Independence enterprise. (Independence, Or.) 1908-1969, December 15, 1922, Page PAGE SIX, Image 6

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    Friday, December in, 1922
INDEPENDENCE ENTERPRISE
Pajre Six
CARPENTER TELLS
OF YEARNS WORK
County Agent Shows There
Are Many Demands
Upon His Services
In sumarixing the work of the
county agent for 1922 and in a state
ment ass to future conditions, Paul
Carpenter says:
Polk primarily is an agricultural
county. While no inconsiderable in
come is derived from lumber and sev
eral other industries, yet this is and
always will be a section chiefly de-'
pendent on the land for its income.
Farm welfare is followed by busi
ness prosperity. Interests of the bus
iness people of Dallas, Monmouth,
Independence and other points are
identical with those of the folks on
the farms and orchards.
The agricultural income for 1922
is running about:
For fruits - 51.200,000
Grains - 1,000,000
Hay and forage 400,000
Potatoes and other vege
tables - 75,000
Dairy products 500,000
Poultry products 175,000
Other items including hops, wool
and mohair, hojrs. beef stock, sheep!
and goats, account for a large sum. I
Let us take each of these main in-
come producers and consider their j
problems, how the county agent has j
touched them, and what improvement )
may be expected in the future. !
But a part of the agricultural ex-.
tension work is mentioned oeiow
just a number of the outstanding ,
features. Much time necessarily j
goes to office consultations, farm
calls and other activities that may not
fce grouped under the headings below. '
No county agent alone will get
very far in farm improvement. There
must be the hearty cooperation of
many agencies, of local people, com
munity leaders, farm and other or
ganizations, the business people, and
the extension service specialists who
worked in Polk county a total of 291
days in 1922. It is safe, however,
to state that but little of the work
outlined below would have been
brought to completion without an
fcger.t on the job.
In the planting, care and training
of the fruit trees we have all degrees
rr success. Some prune orchards,
for instance, are making returns at
7 years, others not until they are 10
r older. Many mature properties
are not yielding satisfactorily. This
condition arises from difference in
care, cultivation, fertilizing and prun
ning. j
The control of fruit pests, espec
ially with apples and pears, has be- j
come of first importance. Codling!
moth and scab are always present.
Other diseases and insects calling for
regular attention are anthracnose
of apples and cane fruits, mildew,
aphis, curl leaf and blight of peaches,
twig miner and bud moth with prunes.
A most dangerous condition pre
vailing in many orchards is the all
but complete stoppage of wood
growth at from 12 to 15 years. Trees
seem to stand still in development,
bear indifferently and take on the ap
pearance of age. The condition is
due to depleted soils. Trees must be
fed just as truly as animals and we
may not expect even the best ot soils
to produce trees and fruit indefinitely
without something going back on the
land. '
Prune drying has its problems with
the tonnage always crowding the
capacity of the dryer houses.
What is being done relative to
fruits?
In 1922 6 pruning demonstrations
were conducted with an attendance
of 130 growers. Pruning practice
was modified on no less than 1800
,-cres of trees as a result.
Two schools on the control of the
pests were held, reaching 81 growers.
The entire program of spraying for
the year was taken up step and step
so the men might go home, prepare
and apply sprays with effect.
Throughout the season the fruit
people were sent a circular letter
just before the time to put on each
spray, 9 letters being issued and 3,600
copies mailed. This service was ap
preciated especially by the apple,
pear and peach growers as each spray
on these fruits must be timed care
fully to do the work well.
Four demonstrations right out in
the orchards were made on the proper
thinning of apples, 58 growers taking
part. Eighteen apple orchards with
an acreage of 211 were faithfully
thinned later with a sharp increase
in the size of the fruit and its value.
Four carefully checked demonstra
tions were conducted with cover
crops in orchards. These promise to
change materially our practices rela
tive to kinds of cover crops and
methods of stimulating heavy growth.
One hundred fifty-two growers
were given individual help in orchard
difficulties, principally with insects
and diseases.
We' have 175 prune dryers, no two
alike. They have all the peculiari
ties and ills on the calendar.
