The Maupin times. (Maupin, Or.) 1914-1930, August 22, 1929, Image 1

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    PIN t:
Always working for the best
interests of Maupin and all of
Southern Wasco County.
Publishes only that news fit
to print. Caters to no particular
class, but works for alL
Vis'
VOLUME XV
MAUPIN, OREGON, THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, VJ'B
Number 42
tn fT A if If
MES
A WEEK FROM TODAY
THE BIG FAIR OPENS
ii
Calls for Prtmiuin Lit Many
piipUyt being Arranged
by Eahibitori
ind
Calls for copies of the l!'2!t Was
co County Fair r-niium lists have
been many, this office having given
out nearly 60 no fHr. Nearly nil of
those who have asked for lists have
signified an intention of arranging
exhibtls mitl thsc range from u lace
handkerchief to a flock of faitck cut
tle. Perhaps the bent exhibit of 4-11
club member will be at the rowing
fair. More calves, sheep, mil, pigs,
chicken, vegetable.!, cooked foods,
needlerk and other things taken
up by tho clubs will be on exhibition
than ever before shown. Kach mem
ber seems to he Imbued with tht
idea that he or she mint ttcud their
best. In the matter of live stock
many youngster have had their en
tries on special diet and have been
giving special care that their animals
appear at their bent.
The race program, whit h will be
the same as made for the fairs at
Condon, Morn and (iohlrndnlc, has
already resulted In having a large
string of fa t horse brought to our
fair ground and II gallopers are
expected to arrive next Monday,
they coming from member towns of
the Racing association. Besides the
horses from other parts many local
race horse owner, already have their
horsca at the grounds, among them
being Wallace Couley, who has sev
eral new additions to his string,
which contain "Shimmy," a saddler,
"Centaur," "Lghi Foot Molly," Um
ber Jim" and "Dan Patch," runnYr.
a well "Brick," "Copper" and
"Dan" a relay string. Wallace says
he is going after 4he money In each
race and has the hrses that will
bring it to him,
A circus ha , been signed to show
at the fair, it being the aggrvralion
billed to i how at T gh Valley In op
position to the fair program. That
it will show at the fair grounds
mean that more people will attend
there than if tho show "bucked" the
county exposition. Many other
novelties in the way of free outside
acts, games, merry-go-round, Ferris
wheel and other attraction provided
for the pie ure of all ages.
Many stock owners are preparing
fancy animal for the fair. Some
of the best dairy cattle, beef rattle,
blooded hogn and sheep, poultry and
horses will occupy stalls nl the
grounds and the parade of su-r. will
be the be t ever held at Tygh Val
ley fair.
As the fair is a county afi'nir,
many people being stockholders ir
the association, it Is up to our p"o
pie generally to turn out and mnk
th exposition the best of all. It
is. by paid admi sions that pre
mium arc provided for, to keep up
the grounds, make addition to
building, improve the track and take
care of the many things that require
money to carry on. F.ach f.incher
of this section should make nrange
mcnts to attend the fair all three
days and to bring their families with
them. The more admissions there
are tho bettor able the association
will be to give money for premiums
and to provide more, attractions for
. the pleasure of tho attendants.
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, August
20-80-31, are the dates you are ex
pected to he at tho fair.
St. Helens
started here.
-Sash and door factory
HONEY
1 f CHAW, in SURE. ,
HOMEY-LOU MEETS A CHflRrllNS GENTLEMAN
WHO CALLS HIMSELF SlR.CUTHBERT.
COMMENDS THE MAUPIN TIME3
Maupin
Rrcffiving Eacallent Value
In Local Publication
In a letter to The Time from
E. (J. Harlan, editor of ''Oregon
Puiinrsa," the writer takes occa ion
to e.m.i.iend this piper, syii if thai
Mu in Is ge'.'. f excellent . value
for its investment in this publica
tion. Mr. Harlan's letter, in prt,
follows;
"Dear Mr. Semmes!
"We appreciate receiving your
n vi paper and arsure you we nhall
use it with people Interested in
your (ornlity,
"The writer recalls his pleasant
visit to your town on the occosiun
of the bridge dedication.
"We want to commend you on the
fine newspaper you ar" giving the
nenpl of your end of the county
tnd we trust your reader and ad
versers will (how their apprecia
tion in a very ointimiinl munner.
A good, live newspaper in one of
?b" best development aifeneles in
any district and with the support
.-on are receiving, Maupin I getting
"xcellcnt value for it investment
ii your publication."
