The Maupin times. (Maupin, Or.) 1914-1930, September 09, 1926, Image 2

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    ON THE SESQU1 LAGOONS
5.4
You Can't
Laugh This Off
It has been figured out that if the sum of $1.00 had
been deposited in a saving bank at 0 per cent on
the day of Chrisfa birth, tho interest on it up to
the present day would pay off all of tho nationnl
debts of all of the nations in tho world.
And interest piles up just as fast today as it had
at any time in the history of the civilized world.
Did You Know
that the only reason more people are not Having U
because they have not learned how fast interest on
money mounts up? Why not start on the one road
that leads to Comfort and Happiness- the Thrift
Road? .
Our time is yours if you will ask for it Drop in
and let's talk over the benefit of a saving ac
countA dollar'will start one.
MAUPIN STATE BANK
- (INCORPORATED)
iUTLE
MAUPIN'S LEADING
Grocery and
Meat Market
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The Maupia Times
Published every Thursday at
Maupin, Oregon
C. W. Semtnes, Editor
C W. Semmei and E. R. Simon
i
Publisher
Subscription: One year, $1.50; six
months, 75 cents; three months, 50c
Entered as second class mail mat
ter September 2, 1914, at the post
office at Manpin, Oregon, under
lha Act of March 3, 1879.
BACK TO BOOKS
The sound of the school
once more heard around
bell is
Maupin,
end while it doesn't come as sweet as j
music to the ears of every boy and
girl, we believe it finds more of them .
tnxious to get back to their studies
than was the case with youngsters
ot the older generation. That may
be accounted for from the fact that
thay have brighter and more com
fortable schoolrooms, or more con
venient ways of getting to school.
Or it may be .that text-books are not tfae comraencement of Khool The
as dry as they used to be and that i building b large enough to ac
new methods of teaching are more commodate all the pupiis of the sec
interesting. , tion ia whicn it jg iocated and makes
These help some to take the sting ' fine appearance in its coat of white
out oi scnooi routine, oi cuunse. out
we candidly believe the pesent gen
eration of young people realizes
the serious side of life more fully
than did the older generation when
it was in school. Today's boys find
girls know that the greatest handi
cap that can befall one is the lack of
education; they know that the better
they employ their hours in the
schoolroom the greater" will be their
opportunity for enjoying the com
forts and even the luxuries of life
hen they have finished their studies
and out in a world, where everyone 'in our school. In answer Mr. Eugene
must fight his own battles and where j Ferguson showed up and was engag
the fighting gets harder and harder Jed for the position. Mr. Ferguson
every year.
At "any rate school days are here
once more and every word of en
encouragement you can speak to the
youngsters as they pass, books in
hand, will help to lighten that which
they consider a heavy load. They
are doing their part in getting ready
to carry on when you have finished.
Show tham you have confidence in
their ability to do a good job of it by
cheering them on their way with a
smile and a kind word or two. z
THE BEST LOSERS
They give the farmer credit
f or 1
being the world's champion corn
plainer and yet he isn't entitled to
that reputation. A farmer will com
piain when a hot spell wilts his corn
or when a hailstorm beats down his
wheat, but a city citic makes more
noise when the same sun wilts down
his collar and the same hailstorm
interferes with the ball game. A
farmer may get discouraged at crop
failures and low prices but there are
more farmers who can crack jokes
over their luck than there are city
men can get a chuckle ont of a real
estate slump or a dull merchandis
ing season. Somebody has pictured
the farmer as a "chronic corn
plainer" when the fact of the busi
ness is he is a far better loser than
the city chap. And if you think
he isn't just stand around and
listen to the city man squawk when
the weather isn't just exactly what
he would have it if he had the job of
making it.
Maybe if Mapin men took as good
care of their complexions as women
do nature would give them better
looking faces to work on.
Uucle Sam's figures show that
each American should have $i2.01
but some of us miss this amount Dy
several hundred dollars.
. , Henry Ford . is now building air
planes. When it comes n trans
portation the sky is the limit with
him.
''Lome men live to a ripe old age
and others go out hunting and pull j
the" Jun through a feiice. ' ;
I Rubber aprons 69 cents
' the Maupin Drug Store.
each at
Stockholder Attend Meeting
j Among the stockholders interested
i in the Maupin State Bank who at
tended the meeting Tuesday were,
ij. S. Brown, I C. Henneghan, L. D.
Woodside, W. E. Hunt, L. S. Stovall,
! F. S. and J R. Fleming and F. D.
! Stuart
AsiUtiiif at Rainbow
Mrs. John Donaldson is assisting
in the kitchen at the Rainbow cafe,
relieving Mrs. B. F. Turner, who will
take a half day off for a time.
