiddish
to Chinese and with a smattering
of negro accent, the praises of
the good ladies of Estacada and
vicinity are this week being her-
W e Strive To Please
Ps
Our prices are kept as low’ as
cl
can be made and our service the
!
!
best we know how to give.
» > \
i ;
1 i
!})
! * >
We can get cheaper merchan­
dise
but
we
do not
sacrificing quality
but try
“ The
•
believe in
for quantity—
to live up to our motto
Best Is None To
Good
Fo r Yo u ’ *
L. A. Chapman
Estacada,
Oregon
jg
Within two weeks the ('hevrolet oars will he advanced
Buy Now or the raise will affect you
Five varieties of CHEVROLET TRUCKS
to suit any farmer or merchant needs
CASCADE
GARAG1
"The place for expert service"
S. P. Pesznecker
-
-
Estacada, O reg
W e iTWarvel Junior Vulcanizer
$1
No flame to burn your tube.
Small enough to put in your
pocket.
Large enough to
quickly and permanently
vulcanize any puncture.
Cascade G arag e
-
aided by the Portland children,
who under the supervision of
Miss Ida May DeWitt of the In­
dustrial Center, were finally got­
ten on board the cars and return­
ed to their homes in the city,
where the memories of the days
outing among the green trees,
with more than enough to eat,
will he one long remembered.
No gasoline or alcohol,
Light a match to the
chemicalized disc and
in 5 minutes you have
a permanent repair.
E stacad a, Oregon
Phil Adams of the E. H. S.
graduating class of 1917 and who
for a year or two was identified
with the News office, is planning
to enter the University of Ore­
gon, School of Journalism this
fall. Being experienced and es­
pecially adapted to the work, he
should complete the course in
record time and be ready to join
the
ranks of “ ye editors” , better
Clyde Havens of Estacada left
Sunday for Hood River, where he equipped in all ways than the
has purchased and will conduct majority of us.
a confectionery business.