O. T. REDUCES RAIL FARES
Takei
Effect Nasi Sunday
Continue, Two Month,
and
The Oregon Trunk railway an
nouuees a substantial reduction in
the round trip fares between Ore
gon Trunk railway station Bend to
Wishram inclusive and Portland, ef
fective daily, from Sunday, August
25th to November 30th, with a re
turn limit of ,10 days. These reduc
tions will apply also from, and to
Prineville and between Oregon Trunk
local point .
According to I.ec S. Davis, tra
veling passenger agent of the Ore
gon, trunk railway, these reduc
tions arc being put on a an experi
ment, in the belief that they will
prove attractive to traveler at
Central Oregon points, Portland,
pic',, as they afford opportunity for
making rounds trips at much lower
ihKii regular charges.
The new reduced round trip
fares from Maupin are a: follows
with proportionate reductions to
points not listed. Portland, $!M5;
Vcneouver, f'.MR, Camas. $!M5;
Washougal, $!).l.r; Stevenson,
t7.H5; Rend, fi.10; Kedmond,
$5.10; Prineville, $7.10; Midras,
?:i.0; Culver, $4.1 5 ; Metolius,
:t.!i5.
The Oregon Trunk train leaves
Maupin for Portland at 1:10 a. m.
nnd for Bend at 2:33 a. m. daily.
FORDS STILL MORE FORDS
Kramer Bros. Flooding Country
With New Creation
We don't know how they do it
without newspaper advertising but
the fact remains that that firm Is
filling ths section with the latest
creation of Henry Ford. La t week
Kramer Bros, delivered a Ford
truck to the Farghera, a roadster
to Chas, Mclntyrc of the Wapinitia
road crew, a coupe to Mary Ann
MeDougall and a like vchiclo to
Chester McCorkle, the latter living
nt The Dalles. Had Kramer Bros,
used the columns of The Times to
tell about their cars no doubt sale
would have been greatly augmented
ni a result.
LOU IN YOSEMTTE x&sx
BOYCOTTED
IDLE AT
COUNTY SEAT
Will Rasp Harratt After Frolic
and Whiakar Crop Picktd
Up in BikU
The fifth annual American Le
gion Old Fort Dalles Frolics will be
pro euted in Tht Dalle on Thursday,
Friday and Saturday, September
6, 6, and 7, and according to the
general committee in uharge of
events, will be "bigger and better
than ever."
Iegionaire and other at Th
Dalles are now raising their annual
crop of whisker in preparation for
the whisker contest n September
7, when prize totalling $50 will be
awarded for the best specimen of
bir. ute adornment. Anyone wear
ing whisker (genuine, not Imitation
or fusia:) wll be admitted free to the
Frolic thia year, it is announced.
The Frolic annual pageant
pantile, which has grown each year
until it now include 75 entries,
presenting every form of transpor
tation known to mankind, will be
given at 5 p. m.' on Thursday,
September B. Door to Old Fort
Dalle, (The Dalles civic auditor
ium) will open Immediately follow
ing the parade, and the first show
ing of the Fall Fashion Revue and
Vaudeville will be given at 7:15 p.
m. A second show a rendition of
the first will be given at 8:30 p.
This annual Fashion Revue is one
looked forward to by many resi
dents, of the Mid-Columbia district,
and ir, participated in by 24 bcauti
ful young women of The Duller,
rt prcsentng The Dalle merchant.
Dancing, Ringing and comely num
ber will enlivei the revujyit s, de
clared. '
A 30-round boxng card will be
given at the Frolic Friday evening,
September 6. The card will include
10 round bout between Terry
Kileen of Eugene and Rocky Rod
ger of Hood River, at 160 pounds,
a semt-windup of six round bctleen
Billy Irwin, "The Umatilla Buzs
aw," and "Chick" Kennedy, of
Medfnrd, a fix round special event
between Darrell McQuillan, of Was
co and Russell Wright, of Heppner,
nt 147 pounds, and four , rounds
between Harry McDonald, of Moro
and Bob Collins, of The Dalles. A
four round curtain raiser will be of.;
fered, "Cobb" George, of The Dalles
vs, Johnny Maenah, of
Wasco, at
160 pounds.
Those attending the fight will be
admitted to the Frolics games, con
cessions, .entertainments and danc
ing on Friday night without the
usual season ticket, it was stated.
On Saturday night, continuous
vaudeville will be presented in the
auditorium theatre, and the enter
tainment features of the Old Fort
will be in full swing in the audtor
ium gymna ium,
Dancing will be enjoyed nightly
in the auditorium ballroom, where
one of the finest spring floors in
central Oregon is available, with a
capacity of 300 couples.
Costumes of Old Fort Dalles
days, 1848 to 1870, will be worn by
Dalles residents during the three
day- of the Frolics, and the city
and county government will be tem
porarily displaced by especially
elected civic officials, it s declared.