On request of operators 19 dryers
were gone over thoroughly during the
drying season, improvements in the
operation worked out for 1G. When
the green prunes are pouring in and
the dryer "acts up" some one is los
ing money and losing it fast This
work was featured by close check on
the temperature and speed of air
travel in the tunnels. t
Commercial potato growing in the
Willamette valley is doomed unless I
control is secured of several destrutf-j
tive potato diseases. JMany fields j
have gone down completely this n,d (
in other years from disease alone and
virtually all fields are affected by
wilt and other infection. The mul
titude of types and varieties, too, have
a bearing ori the market returns.
Certification, involving three field
inspections a season, is a most practi
cable method not only in isolating and
saving for seed the better lots of
potatoes, but for giving the growers .
needed information on disease con
dition and potato types . A field
entered for certification becomes the
meeting place at inspection and other
times of all interested growers in the
neighborhood.
In 1922 11 growers entered for cer
tification 23 fields with a total of
52 acres. While most fields could
not qualify for certification, every
owner and his neighbors became
thoroughly familiar with disease
control methods.
There are 6.000 milking cows in
Poik county. Considerably less than
1,000 are purebred. Dairying is one
of the major sources of the farm in
come. Four of the 8 class records
of the Jersey breed are held in this
county, yet the average production
per cow the territory over is not high.
During the year just closing, 4
dairy farms have been used as meet
ing points and 10 gatherings held on
feeding, breeding and herd manage
ment, reaching 167 dairymen. The
average production can be doubled
by feed alone.
As the first step in the eradication
of tuberculosis passage of the com
pulsory test law was steered through
the 1921 session of the legislature
by the farm bureau dairy committee.
In July and August, 1921, over 1900
head were tested for tuberculosis in
order to acquaint breeders with the
importance and method of doing the
work. Thirty-one reactors were
found. Dr. H. D. Peterson went on
as county veterinarian Feb. 1st of
this year and by Dec. 3lst will have
made the first complete test of Polk
county milk cattle. This will be a
tuberculosis-free cattle county inside
of 3 years.
$5,225 represents the value of
cattle moved by the breeders with the
assistance of the agent in 1922.
The poultry industry has just gone
through a year of low values, but the
the 100,000 hens of the county
are a factor in the farm income and
a revenue producer affecting nearly
every farm home.
Three demonstration plants were
arranged to keep cost and production
records for the year and to use ap
proved methods of management.
Seventeen meetings were held at
these points, featuring feeding for
eggs, hatching, brooding and culling;
total attendance, 319. This work was
well received in every section and
drew poultrymen for long distances.
The aim is to reach different commu
nities each year with the demonstra
tion farms and eventually to cover
the county.
Proper feed and regular care can
double the average production of Polk
county fowls.
There are 49 varieties of wheat
grown in the Willamette valley, all
represented in Polk. The result is
that the total yield from our 30,000
acres of wheat not only is lower than
the proper kinds will make, but the
wide mixtures of varieties are penal
ized in grade when offered on the
market. Six varieties would cover
all the needs and well selected, sharp
ly increase the yields. To a lesser
extent these facts apply to our 25,000
acres of oats.
For 3 years grain certification has
been featured and certified stocks of
4,250 bushels are available for seed
purposes for 1923.
Two demonstrations on the survey,
location and laying of tile were made
during the year, the entire project
being completed in each case, acreage
42. A careful survey of 2 swamped
districts has been made, ownership
maps worked out and preliminary
work done on 2 drainage districts run
ning into 2,500 acers.
Copper carbonate promises to sim
plify the treatment of grains for
smut, minimize the seed killing and
get fully as good control as the older
practices. This method has been in
troduced and will be watched closely.
In 3 years 8,770 pounds of poisoned
grain has been prepared by the agent
and distributed at cost to 982 farmers.
In many sections the grey digger has
been completely checked; in all others
a good start made towards bringing
him within bounds.
The annual pocket gopher tax on
this county is not less than $30,000.
Since Sept. 15th, 11,223 acres have
been utterly cleared of this pest at a
cost within 12V& cents an acre. A
conservative estimate is that 14,000
gophers have been killed in this cam
paign. Digger and gopner poisoning
alone this year have netted savings of
welt over 525,000.
Months of time of necessity go to
activities of a miscellaneous nature.
Exhibits work has been supported and
interest in fairs built up throughout
the county. The Independence Corn
Show has been mode the largest dis
play of corn and of potatoes in West
ern Oregon.