'Off to Institute
ir..,H:. ..V. w
loaded them-
selves into a stage Tuesday morning
an(j went to The Dalles, where they
attended the county Teachers' insti-
tute that day and Wednesday.
School opens today with a full corps
of teachers on hand.
School House Complete
The new school building in Wap
initia district has been completed by
Cnntarinr Wilhelm and is ready for
paint
; Odd Lot of Sheep Sold
i While in this neighborhood Jim
Mace purchased several odd lota of
sheep. He got about 20 from Al
Brittain and Elza Derthick turned off
about 35 of his pet woolies.
Will Teach and Coach
An S. 0. S. call as sent out the
latter part of last week for a teach-
!er for the Seventh and Eighth grades
will teach the grades mentioned and
also act as coach for the athletic
squads of the school. With his as
sistance there is no reason why Mau
pin schools should not make a better
showing in track meets than they
have done in several late years.
Building New Residence
Dave Donaldson has his new resi
dence, on the East side, practically
completed. Some conjecture as to
his ultimate intentions is rampant,
but none has so far been made to the
effect that single blessedness is be
gining to pall on our champion fish-
erman.
Will Open Pool Hall.
Earl Burchard, who has been con
ducting a soft drink and ice cream
stand on the Mt. Hood Loop high
way the past season, has rented the
John Lewis building at Wapinitia
and will conduct a pool hall therein.
He will also handle soft drinks, ice
cream and have card tables.
D)ORTLAMD
ikfe
305 SECOND STREET
Over Pound's Jewelry Store, The Dalles
Oregon, will mak you
A Full Set of Teeth
fully guaranteed to fit and give satisfaction
for $40.00
Bridge Work $9.00 per Tooth
Painless Extraction $00
W. T. Slatten, D. D. S.
Proprietor
f
is?
L fofl 1
Here are Americans, rlsltors to tha Sesqul Centennial International Expo
sition In Philadelphia which celebrates the 150th anniversary of the signing ot
the Declaration ot Independence, riding about the lagoons In an Italian craft,
a gondola, from which they rlew tho buildings and displays from many lands.
In the distance can be seen. the mammoth Scsqul stadium; to the right ti
the signal tower ot the United States Coast Guard building and exhibit, and
to the left is one ot the Japanese pagodas which dot the exposition grounds.
The Grecian pavilion Is one ot the permanent structures on the site before
the city government decided to build the Sesqut al the front door of the great
Philadelphia Navy Yard. The Exposition continues until December 1.
More Deer Hunter. j first to eighth grades, will be taught
W. H. Staats, W. II. Williams and taught.
Grover Slusher left today for the
Cascades, where each will try and
bag a deer. Wiliams took a gun
along to shoot his with
Measured City Spring.
T. Leland Brown, county water
master, took the measurement of the
flow from the city springs Wednes
day. The measure was taken at the
foot of the rams and showed a flow
of 3.8 second feet The springs
were measured in 1923 and the flow
at that time was about the same as
now. This shows that about the
same amount of water flows from
the springs at all times.
Sold Many Articles.
The booth conducted by the
Ladies Aid of the local U. B. church
at the fair was very well patronized,
goods to the amount of $26 having
been disposed of.
Will Attend Uuivertity.
Miss Winifred Kaiser is preparing
to attend the state university at
Eugene this school year. She will
leave for the big Willamette Valley
town the latter part of next week.
Camper at Olallia Lake.
Many have camped at Olallie
Lake the pas t week. Some very
good cacthes of eastern brook trout
have been made, as the heads left on
the ground near the lake testify.
Make your start to school a pleas
ant one by getting the right kind oi
supplies at the Maupin Drug Store.
Pine Grove School to Open.
The Pine Grove school will begin
its sessions on Monday next, Miss
Overman will again sc;vo as tea3her.
The school will have r.n enrollment
of 25 and al' courses, fram the
I'D
sib
Killing Native G route.
It is reported that hunters are at
I work near Coyote Butte and on the
; Flat killing native grouse and
! Chinese pheasants. Of course the
season is not open, but to some peo
ple there is no such thing as an open
or closed season on game, and the
hunters spoken of are of that class.
Another Deer Hunting Party.
Bates Shattcuk, Joe Kramer,
Johnnie Williams and E. E. Selert
composed a party who left for Wolf
Creek after deet "his morning.
Their grounds lie fn the Blue
Mountains. Mr. Slcret is a brother
in law of Bates and hails from
Vancouver, Washinton.
Return to Mulioo Home.
J. J. Mallatt, father of George
Mallatt of the Bakeoven district
and who has been visiting with his
son and family for some time, has
deft for his home at Mulino, Oregon.