French plate looking glasses,
$1.25, $1.50 and $1.75 at the Mau
pin Drug Store.
AH. HEflH, . ) mm 3?
TAKE THE &LflW5E$. fJ
li . i 6 yw sircuthbert; Si n..
n& JWHy SHOULD HE
H iO r V 11 INTERESTED
ll rHs & oW, HONEY-LOU? I
BOY SCOOTS ENJOY
10-DAY OUTING AT
MOUNTAIN LAKE
Sunday Services and Inspection
Order of tho Day Boat Race
and Treatura Hunt
There were a large number of vis
itors at the first Sunday in the
Bo Scout camp at Lost Lake, sev-
eral being early enough to attend
the Sunday services of the scouts,
which were in charge of Rev. W.
T. Beatty of White Salmon and
Rev. F. W. " Delaphine of Hood
River, and greatly enjoyed by all
pmcnt.
Then ia paction was the order of
the day, and was quite a matter of
serious inspection, as all the tents
were in splendid shape.
Many of the visitors brought
their lunch and several had notified
the cook and bought tVir dinners
there. A committee of the Lion.
Club of The Dalle brought five
gallons of ice cre-ini, which tlr:
scouts enjoyed very much. There
also were several nice treats of
peanuts, niarhallows, cantaloupes,
peaches, etc., brought for the boy
to' enjoy later, which means much
to a boy in, camp.
Court of Honor at 2:00 a. m. was
wonderful and showed some of the
work the scouts had been doing in
camp. Then came a boat race in
the large whale boats of the camp,
which was quite an exciting event
and enjoyed very much, as it was
declared a tie. Then a treasure
hunt, which proved quite a hunt,
but the trea ure was eventually
found, and being candy and gum
was, of course, quite a treasure to
the group which made the find.
There was scheduled contests in
brwimjning and; diving, but, , .the
afternoon proved too cold for the
sport. The wind and rain cleared
away at sundown and a wonderful
campfire ended the day in camp.
Scout Ralph Kaiser, and Her
best Kramer, from Maupin, attended
the camp.
WATER COMING DOWN TO FLAT:
.
Pond. Being Filled and WelU Get
Supply of Wetnen
Ranchers of Juniper were begin-
ning to worrk about their domestic
and stock water supply, as
necessity had bogun to be
rcarce, Tuesday hist, however, their
fears were dispelled by a plentiful
supply of water being delivered
through the ditches und canals.
Ponds and wells on the upper Flat
have received an unusuall rupply
of water, and from now on there will
he a sufficiency for all purposes,
aside from irrigation of alfalfa
field:.
WILL SERVE CHICKEN DINNERS
Wapinitia Ladies Aid to Hive Stand
at Coming Fair
The Wapinitia Ladies Aid of the
U. B. church has secured the "Dew
Drtp Inn" at the fair grounds and
each day of the fair will serve
chicken dinners. Of course there
will be many other things to accom
pany the cooked biddies, and all who
feel the pangs of hunger while at
the fair may have same a swaged
by putting their feet umbr the
tables at the Inn.
Burns Hudson street to be
proved.
Hflir DOME IN Y0SEMITE. NATIONAL
THE SCENIC .SPOTS OF -THE WORLD.
VISITED fcY 495P00 PE0PL.E EACH
EXCELLENT ALL YE. ft ROAftS. t t u
MAUPIN TEACHER ON
TRIP TO ARCTIC CIRCLE
MAUPIN CIRL AT UNIVERSITY
Doria Bonney Taking Summer
Count to Qualify aa Teacher
University of Oregon, Eugene,
August 21 (Special) The target
post-its.ion cummer school in the
historv of the Univpraitv nt Drotrnn
, benf utu.nAei thfa mmmeT by
. ., -
tal enrollment ir, 316, nearly double
that of any former post-session.
The larg increase is attributed to
the "floating university" trip on the
S. S. Queen wheh took 155 students
on a two-weeks cruise of Alaska.
In addition to this, however, the
campu; enrollment of 161 students
exceeds all prevous enrollment.
16H0 students attended or are at
tending the summer sessions con
ducted in Eugene and Portland, and
the post-c.es. ions. This is an in
crease of 279 over last year's total
enrollment.
Post-session will close August 30
with commencement exereuji for
those who haa lilled graudatio.- re
quirements. This is the first time
commencement ha been held after
the summer session, ttudent ha.a
previously been held over until the
regular June commencement.
Increasing attendance and inter
est in the university summer session
promi es to keep the Eugene campus
active all the year around. The
summer and post-session virtually
compose a fourth quarter.