Farm women have been organized
into groups for the consideration of
home problems, arranging 16 meet
ings this year' with an attendance of
394.
The situation relative to coopera
tive marketing organizations has been
steadied materially. Much informa
tion bearing upon organization, ad
ministration, finance, methods of
handling, and sales have been brought
to grower members. Five meetings
on the markets situation were held
with an attendance of 289.
The outlook is encouraging. Far
mers are alert and ready to make
use of any assistance available. Busi
ness interests recognize the sound
ness of extension work and without
exception approve its support.
I look forward to a distinct im
provement in the quality of our fruits.
More intelligent care of trees and
soil will give us larger prunes and an
increase in acre tonnage. Apples and
pears of unsaleable and shy-bearing
varieties will be grubbed out, the
balance given faithful attention as to
pruning, pests, soil management,
packing and marketing. Control of
the cherry maggot and other insects
and diseases will be had. There now
is general demand for the bitter
care of fruit properties.
There is a strong movement to
standardize on varieties of grains ami
potatoes to do away with the mix
tures and to raise the yield. The de
mand for certified seed wheat could
not be met in Polk this year, nor will
it be met next season. Our men are
ready to face the potato disease situ
ation and, with some help, will gain
control.
Grey squirrels perhaps never will
be eradicated, but shortly will become
a negligible factor in crop losses.
In 2 years the last gopher in this
county can be cleared out.
04HMI4
ANNOUNCE THEIR THIRD ANNUAL
ilfflf
To be held in their Show Rooms
3
Friday and Saturday, Dec. 15-36
AFTERNOONS AND EVENINGS
ENCLOSED CARS will be
Featured including
OVERLAND
WILLYS-KNIGHT
OAKLAND
PAIGE
JEWETT
it
I
- MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT EVENINGS -
Vick Bros. High St. at Trade, Salem
L.r,- much more, study will be
given feeding of all stock, especially
dairy cattle and poultry. Better
feed practices alone will increase the
net returns immensely. Then will
come better breeding. The common
cow and the scrub hen can be but a
memory 10 years from now.
dixiHisal. well equipped kitchens and
other devices and convenience that
make home life agreeable are coming
fust.
Light is being thrown on "what
happens in the dark" to the bushel of
box of prunes, arid other product
in the transfer from furm to roimum-
Farm home conditions are due forjer's table. Some marketing al.UM-s
wide improvement. $50 will put will be cormuu ana ..inner m
simple water system in most homes their share in more economical dis
and farm women are going to stop tribution by improving quality f
carrying water from the well. House product and method wf pack. We
lighting bath facilities, sewage may look for a narrowing of the
"spreail in wu atttlriimimn , farms
products.
The county agent office by romriK
consent i the headquarters fur lh
iirtranixinir rnl (hi rli-tit inir him fm
developing this work. Its primary
otijeel in 10 increase me larm incm
and make the farm home a thor
oughly good place in which to liv
, That the object arc Wing uttuinc.
is attested by the work f the h'
year and the feneral approval an
supjwrt of farm people and olhn
taxpayer.
o
emis&ikloiniaB Kinross siB
CONTINUKS
Your Xmas
at a Saving
i
WITH ONLY SEVEN DAYS REMAINING in which
to select Christmas gifts the necessity of shipping
at once is of pressing importance if you would com
plete your list in time. Every resource of this great
store has been enlisted to the end that customer.'!
mav find here, as in seasons pat, HEST SERVICE
BEST VALUES BEST MERCHANDISE-
POUNDS
SUGAR
Saturday Special
GIFT SUGGESTIONS
CANDIES AND COOKIES ETC.
Your Christmas Supply at a Saving in price
Extra Fancy French Mix Creams, per lb
Plain Cream Mix, per lb
Broken Taffey. yum, yum, it's good, per tb.
Peanut Brittle, fresh each week, per lb. ....
Old Fashion Grocers Mix, per lb.
Broken Mix, the real Xmas Mix, per lb. ,
Old Fashion Chocolates, per lb.
NUTS AND DRIED FRUITS
will play an important role in your Christmas Dinner service
Oregon Walnuts, per lb. ..r
Larger sizes to 30c per lb.
Brazil Nuts, per IT.