The elder gentleman is a civil war
veteran, he being one of the young
est in the United States of record.
Fertiliting Wheat. .
We have received an interesting
article on wheat fertilization from
jF. M. Gill of Dufur, which will be
published next week. Mr. Gill says
!he has applied the fertilizer him
'self and knows, from experience,
just what beneficial effect it has on
growing grain. Watch for it,
ranchers.
Card of Thank
The Ladies Aid wibhes to thsnk
the fair board of the Southern Was-
Co County Fair for the booth nt the
Tygh
Valley Fair.
Mrs. Lester Kelly, Pres.
Mrs. Everett Richmond, Sec.
For Sale.
Vaughn woodsaw, light weight.
Has cut but 35 cords of wood. May
be seen nt Richmond's Service sta
tion. $65.00 takes it. 44-t2
For Sale.
One hundred and fifty-seven ewes
and 127 lambs. E. H. Ashley,
43-t2 Tygh Valley, Oregon.
AUTOMOBILE
and General Machine Work
Cylinder Grinding,' General Machine Work, Truing
Crankshafts, Making Pistons and Rings,
Bearings, All Sizes Made to Order.
Sheet Metal Workers.
Complete Line of Parts for All Makes of Cars
Full Line of Lahcrs Springs
ELECTRIC and OX Y-ACET YLEN E WELDDING
Iff EAD . Q ALLOWAY
609 East Second Street
Phone 400
Dance Dates
Legion Hall
SEPT. 25 HARVEST BALL
OCT. 9 OLD TIME DANCE
OCT. 30 HALLOWE'EN MASK
NOV. 13 REGULAR DANCE
NOVEMBER 23
ING DANCE
THANKSGIV.
DEC. 11 REGULAR DANCE
DEC. 25 CHRISTMAS DANCE
DECEMBER 31
JANUARY 15-
JANUARY 29
FEBRUARY 12 MASK BALL
FEBRUARY 26
MARCH
DANCE
17 ST. PATRICK'S
MARCH 31
Make your
trip Bast
Your lat oppor-
tunity to go Cast
on low round trip
excursion fares
exDircs Saturday,
September 18. Final re
turn limit October 31.
Liberal stopovers. Agent
will tell you exact fare
from your city and help
map out your itinerary.
PACIFIC
FOR INFORMATION AND CIESEAVA'
TION CALL OH OH WIMT2
R. B. Bell, Agent, Maupin, Oregon
Edw. H. McAlicn,
T. F. die P. A., Bend, Oregon.
THE DALLES, ORE.
, .Phone. 383 J
1
FOR SALE
Pine and fir wood In the log at
25 cenU per cord, by the Forest Ser
vice. Logs now being piled by clear
ing crew on tho Wapinitia cut-off
road cunt of Hear Springs. AU you
want for you rown use up to 80
cord. Wood ran In resold,
Joe A. Graham,
Forest Ranger
42-12 Wainitia, Oregon
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION"
Department of The Interior
U. S. Land Office at The Dalles,
Oregon. August 19, 1028.
Notice U hereby given that
Alfred T. Herrliag
of Bend, Oregon, who, on January
S, VJ'22, made Homestead Entry,
under Act Dec. 29, 1918, No. 022,
760, for Lot 4 SEK SWK, W'i SK
'4, See. 31. T. 7 S., R.18 E., Lota
2 3. 8, and SEU SW, Ste. 6. T.
8 S., K. 15 E Willamette Meridian,
has filed notice of intention to
make final three year proof, to
extablish claim to the land above
described, before F. D. Stuart,
I'nitcd States Commissioner, at
Maupin, Oregon, on the 2nd day of
October, 1926.
Claimant names as witnesses:
r. J. Kirsch, Otto Herrling, D. B.
Appling, C. A. Duus, all of Maupin,
Oregon. ,
J. W, Donnolly, Register
a-28 a-23
Your Watch Haywire?
If it is not doing its work
brinj? it to The Times office
and Mr. Semmes will send
it to
GUY A. POUND
Manufacturing Jeweler
and Watchmaker
Successor to D. Lindquist
THIC DALLES - Oltl GON
Dr. F. V. Sauvee
Optomctrst & Optician
Successor To
Dr. Geo. A. Cutting
305 Court St. The Italics Ore.
Portland Office
SfOG-8 Swetland Building
I Fisher's
Garage
(East end of Bridge)
Gasolene
Oils, Tires,
Accessories
Lunch
Goods always on hand
for, convenience of
Tourists
i
)
I
i
i
i
i
( Rp.nnirs
Good work, lowest cost