ANTELOPE'S OIL EXCITMENT
Artesian Well Drill Eaters Oil Shale
tnd Will Co Deeper
. Great exciment prevailed at Ante
lope one day last week when evi
dences of oil were found in a well
being sunk for artesian water at the
baseball grounds. The citizens of
that place had subscribed a sum for
drilling to a depth of 200 feet Just
before the end of that distance had
i i j ii j -ii . . ,
, uccn rcui:iieu me ami entered a
shale which bore evidences of con-
j taining oil. The shale was tried by
fire, which burned brightly. Samples
'were sent away for analysis and a
I further sum has been subscribed to
pay for drilling an additional 200
t
, feet. In the meantime residents of
that Antelope are anxiouiy awaiting
rnt!inr:word from tb snmnloa cnt t ia
(laboratory.
WILL SHOW AT TYGH VALLEY
New Stories and Other Film
lure Booked
Fe-
Being unable to make connection
with the manager of the Wasco coun
ty Fair regarding putting on shows
during the fair, George Miller has
rented the I. O. O. F. hall at Tygh
Valley and on Friday and Saturday
nights, August 30-31 will show there.
George has secured some special
film tories and with them will be
shown the very latest news happen
ings as well as acceptable comedies.
Watch for bills containing program.
joy the cozy comfort of a steamer
voyage with dining menus contain
ing variety to satify any ordinary
.appetite : and stop frequently, this
preventing the monotony of a trans
ocean voyage and allow use of little
used muscles.
I shall soon be back to old friends
and familiar face so, au revoir.
LUCILE CANTRELL.
Y'KNOW, THflTS
HALF DOME.
PflFK - ONE OF
y EAR, OVER
tiwMX.fa
HONEY UOU v Sj&" HJI (
Lueile Cantrell Writes Tha
Timet of Voyage to the
Land of Cold
Below we publish a letter from
Mrs. Lucile Cantrell, now on a trip
to Alaska a a member of the sum
mer school contigent from Corvailis
and Eugene schools of higher edu
cation. Mrs. Cantrell seems to be
entranced with the scenery on the
trip and tell of her experience; in
a plcasureable manner:
August 14, 1929.
On Board the S. S. Queen
Thru the home paper I wish to
send word to n-y friends in Maupin
and ucinity that I am now on my
long anticipated Alaskan trip. We
left Seattle August 8th, and all too
soon will be back in the states a
week from today. We are now
southward bound but stopping to
load salmon from an up-to-date
cannery at Hood Bay before going
to Sitka. We will return via
Juneau, where the Juneau Alaska
mining works are overhead. I say
overhead, advisedly, because we
climbed about seven hundred step
almost vertically to reach the top
of the building on the hill over
hanging the town. The tunnels run
back into the hills two and one-
half miles and are still 250 feet be
low the turface. The mining is
done by the gravity system, with
huge revolving tanks containing
steel balls t0 crush the. ore.
Yesterday we were in Skaguay,
that famous place enroute to the
gold fields of Dawson. From there
we went inland on a narow guage
railroad, wheh . clmbs over White
Pass to lake Bennett and on. We .
went no farther than the lake,
where the few dteletons of Bhacka
remain as mute testimony of the
once gold-crazed population of
15,000, housed mostly in tents.
There is only a lunch station there
now. Skaguay, too, make one
think of a cemetery, when you see
the old vacant buildings and make
a guess at the probable excitement
of earlier days when the popula
tion exceeded 20,000.. In Skaguay
I saw the most beautiful flowers to
be found anywhere in the world.
The owner of the gardens under
stands his business for the richly
colored dahlias now in bloom were
truly as big as a dinner plate, and
the length of my indsx finger ju t
measured a nansv blossom. Fnfn
are expected at any time and then
only the hot house plants will sur
vive. The old trail may still be seen
along the sides of mountains of"
granite and overhanging a ragiugr
torrent I should have liked to go'
to Dawson to see White Horse rapids
where the first gold seekers met
their Waterloo, but if financially
secure I'd like to spend the summer
in Ala ka so we'll forget the if.
Last evening we heard Bishop
Rowe of the Episcopal church, who
having come into the territory be
fore '98, visited missions along the
Yukon and inside the arctic Circle
with dog teams. His recent trip
to his northern mi sion was by air
plane. You would never tire of
hearing thia man stalwardt physi
cally, mentally and morally, who
has met all th vicissitudes of life
in Alaska, has a sense of humor and
unbounded faith in the people, Es
komo, Indians and whites.
We are skirting a small part of
southern Alaska, sail no rough
seas, pass beautiful secenry and en-
K1XT WEEK Ar
GRAND CANYON
1 5H0W.D THINK fl
COMTHir AS RICH AS
THIS C0UUD AFFORD
WHOLE ONE.
Mr.