Hazel Nuts, per lb -". -- -
California Soft Shell Almonds, per lb.
Bulk Seeded or Seedless Raisins, per lb.
fooae Muscat Raisins, per 11)
Bulk Black Fius, per tb
Bulk White Figs, per lb. .
Dried Peaches, per lb.
New Oregon Split Prunes, per lb. .
Citron Peel, per Va lb.
Plug Tobaccos such as Star, Horseshoe, Climax Plug
Xmas pkg. Chesterfield Cigarettes per carton
We have a large lot of good Manila Cigars, retail forfc
Will sell at each
Prince Albert, 16 oz. jar, Smoking Tobacco in Xmas pkgs. .
COFFEE, TEAS AND SPICES
M. J. B. Coffee
Is -
3s
r
People's Cash Store Special Blend PEABERRY COFFEE
A very fine grade, special per lb.
Cinnamon, 2 oz. Cans .... .
Pepper,, 2 oz. Cans ...
Nutmeg, 2 oz. Cans .
Tree Tea, black or Japan V2 lb, pkgs.
Gun Powrler Tea, bulk, per lb. .
English Breakfast Tea, per lb.
FLOUR
Crown Flour, per sack
per barrel
Blue Ribbon Flour, per sack .,
per barrell
Del Monte, patent Flour, per sack
per bid
Pride of West Flour, sack .
per bbl.
.28
.19
.16
.20
.14
.10
.2.1
.1.1
.17
.17
.2H
.15
.15
.21
,18
.2.1
.07
.28
.77
1.43
.0.1
1.45
.42
1.19
1.9.1
..10
.10
.07
.11
.28
..10
.35
$1.!)9
7.75
1 .55
fi.00
1 .85
7.20
1.35
5.30
For Her
Breakfast Jackets
Kimonas
Comfy Slippers
Dressingn Gowns
Until Robes
Center Pieces
Table Scarfs
Pillow Tops
Guest Towels
Scarfs
Sweaters
Tea Apron
Silk Waists
Petticoats
Skirts
Suits
Drosses
Millinery
Gloves
Veils '
Handkerchiefs
I.aee Collars
Hand Bags
Ivory
Camisoles
Woolen Blankets
Indian Blankets
Sheets
Pillow Cases
Table Linen
linth Towels
Towel Sets
Pair of Pillows
Doilies
Robe Blankets
liath Mats
Bed Spreads
Break fast Cloths
Satin Boudoirs
Silk Underwear
Silk Gowns
Lingette Chimcse
Fancy Pajamas
Silk Brassiers
Dressing Gowns
Morning Jackets
Morning Jacket
Kid Gloves
Cape Gauntlets
Kerchiefs
Vestees
Fancy Ribbons
Ready-to-wear
Footwear
For Him
liath Robes
Slippers
Shirt
Sox
Ties
'Moves
Sweater Coats
Hats
Cans
Silk Scarfs
Kerchief
Overcoats
Rain ('oats
Suits
Night Shirts
Pajamas
Suspenders
Clothes Brushes
Wool Shirts
Wool Sox
Wool Underwear
Wool Glove
Purse
Hill Folds
Kid Gloves
Silk Shirts
Heaver Hats
Uelts
Pongee Kerchiefs
T'njunions
Crocheted Ties
Cheney Ties
Novelty Tie
Traveling S'ets
Shoes
Pullovers
Coats wen ters
For Little Sis
, Book a
Game
Dresses
Coata
Middies
Sweaters
Shoe
Slippers
Stocking
Hats
rt.iin fspes
f!nth Robes
Kerchiefs
Glove
Dressing Sucqtie
'Kuney Ribbon
Pursc-H
Ivory Sets
For
Baby Brother
Dolls
Toys
Books .
Ribbon Novelties
jvnry Sets
Silk Knitted CP
Silk Stockings
Shoes
Bootees
Sweater Sets
Hlankets
Cnrriuge Robes
Mittens
Leggings
Cashmere Sncques
Rattles
Bibs
Coats
Dresses
Rompers
Silk Comforts
Novelties
BRING THE CHILDREN IN TO
SEE SANTACLAUS
FREE GIFTS TO CHILDREN ACCOMPANIED
BY PARENTSSATURDAY FROM 1 TO 4
HO tH